Ivy Tech Students Commit to Complete College

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 29, 2011

Today, Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington students, faculty and staff will sign certificates committing to community college completion, as part of a national initiative. Ivy Tech campuses across the state are participating in a “Commit to Complete” day initiative, which is designed to raise awareness of the benefits of college completion. A short ceremony will be held at Ivy Tech Bloomington’s main campus at 200 Daniels Way, at 2:00 p.m. in the student commons with Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan and Ivy Tech Bloomington Chancellor Whikehart. Students, faculty and staff will gather to show their support for and commitment to college completion. The initiative is hosted by the Phi Theta Kappa honor society.

In April 2011, Phi Theta Kappa (honor society for community colleges) was invited to sign the historic Democracy’s Call to Action to promote college completion, a unified move by the most influential organizations in the community college arena. Phi Theta Kappa was the only student organization invited to be a part of this landmark agreement. Phi Theta Kappa called on their chapters across the country to promote college completion, as part of a national initiative to increase the number of community college certificates and associated degrees awarded by 5 million over the next 10 years. They asked chapters to help raise awareness of the benefits of college completion by holding a Commit to Complete Day.

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Karst Farm Trail to pass through Ivy Tech property

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 25, 2011

Ivy Tech Community College’s State Board of Trustees voted on August 11, 2011 to allow the County’s plan for the Karst Farm Trail to pass through Ivy Tech property. The biking and walking trail will pass through Ivy Tech property near the Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, along N. Profile Parkway.

“The County is excited that Ivy Tech has allowed phase one of the Karst Farm Trail to move along as planned, passing through Ivy Tech and eventually providing access as far north as Ellettsville,” says Mark Stoops, Monroe County Commissioner. “This path will also create connections to the new YMCA and eventually to City trails, creating a nice interconnected trail way.”

The County asked Ivy Tech for 8,538 square feet of land because the area of right away was too narrow to build the trail.

“Ivy Tech’s participation in this continued partnership with the County to develop the trail is yet another demonstration of Ivy Tech’s commitment to civic engagement, and to using our institutional resources in service to our local communities,” says Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Chancellor John Whikehart. “Additionally, the trail will bring more people to the Ivy Tech campus and to the Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, which in itself is another partnership with Monroe County.”

There are plans for new Ivy Tech signage along the pathway and a limestone sitting area just outside of the Indiana Center for the Life Sciences.

Vice President of the Monroe County Commissioners, Iris Keisling says that she is pleased that the Ivy Tech State Trustees have allowed the Karst Farm Trail to pass along Ivy Tech property. “The walking and biking trail is going to really provide additional quality of life for the community,” she said.

Construction on phase one of the Karst Farm Trail will begin next spring, 2012.

For information about Ivy Tech, log on www.ivytech.edu/ or call 1(888) IVY-LINE.

Ivy Tech welcomes students in style

Ivy Tech welcomes students in style

Community college opens Monday with bagpipes and a greeting from the chancellor

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
August 22, 2011

In one account of the history of bagpipes, Scottish Highland armies used them to inspire their own forces and strike fear into the enemy as they marched toward the battlefield.

Ivy Tech Community College Chancellor John Whikehart will be shooting for the former when he brings bagpiper Ian Arthur in to play his pipes on the steps of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building this morning.

In what has become a tradition, Whikehart and Arthur will greet students bright and early when the Bloomington campus opens for fall classes today.

“This is the official start of the fall semester, in which many students begin or continue their journeys toward accomplishing their academic goals,” he said in a prepared statement. “I am proud to welcome them with open doors to Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus.”

Today and Tuesday, students will get to indulge in a fresh start breakfast including coffee and pastries at the main campus, Liberty Drive and Liberty Crossing locations. Other Welcome Week activities include a cookout with live music today, a comedy show on Tuesday and student involvement fairs on Wednesday.

The third annual Welcome Week Music Fest will take place on Thursday at 7 p.m. Welcome Week Music Fest will be held on the main campus lawn and is open to Ivy Tech students, who are encouraged to bring their families and friends to the event.

This year’s Music Fest at Ivy Tech will have performances by Eric Radoux, Lindsay Smith and Vaughn & Co. In addition to free concerts, Ivy Tech students, friends and family will enjoy a photo booth, kids’ zone and fireworks finale. Attendees will also get the chance to win an iPad2 at the event.

Welcome Week events and activities are planned and hosted by Ivy Tech’s student Campus Activities Board.

The celebratory events of the week are for more than just show, according to assistant vice chancellor for student affairs Sam DeWeese. DeWeese said the more connected students are with their campus, the better they do academically.

“Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus offers relevant and engaging activities through the Office of Student Support and Development, as well as through the Center for Civic Engagement,” he said.

“Offering a wide variety of experiences for students with diverse backgrounds are just some of the ways that Ivy Tech makes connections with our students.”

For more information about student life opportunities at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus, log on www.ivytech.edu/bloomington and click on Student Life, or click on Civic Engagement for volunteer options.


Ian Arthur opens another year at Ivy Tech Community College with a bagpipe serenade in this photo from 2009.. The bagpiper has become an opening-day tradition at the school. David Snodgress | Herald-Times


Whikehart

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2011

Ivy Tech kicks off fall semester on Monday, hosts third annual Welcome Week Music Fest

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 22, 2011

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington’s fall semester kicks off on Monday morning, August 22. Per campus traditions, students can expect to be greeted on the morning of the first day of classes at the main entrance of the main campus, now named the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, by Chancellor John Whikehart and bagpiper Ian Arthur.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart says that he looks forward to the first day of classes each year. “This is the official start of the fall semester, in which many students begin or continue their journeys toward accomplishing their academic goals,” he said. “I am proud to welcome them with open doors to Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus.”

The third annual Welcome Week Music Fest will take place on Thursday, August 25 at 7 p.m. Welcome Week Music Fest will be held on the main campus lawn and is open to Ivy Tech students who are encouraged to bring their families and friends to the event.

This year’s Music Fest at Ivy Tech will have performances by Eric Radoux, Lindsay Smith and Vaughn & Co. In addition to free concerts, Ivy Tech students, friends and family will enjoy a photo booth, kid’s zone and fireworks finale. Attendees will also get the chance to win an iPad2 at the event.

On Monday and Tuesday of Welcome Week, students will see a fresh start breakfast including coffee and pastries at the main campus, Liberty Drive and Liberty Crossing locations. Other Welcome Week activities include a cookout with live music on Monday, a comedy show on Tuesday and student involvement fairs on Wednesday. Welcome Week events and activities are planned and hosted by Ivy Tech’s student Campus Activities Board.

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Sam DeWeese says that studies show the more connected students are with their campus, the better they do academically. “Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus offers relevant and engaging activities through the Office of Student Support and Development, as well as through the Center or Civic Engagement,” he says. “Offering a wide variety of experiences for students with diverse backgrounds are just some of the ways that Ivy Tech makes connections with our students.”

For more information about student life opportunities at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus log on www.ivytech.edu/bloomington and click on Student Life or click on Civic Engagement for volunteer options.

 

Welcome Week Activity Schedule for reporting or photographs


Monday, August 22

Chancellor greeting begins at 7:40 a.m.

8-10am: Fresh Start with Campus Activities Board (CAB) – Free coffee, hot chocolate, hot tea and pastries (Main campus, Liberty Dr and Liberty Crossing)

11:30am-2pm: CAB Cookout – Free hotdogs, hamburgers and cookies, with live music by Calumet Reel (Main campus – Outdoor plaza)

Tuesday, August 23

8-10am: Fresh Start with Campus Activities Board (CAB) – Free coffee, hot chocolate, hot tea and pastries (Main campus)

11am-2pm: Wellness and Recreation Connection – Free healthy snacks and lifestyle enhancement information (Main campus)

7-8:30pm: Comedy Hypnosis Show – Free admission and refreshments. Guests must be at least 16 years of age (Main campus)

Wednesday, August 24

11am-2pm: Student Involvement Fair – Free Jiffy Treet ice cream (Main campus)

4:45-6pm: Student Involvement Fair – Free Chick-fil-A (Main campus)

Thursday, August 25

7-9:30pm: Welcome Week Music Fest – Free concert, food, photo booth, kid’s zone, iPad 2 giveaway and fireworks finale. Family and friends of all ages are welcome to attend. Bring you blankets and lawn chairs—no coolers permitted. (Main campus lawn)

Former Limestone Grille co-owner, Chef Tad DeLay, to teach at Ivy Tech

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 18, 2011

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus welcomes former Limestone Grille chef/co-owner, Chef Tad Delay, to the college as a full-time faculty member in its hospitality program this fall. Chef Delay will teach Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s advanced level cuisine courses.

Chef Jeff Taber of Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Hospitality Administration Program says that Ivy Tech is excited to welcome Chef Delay to the college this fall. “Chef Delay has over 35 years of experience, and has worked in some of the finest restaurants and country clubs in the area,” he said. “Chef Delay brings with him expertise and connections in the local culinary community for the benefit and success of Ivy Tech students.”

Cuisine courses that Chef Delay will teach include: Classical Cuisine, which focuses on mastering the Classical French cooking methods; and Specialized Cuisine, which focuses on International Cuisine and the cooking techniques associated with it.

Chef Delay served as chef/ co-owner of Opie Taylor’s and the Limestone Grille for 19 years. He has been an active member of the Bloomington restaurant community.

“Chef Delay’s expertise will bring students wonderful opportunities to gain the knowledge and skills necessary in the industry,” Taber said. “Plus, he can play a vital role in assisting our students with quality job placement upon graduation.”

Ivy Tech Community College fall courses begin August 22. For more information about course options or application information, log on http://www.ivytech.edu or call 1-888- IVY LINE.

Students receive $2,500 scholarships in new hospital foundation program

By Dann Denny 331-4350 | ddenny@heraldt.com
August 15, 2011

Ten students each received a $2,500 scholarship from a new scholarship program, launched by the Bloomington Hospital Foundation, designed to help future health care providers.

Among the winners are Amy Fish, an Ivy Tech student from Lawrence County studying radiation therapy who will graduate in the spring of 2012; Tamara Morrison, a Ball State University student from Owen County studying nursing who plans to graduate in the summer of 2012; and Ryan Trevithick, a Purdue University student from Lawrence County, studying pharmacy who plans to graduate in the spring of 2013.

Two winners are Indiana University students — Heather Gray, who is studying dietetics and plans to graduate in the spring of 2012; and Amanda Meyer, who is studying speech therapy and plans to graduate in the spring of 2012.

The other scholarship recipients are Lisa Racine, who is studying occupational therapy at IUPUI and graduated in June; Tiffany Brewer, who is attending Indiana State University to study nursing and plans to graduate in the fall of 2012; Danica Misz, who is studying dietetics at IUPUI and graduated in June; Olivia Nguyen, a Purdue University student, who is studying pharmacy and plans to graduate in the spring of 2012; Natalie Fishel, who is studying physical therapy at the University of Evansville, and plans to graduate in the spring of 2013.

The scholarship winners were chosen by a selection committee from a pool of 53 student applicants in south central Indiana.

To be eligible for one of the $2,500 scholarships, students needed to be enrolled in a degree program for qualifying health care careers.

“We had many applicants with outstanding credentials which included high grades, many volunteer activities and compelling letters of recommendation from their peers, professors, and supervisors,” said Catherine Sherwood-Laughlin, scholarship committee member and Bloomington Hospital Foundation board member in a prepared statement. “Therefore, selecting the award recipients was difficult.”

The 2011 scholarship recipients are, from left, Lisa Racine, Amy Fish, Tiffany Brewer, Danica Misz, Olivia Nguyen, Tamara Morrison, Heather Gray and Amanda Meyer. Not pictured are Ryan Trevithick and Natalie Fishel. Courtesy photo

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2011

Ivy Tech names Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building in honor of $1 million gift

Ivy Tech names Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building in honor of $1 million gift

Donors say gift is to call attention to school’s expansion needs

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
August 11, 2011

The main Ivy Tech Community College facility on Bloomington’s west side is now officially the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building.

The Fergusons, Ivy Tech President Thomas J. Snyder and Chancellor John Whikehart presided over the naming ceremony under a brilliant blue sky late Wednesday afternoon. Workers peeled back a banner covering the building’s new name over the entrance of the building as local Ivy Tech supporters and the community college system’s state board of trustees witnessed the short ceremony.

Whikehart said he and Snyder asked the Fergusons if they would agree to the naming after Steve Ferguson told him in February that he and his wife wanted to make a $1 million contribution to the Bloomington campus. Both Fergusons said in separate interviews before the ceremony that one of the primary reasons they wanted to make their contribution now was to demonstrate their support for a 85,000-square-foot, $20 million addition to the current building, which opened in 2002.

The 148,000-square-foot building was designed to accommodate 5,000 students. The Bloomington enrollment has increased from 2,300 students in 2002 to 6,400 and is projected to continue to increase. The Indiana General Assembly approved the design for a new addition in 2007 and approved bonding authority for construction in 2009. The Indiana Higher Education Commission has not passed a construction recommendation on to the state budget committee for approval, however, and earlier this year indicated it was pulling back all Ivy Tech construction projects for further review.

“I hope we can get their attention,” Steve Ferguson said. “It’s not like I haven’t made my voice heard at those levels. But there’s nothing like putting your money where your mouth is. You need to step up if you believe in something, and I believe this campus needs this addition.”

Connie Ferguson represented Bloomington on Ivy Tech’s Regional Board of Trustees when Bloomington was affiliated with the Columbus region and has served as chairman of the Ivy Tech-Bloomington trustees since the Bloomington campus was created at the Westbury Village location in 2000. She said she believes the opening of the current building in 2002 was a catalyst that made the Bloomington campus one of the fastest-growing in the nation.

“It’s one of those cases where the bricks and mortar made a difference,” she said this week. “You can see it in the students — they recognize this institution means something.”

The rapid growth of the Bloomington college has forced Ivy Tech to lease about 30,000 square feet of space, mostly in commercial and office buildings along Liberty Drive near the main campus.

Steve Ferguson is chairman of the board of Cook Group Inc., the medical device manufacturer with its world headquarters located very close to the Ivy Tech campus. He also is a former Indiana legislator and former Indiana University trustee.

Ferguson invoked an old Chinese proverb at Wednesday’s event. “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,” he said. “Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.”

“We have over 20 million people in this country who are either unemployed or underemployed,” he said when interviewed. “We’ve got 2 million vacant jobs in this country. It’s a gap we have in education and training, and it’s also an income gap because people who have an education are earning consistently more than those without. That income gap can only be solved by education.”

Connie Ferguson choked up momentarily when she told the audience how much she and her husband value education and access to education.

Over the years, the Fergusons have supported Ivy Tech students through endowed scholarships in biotechnology, nursing, radiation therapy and other programs. They’ve made other contributions as well, including financial support to launch the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship last year.

Steve Ferguson said the growth of the Ivy Tech Bloomington campus has created a special synergy with its increasing cooperation and partnerships with IU and turned Bloomington into an education hub. “It’s a gateway here,” he said. “Not to take anything away from the other schools in Indiana, but if you think about the two impact institutions in this state, IU has over 100,000 students and the Ivy Tech system has over 100,000 students. I would guess that if you added up all of the other public and private institutions together they wouldn’t educate as many people as IU and Ivy Tech.”

Ivy Tech is the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system and serves nearly 200,000 students annually.

Connie and Steve Ferguson, center, admire the new sign for the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building Wednesday with Tom Snyder, left, president of Ivy Tech Community College, and chancellor John Whikehart during the naming ceremony on campus. Chris Howell | Herald-Times

Steve and Connie Ferguson walk down the steps with John Whikehart, Ivy Tech chancellor, at right, to greet people after Wednesday’s naming ceremony for the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building at Ivy Tech Community College. Chris Howell | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2011