Banned book passages to be read at Ivy Tech Friday

Banned book passages to be read at Ivy Tech Friday

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
February 29, 2012

Read Across America Day celebrates the birthday of the imaginative children’s author, Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, and plays out in programs across the country where adults come into schools and libraries and read to children.

It may come as a surprise to some, however, that even Dr. Seuss faced censorship battles, particularly for his book, “The Lorax,” whose theme of environmental awareness has long raised objections from the logging industry.

The late Dr. Seuss might have the last laugh on that one, as a movie based on the book is slated for release on Read Across America Day Friday. The film includes the voices of celebrities and actors, including Taylor Swift, Zac Efron, Betty White, Danny DeVito, Ed Helms and Rob Riggle.

Ivy Tech Bloomington will celebrate the day with a noon-5 p.m. program featuring students and community members reading passages from banned and challenged books in the commons area of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building.

The event is hosted and coordinated by students in Ivy Tech Bloomington’s “American Literature After 1865” service-learning class and the Creative Writing Club. “I think it helps make it clear how widespread the phenomenon of challenging literature is,” said Elizabeth Starr, who teaches the class. “It can be children’s books. It can be the classics.”

Among the books Ivy Tech’s students will be reading this term are Mark Twain’s “Pudd’nhead Wilson,” William Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying,” Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and Alice Walker’s “The Color Purple.” Students also are blogging about their reading experiences at http://ivytechbloomblog.blogspot.com. The blog is a service learning project in partnership with the Ivy Tech-Bloomington Library. The public, students and staff are invited to read and comment on student blog entries. Students will select and recognize the best outside comment on their blog at the end of the semester.

Non-students also are invited to read passages from banned or challenged books or simply witness the readings. Starr can be reached at estarr@ivytech.edu to discuss possible readings and available reading times.

In addition to the reading event, students are running a book through March 9 to collect paperback books for Boxcar Books and the Midwest Pages to Prisoners project. Bins will be located throughout Ivy Tech’s main campus.

Those who donate books or volunteer to read at the Read Across America Day event on March 2 will receive an “I Read Banned Books” button or free cookies supplied by Chef Jeff Tabor’s Ivy Tech HOSP 105 students.

Dr. Seusss’ 1971 book “The Lorax,” above, whose theme of environmental awareness has long raised objections from the logging industry, is slated for release as a major motion picture Friday on Read Across America Day.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Ivy Tech volunteers to read banned books to celebrate Read Across America Day

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 27, 2012 

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is celebrating Read Across America Day on Friday, March 2 from Noon to 5 p.m. with open microphone readings of banned and challenged books in the main campus Student Commons, located in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. The event is hosted and coordinated by students in Ivy Tech – Bloomington’s American Literature After 1865 service-learning class and the Creative Writing Club.

Read Across America Day commemorates the birthday of Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, and encourages every adult to read to a child on March 2.

Ivy Tech – Bloomington is going to use this day to celebrate the freedom to read by focusing on reading banned and challenged books – starting with Dr. Seuss’s own The Lorax. In addition to the reading event, students are running a book drive from February 27 through March 9 to collect paperback books for Boxcar Books and the Midwest Pages to Prisoners project. Bins will be located throughout Ivy Tech’s main campus. Those who donate books or volunteer to read at the Read Across America Day event on March 2 will receive an “I Read Banned Books” button or free cookies supplied by Chef Jeff Tabor’s Ivy Tech HOSP 105 students.

Participants in the reading on March 2 can select their own banned or challenged book to read, but plenty of books will be available to choose from on site, selected by the ENGL 223 students. Contact Professor Elizabeth Starr at estarr@ivytech.edu to sign up to read.

Students are blogging about banned and challenged books on their class blog—titled Ban THIS!—at http://ivytechbloomblog.blogspot.com. The blog is a service learning project in partnership with the Ivy Tech – Bloomington Library. The public, students, and staff are invited to read and comment on student blog entries. Students will select and recognize the best outside comment on their blog at the end of the semester.

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center and WonderLab Museum host art activities for March First Friday

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 24, 2012

The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center and the WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology, located two blocks apart, will offer concurrent arts events for all ages, and joint summer camp and internship information tables on Friday evening, March 2.

An opening reception will be held at Ivy Tech Waldron for Youth Art Month from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., with light refreshments. For Youth Art Month, Monroe County Community School Corporation middle and high school art, selected by teachers, will be on exhibit. Four galleries will be filled with drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, stained glass, digital art, jewelry and other art mediums. During the opening reception, Ivy Tech Community College student volunteers will help kids of all ages create colorful fabric ornaments to celebrate WonderLab’s quilting-themed “Science of Art” program the same evening. Additionally, in the Treasurer’s Gallery, Aimee Denault’s printmaking art, “Unison to Disunison,” will be on exhibit. Youth Art Month exhibits and “Unison to Disunison” will run March 2-April 1.

WonderLab’s “Science of Art: ‘Sew’ Many Quilts” will take place from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. featuring Nashville textile artist Daren Redman, who is honored as an Indiana Artisan. She will be available to talk with visitors as she demonstrates a free motion machine quilting technique for “painting” images on a quilt. Visitors will be able to engage in a number of related activities that draw the connections between art and science. These activities include sewing a shibori-dyed fabric small tote bag or Capri Sun pouch coin purse to take home and trying several hands-on activities that delve into the quilter’s world of mathematics, chemistry, and engineering. In addition, the first 100 visitors will receive a free Fractiles set with 21 pieces (limit: one set per family or couple). Lead sponsorship for WonderLab’s “Science of Art” program series is provided by F. Rudolf Turner, with additional grant support from the BEAD Arts Partner Grant Program, the Indiana Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts. The current art exhibition on display at WonderLab is “Sassy Quilting by Shiisa Quilts Staff.”

Half-price general admission ($3.50) will be in effect during WonderLab’s extended evening hours, and a small plate meal of macaroni and cheese, sugar snap peas, and whole wheat bread prepared by Bloomingfoods Deli will be available to purchase on-site at the museum. WonderLab is located at 308 West Fourth Street. For more information, call 812-337-1337 ext. 25 or go online to wonderlab.org or WonderLab’s Facebook page.

Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center is open every day from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and is located at 122 S. Walnut Street. For more information call (812) 330-4400 or visit www.ivytech.edu/waldron.

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Production underway for first Ivy Tech Bloomington student play at Ivy Tech Waldron

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 17, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is producing its first-ever student theatre production this spring at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, “Waiting for Lefty,” a classic play by Clifford Odets. Performances will run April 13-21 at 7:30 p.m. in the Ivy Tech Waldron Rose Firebay, with one matinee performance on April 21 at 2 p.m. The play is directed by Ivy Tech Waldron artistic director Paul Daily.

“As a comprehensive community college, it is part of the mission of the Ivy Tech – Bloomington campus to provide arts education and arts opportunities for students,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “We have 10 Ivy Tech students performing in our first play, several slots open for Ivy Tech students as stage crew, and some employees will serve on the technical side.”

 Student auditions were held in late January for the cast, and call outs will be made for assistance from students on the technical side – building sets, sewing costumes, hanging and running lights, and for help during the run with set pieces and costumes.

“Although the play is almost eighty years old and very much of its time, with the Occupy movement and the Right to Work controversy, it is relevant again,” said Paul Daily, Ivy Tech Waldron artistic director.

Tickets are available for purchase at the Buskirk-Chumley box office, or by visiting http://www.bctboxoffice.com/. Tickets are $15, or $5 for students/seniors.

Close to home – Rural students embrace easy access to college

Times-Mail
TMNews.com

Close to home
Rural students embrace easy access to college

BY ROGER MOON roger@tmnews.com
February 15, 2012

FRENCH LICK — As promised, a month after the announcement about a new partnership returning higher education to Orange County, classes have begun at the Orange County Learning Center, Springs Valley Campus.

“Our school board and community have been very supportive of bringing this opportunity to not only our community (the Springs Valley School Corp. district), but certainly it’s a county-wide effort,” said Todd Pritchett, Springs Valley schools superintendent.

The January announcement focused on plans for Ivy Tech of Bloomington to begin offering the classes as a way of boosting education in the community.

Space is provided to Ivy Tech without charge by the Springs Valley School Corp. The building, at 479 S. Larry Bird Blvd., once housed the Wee Care child care program.

“We offer a couple of our vocational courses over there and also a pre-school program that we have,” Pritchett said.

A number of partners, including the Orange County Community Foundation, cooperated to bring the classes to Orange County.

The availability of higher learning options follows the closing of the Orange County Area Learning Center, which dissolved in December 2010.

“Our first class started on Feb. 6. We have four classes going right now,” said Jennie Vaughan, Ivy Tech Community College vice chancellor for student affairs. The campus now is serving 11 students, with some of those being enrolled in more than one class. Current classes are in reading, English composition and algebra, in addition to a seminar targeting students who are new to college.

“We are so excited,” Vaughan said. “We had an open house and we had over 40 people … who were interested in taking classes with us. We have hired a coordinator. Every day she has more and more people coming in to find out how to apply for classes.”

Carol Hudelson serves as the coordinator. “We have had a lot of people who have called and come in and talked to us about what we offer,” Hudelson said. “It’s mostly the adult learner,” Hudelson said, explaining that few, to date, have been in high school or are recent graduates.

“We’ve had a lot of people coming in saying, ‘I started at Ivy Tech a few years ago. I dropped out. It was such a long commute,’” Hudelson said. Now those students can build on the earlier experience without the inconvenience of commuting.

Vaughan said, “We’re starting another group of classes on March 5. Those will be 8-week courses, full academic classes. We’re recruiting for that right now.”

The plan to enhance educational opportunities for the community’s residents is one that will benefit students across the spectrum. Students as young as high school age can have access to new opportunities, and even seasoned professionals, through Ivy Tech’s corporate college short-term training, can add or sharpen skills that will make them better employees.

Classes related to such areas as customer service and hospitality will be among the offerings.

“The location down here is beneficial with the resort being one of the bigger employers in the county,” Pritchett said.

Martin County

Higher education opportunities are available in Martin County through the Martin County Community Learning Center/Ivy Tech Community College.

The most recent announcement about classes available there reports on an introductory computer class, which is scheduled to begin March 27 and run four Tuesdays from 6-9 p.m. Information is available by calling Ivy Tech’s Center for Lifelong Learning at (812) 330-4400.

Adult Basic Education classes also are offered in Martin County. More information is available by calling Vincennes University at (812) 888-5749. The number at the Learning Center is (812) 295-2674.

Times-Mail Staff Writer Roger Moon welcomes comments at 277-7252 and roger@tmnews.com.


FRENCH LICK — Darian Powell, left, and Natasha Cox visit the Orange County Learning Center’s website Monday afternoon during their first day of one of Ivy Tech Community College’s newest courses now offered in The Valley. The Orange County Community Foundation partnered with Ivy Tech and other groups to reintroduce higher education in the county after the closing of the Orange County Area Learning Center in December 2010. (Times-Mail photos / RICH JANZARUK)


FRENCH LICK — Nancy Pace teaches Ivy Tech’s Introduction to College course at Orange County Learning Center, Springs Valley Campus Monday. Ivy Tech announced its new endeavor to bring higher education to Orange County one month ago, and the site’s first classes began Feb. 6.

Copyright: TMNews.com 2012

Ivy Tech offers tax help to low-income households

Ivy Tech offers tax help to low-income households

H-T Report
February 14, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus, in coordination with the Internal Revenue Service and the city of Bloomington’s Community and Family Resources, is providing free tax preparation services for low-income households through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program.

“Ivy Tech Bloomington’s income tax accounting classes have completed more than 2,500 tax returns for low-income families in our area since 2004, demonstrating our campus commitment to modeling a service-oriented learning environment,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “Ivy Tech students have generated total refunds of more than $3,500,000 for families in our communities, with almost $1,800,000 in the last two years.”

Free tax assistance at Ivy Tech will be offered by appointment only on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays now through March 6 on the main campus in B201, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building.

To make an appointment for the VITA program at Ivy Tech, call 332-1559, ext. 0. Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus is at 200 Daniels Way, on the west side of Bloomington.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Kids learn about starting up small businesses through Lemonade Day program

Kids learn about starting up small businesses through Lemonade Day program

By Rod Spaw 331-4338 | rspaw@heraldt.com
February 10, 2012

Indianapolis had 10,000 in 2011. Houston, where it all began, had 50,000 last year.

Compared to those numbers, Bloomington’s inaugural foray this year into the national Lemonade Day program seems modest. Organizers want to find at least 200 local children between the ages of 5 and 15 who are interested in learning how to start and to operate a small business.

However, local promoters say there’s much more involved than just raising the next generation of capitalists.

Steve Bryant, executive director of the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington, says the bigger picture is teaching kids the importance of such things as planning, personal responsibility, goal setting and philanthropy. He said the program shows kids how to be self-sufficient and empowers them with collaboration and problem solving skills.

The Cook Center is only one of the community partners bringing Lemonade Day to Bloomington. The Boys and Girls Clubs of Bloomington, the Bloomington and Monroe County governments are involved, as well as long list of local businesses, as sponsors. Volunteers also will be needed to serve as adult mentors to the youthful entrepreneurs and guide them as they execute the business plans they will create for their own stands.

Financial assistance has been provided by the Coleman Foundation, which supports entrepreneurship education across the country. Bryant said a grant from the foundation will pay for teaching materials that each participant will receive in a backpack in early March.

The Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County also will help defray some cost of lemonade stand building materials. As a result, local sponsors say, the actual costs to the children will be minimal.

However, participants aren’t expected to get a free ride into the business world. One of the requirements is for the children — who may either work alone or in teams — to find “investors” to loan them money to cover the cost of such things as the ingredients for the lemonade.

That money is to be repaid at an agreed upon rate from the proceeds of sales on May 19, which is the day set for lemonade stands to sprout across Bloomington.


Learn more

Two information sessions for Bloomington’s first Lemonade Day will be held later this month at the Bloomington Boys and Girls Club at 311 S. Lincoln St.

The first session will be 6:30 to 7 p.m. Feb. 23, and the second will be 10 to 10:30 a.m. Feb. 25.

Participation is open to children age 5 to 15 years. Persons interested in serving as adult mentors or volunteers also are invited to attend.

May 19 is the day set this year for Lemonade Day sales throughout the community.

More information is available at www.bloomington.lemonadeday.org or by calling the Boys and Girls Club at 332-5311.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012