An early start on college

IN SCHOOL
An early start on college

Program helps high schoolers learn skills, earn credits toward degree

By April Toler 331-4353 | atoler@heraldt.com
March 27, 2012

Jorge Cortes’ parents may have never attended college, but that didn’t stop them from encouraging their son to take his education, and dreams, as far as they can go.

“It’s a big thing for me,” said Jorge, a senior at Bloomington High School South. “(My parents) always inspired me to push forward and try to go as far as I could.”

Thanks to MCCSC’s Early College Program, Jorge will not only be the first person in his family to attend college, he will enter Indiana University with 12 college credits on his record.

“It’s helped me a lot,” he said. “It’s helped give me skills, like note taking, and the experience of knowing what college work is like.”

Monroe County Community School Corp. began offering the Early College Program four years ago at both Bloomington high schools North and South.

The program’s goal is to “increase college enrollment for first-generation, low-income and underrepresented students.”

Students who participate in the program are offered dual-credit classes each year. Freshman year, North and South students take a new student seminar, which earns them three college credits and prepares them for what college-level work will be like.

Sophomore year, North students can earn two credits through a critical thinking class and a portfolio and project development management class. South students can earn three credits by taking part in an introduction to microcomputers class.

Junior year, South students can earn three credits by taking Survey of American History. North students can earn up to three credits through the introduction to microcomputers class.

Senior year, students can participate in fundamentals of public speaking, earning an additional three credits.

In the end, if the students participate all four years, they can earn up to 12 credits at South and up to 11 credits at North, all of which transfer to Ivy Tech Community College and IU.

Throughout the program, students are also assigned mentors and visit college campuses to become familiar with being in a college environment.

Jay True, assistant principal at South, said the program serves not only as a way to earn college credits, but provides a sense of encouragement some students wouldn’t otherwise receive.

“It’s a pretty big leap for a lot of these kids,” True said. “We try to do a lot of things to show them it’s possible, you can do it.”

Senior Exsenet Esler admits that before joining the Early College Program, she felt nervous about college.

“I was kind of scared,” she said. “I wasn’t really sure stepping into college, how were the professors going to be, how will the book work be?”

After taking her first early college class, Exsenet knew that being a part of the program would prepare her for college. But the South senior, who plans to attend IU, never realized exactly how much it was preparing her until speaking with her brother.

“My brother, he was at Ivy Tech, and he said, ‘Oh, you’re taking the same classes I’m taking,’” Exsenet said. “I’m like, ‘that’s pretty awesome.’”

Myles Adams, a junior at North, got involved in the program through the encouragement of his aunt and uncle. With a desire to attend medical school, Myles said the Early College Program has given him an early perspective on what it takes to do college-level work.

“They teach you a lot of things that are going to be useful in college, like critical thinking, note taking. A lot of kids don’t know how to take a lot of good notes, so those are the two positive things they do,” he said.

Although earning college credits at no cost is a great advantage of the Early College Program, Marcus Debro, assistant principal at North, said the program gives students so much more. It provides confidence and reassurance, he said, that can make a world of difference in a student’s education and life.

“One of the things that certain students exhibit is that they can’t,” Debro said. “Once we show them that they can, then there’s that sense of pride that all of a sudden, wow, I got an A in a college level class, surely I can get an A in a high school class. They have a tendency to work a little harder once they’ve been in this program.”


Jorge Cortes works on a speech in class at Bloomington High School South. The students are part of an early college program that allows students to receive college credit while in high school. David Snodgress | Herald-Times


Exsenet Esler, right, talks with Jessica Neal as they work on a speech in class at BHS South. The students are part of an early college program that allows students to receive college credit while in high school. David Snodgress | Herald-Times


Jay True, assistant principal at BHS South, talks about the early college program that allows students to receive college credit while in high school. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

Ivy Tech takes the stage

Ivy Tech takes the stage

Community college delves into theater world with first play

By Laura Gleason | Special to the Hoosier Times
March 25, 2012

BLOOMINGTON — Ian Martin went to a performing arts-themed high school in Cincinnati and missed being involved in theater when he enrolled at Ivy Tech Community College last fall.

“A couple months ago, I was a little weary about being in community college,” he said.

But as luck would have it, Ivy Tech is putting on its first play this semester, and being part of the cast has transformed Martin’s experience of the college. “I’m really glad I’m here. The group of people is amazing, and the concept is so dynamic,” Martin said.

The play, “Waiting for Lefty,” is a 1935 drama about class and labor struggles. Artistic director Paul Daily sees performing a play as a step toward providing Ivy Tech students with a comprehensive, well-rounded college experience and hopes it will be the first of many plays performed in a flourishing arts program at the college.

Daily, who has an acting background, helped start a theater company in New York City, where he lived for many years. He and his wife moved to Kokomo after the birth of their first son. Daily, missing the stage, started directing a reader’s theater group at Ivy Tech Kokomo for students, in which the actors performed with their scripts in hand.

Eventually he suggested putting on full productions and including faculty and staff in the cast. The school supported the idea but didn’t have a budget for it. “I said that was fine, I’d do it for fun. I’m a minimalist director anyway. I don’t need a lot of sets and costumes,” he said.

Then Chancellor John Whikehart from Ivy Tech Bloomington called with a question. “Do you want to come down here and do the same thing, only get paid? I said yes,” Daily said.

Ivy Tech Bloomington currently offers one theater-related class, theater appreciation. Ultimately, Daily would like to see Ivy Tech put on multiple productions a year and offer three or four theater classes for credits that can be transferred to IU.

“In terms of how this affects Ivy Tech, it’s a large step in helping with retention and in creating the college experience for the students,” Daily said.

The auditions were advertised in January, and more than enough people came out. The play has mostly male roles, and they were filled mainly by Ivy Tech students, with a few IU students mixed in.

Daily is currently working on his master of fine arts degree in directing, and one of his assignments for his “Directing Realism” class is to produce a realist play. He chose Clifford Odets’ “Waiting for Lefty,” which is about a union of taxi drivers deciding whether or not to go on strike, because its themes of class and labor issues felt fresh. “I think it’s a terrific play and I think it’s so relevant right now,” Daily said.

His actors seem to agree. “It’s really timely; it’s overtly political but it isn’t partisan. The answer doesn’t lie in them supporting FDR or the union, the answer lies in the guys standing up for themselves, taking charge of their own state of affairs and trying to change it,” said Nathaniel Alcock, a sophomore at Ivy Tech.

Alcock came to Ivy Tech to make college more affordable, finishing his general education credits before transferring to IU. Although he enjoyed participating in theater in high school, it didn’t occur to him that he could pursue it in college.

“I probably wouldn’t have been involved in any theater unless somebody explicitly said that they were looking for Ivy Tech students to be in a play, because that world just isn’t open to us. We don’t have any connection to it,” he said.

Now that he’s come into contact with the IU theater department, he’d like to get more involved once he transfers. “Theater wasn’t really on my radar before this. I would love to audition for another production sometime.”

This sort of reaction is precisely what Daily has been hoping for as he and others at Ivy Tech work to flesh out the college’s arts programming.

“When you’re going to a school just to take a class, it’s easy to stop going when it gets hard or when it’s something you’re not interested in. When you start adding other activities in, more of your sweat and blood is involved, and you’re going to stay committed to it,” Daily said.

The play will be performed for the public, but Daily sees its function as being mainly by and for the Ivy Tech community. “I’m not competing with BPP (the Bloomington Playwrights Project) or Cardinal Stage Company to put on a professional production. I’m not competing with Monroe County Civic Theater to do community theater, I’m not even competing with IU to do an IU production. I’m giving Ivy Tech students the opportunity to perform in an Ivy Tech production and have an educational experience,” he said.

There’s more to college than racking up credits and getting a good GPA. For Daily, it brings to mind a passage he recently read by Ken Neufeld, president and CEO of the Victoria Theatre Association. “Can you remember the first time you bought a gallon of milk?” Neufeld asked. Generally, the answer is no. “Can you remember the first time you saw a play?” Most people can.

“That’s because theater is something that changes your life, and we remember things that change our lives. I hope there’s some of that here for these students,” Daily said.


If you go

WHO: Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington

WHAT: “Waiting for Lefty,” a play by Clifford Odets

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. April 13-14, 18-21; 2 p.m. April 21

WHERE: Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center’s Rose Firebay, 122 S. Walnut St., Bloomington

TICKETS: $15 general admission and $5 for students/seniors; available at the Buskirk-Chumley box office at 114 E. Kirkwood Ave., 812-323-3020, or by visiting www.bctboxoffice.com


Director Paul Daily watches his characters during a Wednesday rehearsal at the Waldron. “Waiting For Lefty” is Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington’s first play. Ryan Dorgan | Herald-Times


Patricia Rochell, an Ivy Tech freshman, takes character advice from director Paul Daily during a Wednesday rehearsal. Ryan Dorgan | Herald-Times


Ian Ketcham, left, a theater student at Indiana University, goes over lines with “Waiting for Lefty” director Paul Daily. “Acting is all me-me-me,” says Daily. “Directing is so different. It’s about finding the strengths in everyone else and helping those surface.” Ryan Dorgan | Herald-Times

Small companies may need plan for harder times

Small companies may need plan for harder times

By Steven E. Bryant | A Bloomington voice
March 23, 2012

By now we have all heard about and seen footage of the damage in several southern Indiana and Midwestern communities from tornados. Several communities have experienced total devastation of homes, schools, government buildings and businesses of all kinds. It will take time and resources to rebuild, and it is gratifying to see so many people giving time, money and goods to help the victims through a truly difficult time in their lives. This got me thinking of small businesses that have been impacted and how they deal with the effects of a disastrous event such as a tornado, fire or other natural disaster. Turns out, according to the Small Business Administration, somewhere between 25 percent and 45 percent of all small businesses do not reopen after a devastating event.

So, what can we learn from those who have been through these types of situations so we can better prepare small businesses for sustainability? Well, one of the first courses of action is to develop a Business Continuity Plan (BCP). You can Google many templates on the Internet, but the BCP is essentially a document that walks through the important procedures used in case of a disaster. Businesses in regulated industries are required to have a BCP, and small businesses can benefit from the types of questions entertained in the BCP.

A few examples of questions include: Do you have copies of vital company documents, do you have adequate data backup for computer systems, how quickly can we recover and serve our customers, do you have a temporary location to do business in case of disaster, is there cash flow to survive several months while the business rebuilds? These are all critical questions that all small business owners need to discuss.

The business should also have a plan for succession in case of death or disabling condition for the owner/operator. Who steps in to run it? Do they have the skills needed to keep it going? Is there a family member or business partner who can handle essential management roles? Can your insurance agent, banker and other vendors assist in key areas? These are the types of important questions for all small business owners to be asking every day. Think about the small hair salon, diner or retail shop. Can they survive when customers cannot get to them because of the blocked roads, cleanup efforts and restrictions due to possible looting? These are scary, but real, business scenarios that many communities are dealing with today due to the tornado damage a few weeks ago. Preparation and planning are key to keep your small business going through the toughest of times. Talk to your insurance agent, banker and vendors about these issues from time to time and you’ll be better off when things go wrong.

Steven E. Bryant is executive director of the Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College — Bloomington. Next week, Talisha Coppock with Downtown Bloomington Inc. will share her thoughts.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

MS Walk planned for Saturday

MS Walk planned for Saturday

By Christy Mullins 331-4266 | cmullins@heraldt.com
March 22, 2012

A local multiple sclerosis support group will hold an MS Walk this Saturday at Ivy Tech Community College.

The walk starts at 10 a.m. at the main campus, 200 Daniels Way. Registration is at 9 a.m.

All proceeds will go to the National MS Society, although the walk is not affiliated with the society, organizer Tammie Lawrence said.

Lawrence said Saturday’s walk is the first known walk in Bloomington’s history to support the research of multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. An estimated 400,000 people in the country have been diagnosed with MS, including 8,000 in Indiana alone, according to the MS Society.

There have been similar walks in Terre Haute, Columbus and Indianapolis, but not in Bloomington, Lawrence said. “The National MS Society has not had proof that Bloomington could have a successful walk, so we decided to hold our own and donate the money.”

She hopes the walk will become annual, with enough turnout.

Walkers can go one mile or three, after paying a $10 participation fee. The group also will accept monetary donations and checks made to the National MS Society, Lawrence said.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

Ivy Tech Bloomington marketing wins gold at national conference

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 21, 2012

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus wins gold at national marketing conference

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus marketing department was awarded a Gold Paragon for its 2011 marketing efforts at the National Council of Marketing and Public Relations Professionals (NCMPR) annual conference on March 13, 2012, in San Francisco, CA.

Out of 1800 entries nationwide and 80 judges at the conference, Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was awarded the Gold Paragon for the Foundation Annual Report. The same piece won a Bronze Medallion award at the annual regional NCMPR conference held last fall in Detroit, MI.  

Over the last four years, Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus has earned 30 national and regional NCMPR awards– 14 national and 16 regional – for marketing campaigns and communication designs. Last fall, the campus brought home three regional Gold Medallion awards, which include Gold for Media Success Story (Ivy Tech Waldron Dedication), Gold for Government/Community Relations Communications (Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship), and Gold for Academic Catalog (The Center for Lifelong Learning).

This year’s national award-winning piece can be seen online at http://www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/report/Annual_Report_2010.pdf.

NCMPR (www.ncmpr.org) is a professional organization for individuals involved in marketing, communications, public relations and enrollment management at community, junior and technical colleges. NCMPR provides professional development opportunities, advocates on behalf of the profession and the institutions it serves, and recognizes professional excellence.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Commentator to Speak at O’Bannon Institute Event

InsideINdianaBusiness.com Report

Ivy Tech Community College says ABC News political commentator Cokie Roberts will speak at the annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service in Bloomington next month. Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist George Will is scheduled to deliver the keynote address.

March 20, 2012
News Release

Bloomington, Ind. – Cokie Roberts, political commentator for ABC News, will capstone Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s ninth annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service with a closing conversation on Friday, April 27 at 2:30 p.m. The closing conversation will take place following Institute panels on Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. The event theme for this year’s Institute is “America the Dutiful – The Questions that Occupy U.S.”

George F. Will, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, will headline the Institute’s fundraising dinner on Thursday, April 26 at the Bloomington Monroe County Convention Center. Tickets are still available at $100 per person, a portion of which is tax deductible. Proceeds benefit the Ivy Tech-Bloomington Center for Civic Engagement.

Each year, as part of the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff participate in a Day of Service in our communities and that will take place on Thursday, April 26 beginning at 8 a.m. To kick off O’Bannon Institute events, Ivy Tech-Bloomington will host its annual Civic Engagement Awards on Wednesday, April 25 to recognize faculty, staff, and community partners for excellence in volunteerism.

The O’Bannon Institute launched nine years ago by Ivy Tech-Bloomington is an annual opportunity for the community to come together to discuss topics related to nonprofits, education and political and civic service. Previous speakers at the Institute have included former U.S. Senators, Pulitzer prize-winning authors, Governors, political advisers and columnists, and Laura W. Bush, former First Lady of the United States.

O’Bannon Institute fundraising dinner tickets can be purchased online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu or by contacting Tina Phelps, Assistant to the Chancellor, at (812) 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu.
Admission for Friday’s Institute panels and conversation at Ivy Tech is with a canned good or free-will donation for Hoosier Hills Food Bank.

Reservations are required and can be made at http://obannon.ivytech.edu and then click “Tickets,” or by contacting Tina Phelps at 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu.
O’Bannon Institute speaker information and schedules can be found online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu.

Speaker Bios:

Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News. From 1996-2002 she and Sam Donaldson co-anchored the weekly ABC interview program This Week. Ms. Roberts also serves as Senior News Analyst for National Public Radio. In her more than forty years in broadcasting, she has won countless awards, including three Emmys. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame, and was cited by the American Women in Radio and Television as one of the fifty greatest women in the history of broadcasting.

Will is today’s most widely read columnist. His newspaper column has been syndicated by The Washington Post since 1974. It currently appears in 400 newspapers in the United States and in Europe. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1977 for commentary for his columns. Altogether, eight collections of Will’s Newsweek and Washington Post columns have been published, the most recent being One Man’s America. He became a founding panel member on ABC television’s This Week in 1981.

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Cokie Roberts to capstone O’Bannon Institute at Ivy Tech

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 20, 2012                                                  

Cokie Roberts to capstone O’Bannon Institute at Ivy Tech

Cokie Roberts, political commentator for ABC News, will capstone Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s ninth annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service with a closing conversation on Friday, April 27 at 2:30 p.m. The closing conversation will take place following Institute panels on Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. The event theme for this year’s Institute is “America the Dutiful – The Questions that Occupy U.S.”

George F. Will, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, will headline the Institute’s fundraising dinner on Thursday, April 26 at the Bloomington Monroe County Convention Center. Tickets are still available at $100 per person, a portion of which is tax deductible. Proceeds benefit the Ivy Tech-Bloomington Center for Civic Engagement.

Each year, as part of the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff participate in a Day of Service in our communities and that will take place on Thursday, April 26 beginning at 8 a.m. To kick off O’Bannon Institute events, Ivy Tech-Bloomington will host its annual Civic Engagement Awards on Wednesday, April 25 to recognize faculty, staff, and community partners for excellence in volunteerism.

The O’Bannon Institute launched nine years ago by Ivy Tech-Bloomington is an annual opportunity for the community to come together to discuss topics related to nonprofits, education and political and civic service. Previous speakers at the Institute have included former U.S. Senators, Pulitzer prize-winning authors, Governors, political advisers and columnists, and Laura W. Bush, former First Lady of the United States.

O’Bannon Institute fundraising dinner tickets can be purchased online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu or by contacting Tina Phelps, Assistant to the Chancellor, at (812) 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu

Admission for Friday’s Institute panels and conversation at Ivy Tech is with a canned good or free-will donation for Hoosier Hills Food Bank. Reservations are required and can be made at http://obannon.ivytech.edu and then click “Tickets,” or by contacting Tina Phelps at 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu.

O’Bannon Institute speaker information and schedules can be found online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu

Speaker Bios:

Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News. From 1996-2002 she and Sam Donaldson co-anchored the weekly ABC interview program This Week. Ms. Roberts also serves as Senior News Analyst for National Public Radio. In her more than forty years in broadcasting, she has won countless awards, including three Emmys. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame, and was cited by the American Women in Radio and Television as one of the fifty greatest women in the history of broadcasting.

Will is today’s most widely read columnist. His newspaper column has been syndicated by The Washington Post since 1974. It currently appears in 400 newspapers in the United States and in Europe.  He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1977 for commentary for his columns. Altogether, eight collections of Will’s Newsweek and Washington Post columns have been published, the most recent being One Man’s America. He became a founding panel member on ABC television’s This Week in 1981.

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.