Cokie Roberts speaks at Ivy Tech, stresses need for political compromise

Cokie Roberts speaks at Ivy Tech, stresses need for political compromise

NPR/ABC news analyst featured at O’Bannon Institute

By Laura Lane 331-4362 | llane@heraldt.com
April 28, 2012

When National Public Radio and ABC news analyst Cokie Roberts was a kid growing up in the hallways of Congress, Republicans and Democrats sometimes compromised on big issues, standing together occasionally as political foes united for a cause or for change.

When former Republican President Gerald Ford was U.S. House minority leader and her late father, Democrat Hale Boggs, was the majority leader, they were “best friends,” she said, who on shared cab rides to Capitol Hill discussed what they would later in the day argue about. There was give and take.

That art of political compromise, Roberts said Friday afternoon during a discussion at Ivy Tech Community College, has been lost.

“That’s just gone,” she said. “The ability to seek and find a consensus. That’s the most important thing politically. You can’t get anything done now. You can’t stand and say, ‘My way or the highway’ if you’re not the only person in the room.”

She said that during this presidential primary season, candidates are finding no common ground. When asked if politicians will ever step across party lines to join forces, she said voters will decide.

“In the end, voters will have to reward people who compromise,” Roberts said.

The Emmy Award winner and best-selling author sat on stage for an hour with Herald-Times Editor Bob Zaltsberg and answered questions on topics ranging from Newt Gingrich — she called his attempt to become “emperor” and his support from the religious right “mind-boggling” — to progression of the gay marriage movement. “The majority of people today support gay marriage,” she said, “and it’s because brave gay people said to their friends (who opposed it) that, ‘You’re talking about me.’”

The talk focused on politics. Roberts praised two Indiana lawmakers she has gotten to know in decades covering Washington. She called former U.S. Rep. Lee Hamilton “a truly wonderful member of Congress” whose word could be trusted, no matter what. And she said U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar, a Republican facing his first primary opponent in more than three decades, has made “extraordinary contributions” and that the Senate would suffer with his loss.

Roberts, who said she “grew up in a household where politics was the family business,” never set out to follow the career she chose. But she fell into it when she met her husband of 45 years, Steve Roberts. “It never occurred to me to be a journalist,” she said. “Then I met my husband, who was always going to be a journalist. It was easier to switch than fight.”

She said it’s difficult to pinpoint her favorite interview. But easy to remember the worst. “Ross Perot,” she said, recalling a live 1992 Nightline show where Perot, who had unexpectedly pulled out of the presidential race, was the lone guest. “He kept getting testier and testier and testier.” She feared he might stand up and walk out, leaving her there alone. He stayed.

Later, in a phone conversation, Roberts accused Perot of being rude to her on the show. “And just to make the point,” she said, “he hung up.”


About the institute

Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service kicked off Wednesday with an awards program, followed by Thursday’s volunteer events and the annual fundraising dinner. This year’s featured speaker was Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist George Will. Friday’s events included panel discussions and a conversation with political analyst Cokie Roberts.

Journalist Cokie Roberts talks with Judy O’Bannon before her appearance Friday at Ivy Tech Community College. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Journalist Cokie Roberts talks about the current state of American politics during her appearance at Ivy Tech Community College. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

Will voices some hope for America, none for the Cubs

Will voices some hope for America, none for the Cubs

By Christy Mullins
331-4266 | cmullins@heraldt.com
April 27, 2012

George Will, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist on politics and national best-selling author on baseball, would not predict Thursday who will be the next president of the United States.

But he did say this: Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels was his top choice.

At Thursday night’s annual fundraising dinner for Ivy Tech Community College’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, guest speaker Will said he was disappointed when the Republican governor called him last May and said he wouldn’t run for office.

“Since then, I haven’t had a dog in this fight,” Will said.

About 400 people attended the dinner at the Bloomington/Monroe County Convention Center. A large handful clapped in agreement.

Will spewed voting statistics, minority percentages and political trivia throughout his hour-and-a-half-long speech.

His message, overall, was grave.

Every 10 seconds, the United States government goes more than $500,000 into debt, he said. To put that into perspective, Bill Gates could write a check worth his entire network of assets, and “he still couldn’t even pay two months’ interest on the national debt.”

Will said that’s because American families have adopted the spending habits of the American government. Spend, and see what happens.

Home equity loans, too many credit cards, and overspending have put the American economy in a lost era, Will said. “Americans can’t separate the pleasure of purchasing something from the pain of paying for it.”

Will said Americans have become too dependent on government, especially Social Security and Medicaid. He used Ida May Fuller, the first American to receive a monthly benefit Social Security check, as an example.

Fuller had worked just long enough and had paid a total $22 into the Social Security program.

“Then, in an act of recklessness, she lived to be 100,” Will said. The woman collected more than $24,000 in Social Security benefits before she died.

“Social Security was never designed for a world like this,” where people live longer and the money doesn’t last, Will said.

He also decried the nation’s tax code, calling it “codified envy.”

“Envy is not fun,” Will said. “It’s the only one of the Seven Deadly Sins that doesn’t give the sinner even momentary pleasure.”

Still, Will said, “Things, I think, are going to get better. We are not Bangladesh. We can get better by choosing to get better. We can get better by choosing to make better choices.”

In a question-and-answer portion, one Ivy Tech student asked Will if an associate’s degree is enough to get a job in the current economy.

Will suggested staying in school.

“Two hundred years ago, the source of wealth was land. We essentially gave it away,” he said. “Today, it’s human capital … education. Get some loans and stay in school.”

Another audience member asked Will if he would ever run for political office.

“No, never,” he replied. “A, it would cut into my baseball. B, I’m too old. C, I live in Maryland. Only three other Republicans live there.”

Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan asked whether the Cubs would ever win the World Series.

“The Cubs have not won the World Series since 1908 — that’s two years before Tolstoy died,” Will said. “No, no, it’s hopeless.”

Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service kicked off Wednesday with an awards program and continued into Thursday with a volunteer day for students, faculty and staff.

Today, the community college will host panel discussions with political analyst Cokie Roberts in the Ivy Tech Bloomington Student Commons.

Judy O’Bannon, left, and Ivy Tech Chancellor John Whikehart, center, listen as George Will talks about the books he has on his cellphone. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Award ceremony part of Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute

Award ceremony part of Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute

By Dann Denny 331-4350 | ddenny@heraldt.com
April 26, 2012

When students in Robert Soto’s Ivy Tech cultural diversity class conducted a “life history project,” which involved interviewing Bell Trace residents about their lives and preserving the interviews on film for their families, they came across a woman in her upper 80s who said she could never cook worth a darn.

“She said she covered up her poor cooking by using fancy china and serving lots of wine,” Soto said.

The woman, a psychiatric nurse, also said she once witnessed a psychiatric doctor inadvertently lick some LSD off his finger.

“He really started tripping,” she said.

Soto was one of several people honored during Ivy Tech’s Civic Engagement Awards ceremony Wednesday afternoon in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, an event that kicked off Ivy Tech’s three-day O’Bannon Institute for Community Service event by honoring faculty, staff and student volunteers, as well as community partners.

“I would like to congratulate and thank this year’s civic engagement award winners, and all Ivy Tech volunteers, for making volunteer contributions to our community possible,” said John Whikehart, Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus chancellor.

Whikehart said Ivy Tech’s commitment to service learning and civic engagement is evidenced by its collective contributions to the community, pointing out that in the past year Ivy Tech’s service learning and community service hours totaled nearly 46,000 hours for a contribution of about $894,000 to area communities.

He said this spring, Ivy Tech accounting class volunteers served more than 700 clients by preparing taxes through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, and generated a college record of $1.2 million in federal refunds for those clients.

Soto, one of three recipients of the Faculty Excellence in Service Learning award, said he launched the “life history project” to show students the older generation has plenty to teach them.

“I think doing the project helped most of them realize that’s true,” he said. “One girl said she felt spoiled that she didn’t have to fetch her own water.”

Daniel Stec was given the Excellence in Student Volunteerism award for several volunteer activities, such as his participation in Ivy Tech’s Alternative Spring Break 2011, during which he and 11 other Ivy Tech students spent spring break week in an impoverished Mexican village, helping to put concrete floors in homes.

“We also took shoes collected here and distributed them to kids,” he said. “We actually got to fit the kids with the shoes. It was really a great experience.”

Stec also made two mission trips to Haiti with his home church, New Community Church in Martinsville; and volunteered as first the local coordinator and then the regional adviser for the International Student Exchange, a nonprofit organization that finds host families for international students who have come to study in the United States.

Here are the other award winners:

The Community Partner award, honoring an organization the college works with throughout the year, went to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Bloomington, which hosted community work studies, Ivy Tech AmeriCorps students and interns. Recently, the organization partnered with Ivy Tech’s poetry class on a service learning project called Art into Poetry.

The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center Community Partner award went to the Bloomington Playwrights Project. In addition to the Ivy Tech/Bloomington Playwrights educational partnership over the past year, BPP has played a significant role in strengthening the arts, economy and community.

The Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship award went to the Cook CEO Roundtable. Recently, the group formed an alliance with the center, and individual members made an investment to replace a valued tree in Bryan Park that belonged to a resident after vandals had cut it down.

Recipients of the other two faculty Excellence in Service Learning award were Roy Elkes and Steve Englert, for their leadership efforts in the VITA program (a learning staple for Ivy Tech accounting students since 2004).

The Excellence in Faculty/Staff Volunteerism award went to Steve Hanson for his work with the Homeward Bound Walk to benefit the poor and homeless. Additionally, Hanson has served for the past three years as director of the Monroe Tournament Division of USA Bassin Next Generation, a youth fishing tournament. In 2011, winners were offered $21,000 in college scholarships.

The Jeanine C. Rae Humanitarian award went to Jerrilyn Zeigler for her positive attitude and commitment to Ivy Tech through her student life involvement. She is a student ambassador, Student Government Association member and volunteer. Zeigler attended Alternative Spring Break 2011 and will be attending Western Kentucky University when she leaves Ivy Tech.


O’Bannon Institute events

Ivy Tech Community College’s 2012 O’Bannon Institute for Community Service in Bloomington began Wednesday and runs through Friday.

Thursday, 150 Ivy Tech volunteers will participate in a Day of Service, working with agencies in Bloomington and area communities. Volunteer locations include Red Cross Blood Drive, Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Early Head Start, Head Start, IU Health and Safety Fair at the Morgan County Fairgrounds, Bloomington Animal Shelter, City of Bloomington—Wapahani Bike Trail and Pages to Prisoners.

Thursday night, more than 400 people at the convention center will hear Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist George Will (ticket sales are closed).

Friday, panel discussions are planned at Ivy Tech.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

O’Bannon event sets great example of citizenship, leadership and service

O’Bannon event sets great example of citizenship, leadership and service

Our opinion
April 26, 2012

The headlining events of the Ivy Tech O’Bannon Institute for Community Service are the nationally known speakers who come to town. This year, syndicated columnist George Will and ABC and NPR journalist Cokie Roberts join a long list of previous O’Bannon guests including former First Lady Laura Bush, former presidential candidate George McGovern, and an impressive selection of well-known public servants and journalists.

Also each year, engaging groups of panelists cover a variety of topics of importance to the community and civic engagement.

With all that, the crux of the O’Bannon Institute’s message is embodied in other lower-profile activities that occur this week. Awards were handed out Wednesday that helped illustrate how Ivy Tech students were able to log nearly 46,000 hours of service learning and community service in the past year. The volunteer efforts contributed nearly $900,000 to community organizations.

In addition, 150 Ivy Tech students were scheduled to volunteer in “Day of Service” activities today at various locations throughout area communities.

The O’Bannon Institute each year helps focus on one of the strengths of the Ivy Tech Bloomington campus — its unwavering commitment to being a good citizen and active participant in the community through its students, faculty and staff. The event sets a good example for everyone.


George Will

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Civic Engagement Awards ceremony to kick off 2012 O’Bannon Institute on Wednesday evening

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 23, 2012

Civic Engagement Awards ceremony to kick off 2012 O’Bannon Institute on Wednesday evening

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus will kick-off its annual signature O’Bannon Institute for Community Service three-day event by honoring faculty, staff, and student volunteers, as well as community partners during its Civic Engagement Awards ceremony on Wednesday, April 25 at 4 p.m., held in the Hoosier Times Student Commons in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building.

“Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s commitment to service learning and civic engagement is evidenced by its collective contributions to the community,” John Whikehart, Chancellor of Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus said. “In the past year, Ivy Tech’s service learning and community service hours total nearly 46,000 hours for a contribution of approximately $894,000 in our communities.”

Just this spring, Ivy Tech accounting class volunteers served over 700 clients by preparing taxes through the VITA program, and generated a college record of $1,200,000 in federal refunds for those clients.

Award categories for the 2012 O’Bannon Institute Civic Engagement awards ceremony include Community Partner Award, the new Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center Community Partner Award, the new Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship Community Partner Award, Excellence in Service Learning, Excellence in Volunteerism, and the Jeanine C. Rae Humanitarian Award.

The Community Partner awards honor organizations that the college works with throughout the year.

  • The first recipient is Boys and Girls Clubs. They have hosted community work studies, Ivy Tech AmeriCorps students, and interns. Recently, the organization partnered with Ivy Tech’s poetry class on a service learning project, Art into Poetry.
  • The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center Community Partner award goes to the Bloomington Playwrights Project. In addition to the Ivy Tech/BPP educational partnership over the last year, BPP has played a significant role in strengthening the arts, economy, and the community.
  • The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship award goes to Cook CEO Roundtable. Recently the group formed an alliance with the Center, and individual members made an investment to replace a valued tree that belonged to a resident in Bryan Park after vandals cut it down.

Recipients of the faculty Service Learning award are Roy Elkes and Steve Englert for their leadership efforts in the VITA program. Since 2004, VITA has been a learning “staple” for Ivy Tech accounting students.

Additionally, Robert Soto has been awarded for his Ivy Tech cultural diversity class Life History Project. His students interviewed residents of Bell Trace about their lives and preserved the interviews for families of the residents.

Excellence in Faculty/Staff Volunteerism award goes to Steve Hanson for his work with Homeward Bound to benefit the homeless. Additionally, Hanson has served for the past three years as director of the Monroe Tournament Division of USA Bassin Next Generation, a youth fishing tournament. In 2011, the classic tournament offered $21,000 in college scholarships to winners.

Recipient of the Student Volunteerism award goes to Daniel Stec for his participation in Alternative Spring Break 2011, as well as participating in two mission trips to Haiti with his church. He is involved with Student Leadership Academy, Campus Activities Board, and nursing club. Stec also works for International Student Exchange, a nonprofit organization, finding host families for students traveling to study in the United States.

The Jeanine C. Rae Humanitarian award recipient is Jerrilyn Zeigler for her positive attitude and commitment to Ivy Tech through her student life involvement. She is a student ambassador, SGA member, and volunteer. Zeigler attended Alternative Spring Break 2011 and will be attending Western Kentucky University when she leaves Ivy Tech.

“I would like to congratulate and thank this year’s civic engagement award winners, and all Ivy Tech volunteers, for making volunteer contributions to our community possible,” said Whikehart.

More information about the annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service can be found online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu.

Information about Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Center for Civic Engagement can be found at online www.ivytech.edu/civicengagement.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech culinary students baking goods for community fundraiser

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 19, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s culinary students have been invited to bake gluten free and diabetic friendly goods for a fundraising event to benefit the Middleway House, a nonprofit social service agency, hosted by Goods for Cooks. Seven Ivy Tech student volunteers will take part in baking alternative items for the bake sale to be held downtown, on the square, on Saturday, April 21.

“We usually introduce gluten free baking concepts in our Introduction to Baking course,” said Jeffrey Taber, Ivy Tech-Bloomington Assistant Professor and Hospitality Program Chair. “Once the students are familiar with the techniques in normal baking, we introduce alternatives for people who cannot enjoy usual baked goods.”

Taber says that students use alternative grains such as rice and tapioca, and use Splenda and agave syrup as sweeteners in their baked goods.

The gluten free baked goods that Ivy Tech Culinary volunteers will provide for this Saturday’s bake sale include a Crusty French Baguette, Brownies, Shortbread, Dark Chocolate Torte, Rosemary Crackers, and Carrot Cake Cupcakes.  Ingredients include rice flour, coconut flour, almond flour and other alternatives.

“These items not only meet diabetic friendly and gluten free guidelines, but taste delicious as well,” Taber said.

For more information about Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Hospitality degree program options, including Culinary, visit www.ivytech.edu/academics.

Call to strike: Ivy Tech production packs a punch

THEATER REVIEW: ‘WAITING FOR LEFTY’

Call to strike: Ivy Tech production packs a punch

By Doris Lynch H-T Reviewer
April 17, 2012

Under Paul Daily’s fine direction, this first production by Ivy Tech Community College, “Waiting for Lefty,” energetically presented a classic from the 1930s, a time period that shares many similarities with our own. In short but powerful vignettes, 14 (mostly young) actors offered strong performances of workers debating the pros and cons of a strike. Also included were stories of a doctor and a chemist fighting against an unfair system, and risking their livelihoods in the process.

Setting the mood, the ushers wore knickers, suspenders, old-fashioned dress shirts and caps. Nathaniel Alcock (Fayette) played banjo and harmonica while belting out Woody Guthrie and other Depression-era folk songs.

The playwright Odets designed the clever staging: actors stationed among audience members, where they shouted out opinions, disputes, ayes and nays. Dismantling the fourth wall worked well by involving the audience and inspiring the actors to really feel their roles.

Somewhat disorienting was the beginning, in which there was no clear demarcation between when the play officially started and when characters finished greeting each other at a union meeting.

Ian Martin (Fatt), with his booming voice and commanding presence, made anti-strike Fatt a believable and intimidating foe of the pro-strike contingent.

As Agate Keller, Jacob Duffy Halbleib was particularly memorable, using his body to express urgency and to rally the taxi drivers to vote for the strike.

Saturday night, several actors’ dialogue seemed rushed, but everyone delivered their lines with strong feeling. Daily’s direction placed several characters almost in each other’s faces, close enough to spit their arguments at each other.

In fact, this yelling and tension led to some fist pummeling. Two fight scenes were executed efficiently and dramatically under Adam Nobel’s fight choreography.

Two particularly moving vignettes involved family scenes. In the first Edna (Patricia Rochell) passionately presses her husband, Joe, (played forcibly by Ian Ketcham) to fight for the union because the 5 bucks a week he’s making now will soon become only $3. And their two children already suffer from rickets from lack of milk.

A welcome romantic interlude between Florence (Cara Thompson) and Sid (Nick Johnson) makes upfront and personal Odets’ message that poor pay hurts everyone. Thompson’s Florence shows a caring, strong woman. As Sid, Johnson displays a tender kindness and an almost repressed longing. Their love becomes palpable in a dance scene. Heartbreakingly, both are smart enough to realize that a marriage between them won’t work unless they can earn a living wage.

John Whikehart played a conflicted Barnes, a doctor who emphasized that medical care was not under the control of doctors. He tries to persuade young, idealistic Dr. Benjamin (David Chervony) that he needs to compromise to survive in the working world, but Benjamin rebuffs him.

Barbara Abbott’s costumes captured the ’30s street urchin look and businessman attire of that era including skinny, polka-dotted ties and a pork-pie hat.

Shane Cinal transformed the Waldron’s Rose Firebay into a palette of light and dark grays: bricks, an American flag, and a Transportation Union insignia completed the wall decor.

Ivy Tech’s rendition of “Lefty” was stirring as people all around you — even next to you — demanded a strike or urged caution. These actors — some of them first-timers — gave fine performances. For political theater with punch and relevance, go see this show.


If you go

WHO: Ivy Tech Community College.

WHAT: “Waiting for Lefty,” a play by Clifford Odets.

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday; 2 p.m. Saturday. WHERE: Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center’s Rose Firebay, 122 S. Walnut St., Bloomington.

TICKETS: $15 general admission and $5 for students/seniors; available at the Buskirk-Chumley box office at 114 E. Kirkwood Ave., 812-323-3020, or by visiting www.bctboxoffice.com.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington alumni, Chris Reinhart, named a national Udall Scholar

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 16, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington alumni, Chris Reinhart, named a national Udall Scholar

Chris Reinhart, 2010 Ivy Tech-Bloomington alumni and Ball State University architecture major, has been named a 2012 Udall Scholar. Reinhart is the first BSU architecture major ever to receive the Udall Scholarship, the nation’s most important environmental scholarship, aimed specifically at juniors and seniors who show promise of becoming future environmental leaders. In addition to receiving a $5000 Udall Scholarship award, he has been invited to Tucson, AZ this summer for Udall Scholars Week.

“The Udall Scholarship is a tremendous honor for anyone in the environmental realm,” said Sarah Cote, Ivy Tech-Bloomington Associate Professor of Biotechnology, who wrote a letter of recommendation for Reinhart. “They receive hundreds of applications and only select 80 recipients. This is a national program and a huge honor.”

During his time at Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus, Reinhart was active in the Ecology Club, serving as president. Most notably, the club launched a recycling bin campaign that doubled the recycling containers on main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, which is a 145,000 sq. ft. space.

“I stress the idea that ‘trash’ is concept that human beings must move beyond – we are the only life form on earth that makes products that do not feed a natural cycle,” Reinhart said.

Reinhart was chosen as an Ivy Tech-Bloomington 2010 Commencement address speaker. He talked about the work of the Ecology Club and thanked his most influential teachers; Kirk Barnes, Dean of the School of Technology; Sarah Cote, Associate Professor, Biotechnology; and Olga Lucia Vargas-Lammana, adjunct faculty in design technology.

In addition to being named a 2010 Commencement address speaker, he was awarded the campus Jeanine C. Rae Humanitarian Award and the Outstanding Student Award in the Design Technology program.

“Chris found his calling in the architecture courses at Ivy Tech,” said Kirk Barnes, Dean of the Ivy Tech-Bloomington School of Technology. “He used his previous building experience along with his passion for the environment to envision how they can coexist and improve the interaction between architecture and environment.”

Reinhart earned his Associate of Applied Science in Design Technology with a focus on Architecture, and graduated summa cum laude for maintaining a 4.0 grade point average.

“Ivy Tech made it possible for me to return to academia after a decade-long hiatus,” he said. “When I started taking classes again, I was working, and the flexible schedule allowed me to ease my way back into the life of a full-time student.”

Currently, he is pursuing a career in sustainable architecture, focusing on issues of waste, sustainable materials, and equitable housing at the BSU School of Architecture in Muncie, Ind.

“I built my home of earth, straw bales, timbers and other natural and salvaged materials,” he said. “Currently, I’m creating an outdoor bar built of earth and glass bottles at Be Here Now, a music venue in Muncie.”

Reinhart has a ten year-old son, likes skipping rocks at the creek, and strumming a ukulele.

The U.S. Congress established the Udall Foundation as an independent executive branch agency in 1992 to honor Morris K. Udall’s 30 years of service in the U.S. House of Representatives. In 2009, Congress enacted legislation to honor Stewart L. Udall and add his name to the Foundation. It is now known as the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation.

Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, economics, and other related fields; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy, including fields related to tribal sovereignty, tribal governance, tribal law, Native American education, Native American justice, natural resource management, cultural preservation and revitalization, Native American economic development, and other areas affecting Native American communities; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care, including health care administration, social work, medicine, dentistry, counseling, and research into health conditions affecting Native American communities, and other related fields.

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Volunteer numbers tell a good story

Volunteer numbers tell a good story

Our opinion
April 10, 2012

Last week, we wrote about the Be More Awards, which honors the community’s volunteers. It’s fitting this week to note national figures that show Bloomington far ahead of the norm when it comes to volunteering.

As reported in a story Monday, one survey found that the average volunteer rate in Bloomington is 34 percent, compared with 28 percent for Indiana and 26 percent for the country. Other data found Bloomington residents volunteered 50 hours per resident in 2010, while the per-person average was 37 hours in Indiana and 34 hours in the U.S.

The massive volunteer pools of students at Indiana University and Ivy Tech Community College help, as does the large number of retirees who want to contribute their time and energy.

Whatever the reasons, the figures tell a compelling story of selfless people who reach out to help when others are in need.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Bloomington above average in volunteerism, surveys show

Bloomington above average in volunteerism, surveys show

By Dann Denny 331-4350 | ddenny@heraldt.com
April 9, 2012

The statistics don’t lie. Bloomington is a volunteering community.

More people in Bloomington volunteer per capita than both Indiana and national averages, according to a recent Corporation for National and Community survey — which found that the average volunteer rate in Bloomington is 34 percent, compared with 28 percent for Indiana and 26 percent for the country.

Want more proof? How about the 2010 Volunteering in America Report, which shows that Bloomington residents volunteered 50 hours per resident in 2010, while the per-person average was 37 hours in Indiana and 34 hours in the U.S.

Still skeptical? Well, the 81 local organizations that responded to the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network’s 2011 survey reported a total of 437,885 volunteer hours logged locally.

Using Independent Sector’s estimate of the dollar value of volunteer time, Bloomington volunteers at those reporting agencies provided services valued at more than $7.5 million.

“The statistics are completely believable,” said Bet Savich, director of the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network. “I’ve always felt that people volunteer here more than in other communities, so I’m not surprised by this data.”

Savich said part of the explanation lies in the fact that Bloomington has a massive volunteer pool of college students at Indiana University and Ivy Tech Community College.

She cited the IU Kelley School of Business’s student-run Civic Leadership Development program and SPEA’s Students Taking Active Roles Today program, which encourage students to get involved in volunteerism.

“These programs give nonprofits what they need in terms of volunteers, but also help students learn a service ethic and become leaders in service,” she said. “IU also has the Adopt a Nonprofit Program, in which residence halls are matched to a community nonprofit.”

The National Survey of Student Engagement found that 70 percent of IU seniors reported they volunteered during their college career. According to a 2010 survey of local nonprofits released by the federal Corporation for National and Community Service, 83 percent of the respondents said they considered IU student volunteers either essential, very important or important to their operational success.

Ivy Tech’s staff, faculty and students reported 18,000 volunteer hours at more than 80 organizations and agencies across its six-county service area last year, and the campus was named for five consecutive years to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. Savich said Ivy Tech students do volunteer work on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, help fix used appliances at Habitat ReStore, and take part in Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, a three-day event that includes an award ceremony honoring students, faculty and staff for civic engagement, a fundraising dinner with a speaker who talks about civic engagement and political participation, and a day of panel discussions.

Community members, too

But Savich said that even if you removed college students from Bloomington’s landscape, the city would still have a strong spirit of volunteerism.

“This is a caring, grass-roots community,” she said. “Once it learns that something needs to be done, community members get in there and do it. Bloomington has a lot of people who’ve traveled and seen what other communities have done in terms of arts or social services or animal welfare, and they’re not afraid to get their hands dirty and get something started here.”

But why are Bloomingtonians so generous with their spare time? The Corporation for National and Community Service’s survey found that high volunteer rates correlated with high education levels, short commute times and a robust nonprofit infrastructure — all of which can be found in Bloomington.

“Our nonprofits would not be able to do what they do without volunteers,” Savich said. “It’s not just the hours that the volunteers provide. It’s also the skills they bring, and the heart and effort they put into it.”

Volunteers still needed

Savich said the Bloomington Volunteer Network, which has 225 member agencies, connects people with nonprofits and volunteer opportunities in the community. It posts volunteer opportunities on its website, http://bloomington.in.gov/volunteer, which gets more than 2,000 unique visitors per month.

“We still need more volunteers,” Savich said. “There are more than 200 volunteer positions open at any given time. Every week, we put out a newsletter in which we identify five current volunteer needs. The need is always greater when the IU students are gone.”

Savich said many people mistakenly believe if they volunteer, they have to make a weekly or monthly commitment to a nonprofit.

“If you are a snowbird or like to leave town regularly, nonprofits will work with you,” she said. “We’re a very mobile community, and nonprofits completely understand that.”


In this photo from January, Myles Adams, a Bloomington High School North Habitat for Humanity volunteer, helps build roof trusses for a shed at a Habitat house on Thornton Drive in Bloomington. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

See the 1930s come to life in two local college productions

Theater

See the 1930s come to life in two local college productions

By Joel Pierson H-T Columnist
April 8, 2012

Hard to believe the IU theater season is already coming to a close. It’s been quite a year, and they’re going out with a bang: Kander and Ebb’s iconic musical, “Cabaret,” under the direction of George Pinney and Jay Ivey.

The history of “Cabaret” goes back to a 1939 novella, which was followed by a 1951 play about the denizens of Germany’s racy Kit Kat Klub in the early 1930s. It focuses on the relationship of American writer Clifford Bradshaw and English singer Sally Bowles.

Director George Pinney says, “‘Cabaret’ is an enticingly dark story of the human condition. People tend to want to stay in their safe little worlds to escape everyday trials as well as national and international concerns. To continue life as if it is a party, until the bubble bursts and no one wants to take responsibility but is ready at the quick to blame others.

“The cabaret is a central metaphor of how humans tend to want to avoid life’s responsibilities, to dance and sing on a spinning merry-go-round, blurring the outside world and anesthetizing body and soul with liquor, drugs and sex.”

Indeed, I must officially go on record as saying that avoiding responsibilities through the use of liquor and sex is bad! That’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.

“Cabaret” is one of those musicals where people usually know only one or two songs, typically “Wilkommen” from the show’s opening and “Cabaret” (as in “life is a . old chum”) from the ending.

In between, the musical is packed with two dozen more songs, intricate choreography, amazing costumes, and sizzling passion. The 1967 Broadway production snagged eight Tony Awards, including Best Musical, and 45 years later, it’s still as vibrant as ever.

It’s been a powerful season of theater for Indiana University, and “Cabaret” is poised to send them out in style. For some of the cast, it will be auf wiedersehen after this show, so come celebrate by watching them ply their trade.

If you go

WHO: Indiana University Department of Theatre and Drama

WHAT: “Cabaret” by John Kander, Joe Masteroff and Fred Ebb

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 17 — 21; 2 p.m. April 21

WHERE: Ruth N. Halls Theater, 275 N. Jordan Ave.

TICKETS: $10 — $25. Call 855-1103 or see www.theatre.indiana.edu

ACHTUNG, BABIES: “Cabaret” contains mature content. Is nicht for der kinder.

_______________________________________________________________________________

On strike at Ivy Tech

The mighty cream and crimson isn’t the only local institution of higher learning treading the boards this week.

In fact, it’s a historic week for Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, as they present their first student play at the John Waldron Arts Center that they helped save. They’ll be presenting Clifford Odets’ classic “Waiting for Lefty” in the Waldron’s Rose Firebay.

Like “Cabaret,” it is also from the 1930s, and it tells the tale of a group of cab drivers as they prepare to go on strike. Told as a series of seven distinct and interconnected vignettes, the cab drivers tell their stories as they await the arrival of Lefty, their appointed chairman.

Productions typically involve unusual storytelling techniques, such as planting actors in the audience to respond to things said on stage, breaking the fourth wall, and using minimalist staging techniques. This unconventional theatricality makes “Waiting for Lefty” a great learning tool for the student team.

“As a comprehensive community college, it is part of the mission of the Ivy Tech Bloomington campus to provide arts education and arts opportunities for students,” said Chancellor John Whikehart in a news release. The play’s director, Paul Daily, added, “Although the play is almost 80 years old and very much of its time, with the Occupy Movement and the Right to Work controversy, it is relevant again.”

I applaud the Ivy Tech team as they occupy their arts venue, and I encourage the community to share in what I hope will be the first of many productions to come.

If you go

WHO: Ivy Tech Community College- Bloomington

WHAT: “Waiting for Lefty” by Clifford Odets

WHERE: Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center’s Rose Firebay, 122 S. Walnut St., Bloomington

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 18-21; 2 p.m. April 21

TICKETS: $5 — $15. Available at the Buskirk-Chumley box office, 114 E. Kirkwood Ave., 812-323-3020 or www.bctboxoffice.com

Contact Joel by sending an email to features@heraldt.com with “Pierson” in the subject line.
Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

O’Bannon Institute panels to feature former member of Congress, labor and law activists, political commentators

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 9, 2012 

O’Bannon Institute panels to feature former member of Congress, labor and law activists, political commentators

The 2012 O’Bannon Institute for Community Service Panel Discussions at Ivy Tech-Bloomington will take place in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building throughout the day on Friday, April 27, and will feature discussions with a former member of Congress, labor and law activists, and political commentators.

Institute registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Panel discussions will follow opening remarks by Former Indiana First Lady, Judy O’Bannon. Discussions will focus specifically on how citizens view the modern political process and their elected officials, how organizations inspire supporters to become interested and active in a cause or movement, and a forecast of the 2012 Presidential elections and what issues will be hot as the summer and fall seasons approach.

The panel discussion schedule and member list is as follows:

Panel One: The Heroes We Love to Hate
9:30 a.m.
John Tanner, Former Member of Congress (D-TN); Vice Chairman, Prime Policy Group, Of Counsel to Miller & Martin, PLLC
Robert Vane, President, Veteran Strategies, Inc.; WRTV Commentator
Jennifer Wagner, President, Darvel Communications
Bruce Haynes, Founding Partner, Purple Strategies
Maureen Hayden, Statehouse Bureau Chief, CNHI
Moderator: Debby Knox, WISH News Anchor

Panel Two: The Art of Activism
11 a.m.
Guy Loftman, Attorney, former IU Student Body President, Anti-Vietnam War activist
Betty Cockrum, President and CEO, Planned Parenthood of Indiana
Mike Fichter, President and CEO, Indiana Right to Life
Joseph Varga, Ph.D., IU Professor of Labor Studies, former Teamster
Moderator: Chuck Carney, Director Communications and Media Relations, IU School of Education

Panel Three: The Drama of Obama v. ?
1:15 p.m.
Kip Tew, Partner, Krieg DeVault; 2008 Obama for America State Chair; WRTV Commentator; former Chairman, Marion Co. Democratic Party
Abdul-Hakim Shabazz, lawyer, former host of “Abdul in the Mornings” (WRTV commentator), Publisher of IndyPolitics.org
Fred Yang, Partner, Garin Hart Yang Research Group
Shira Toeplitz, Staff Writer, Roll Call, The Newspaper of Capitol Hill
Moderator: Ken Owen, Executive Director of Media Relations, DePauw University

Cokie Roberts, political commentator for ABC News, will capstone Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s ninth annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service with a closing conversation on Friday, April 27 at 2:30 p.m. in the Hoosier Times Student Commons.

George F. Will, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, will headline the Institute’s fundraising dinner on Thursday, April 26 at the Bloomington Monroe County Convention Center. Tickets are still available at $100 per person, a portion of which is tax deductible. Proceeds benefit the Ivy Tech-Bloomington Center for Civic Engagement.

Each year, as part of the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff participate in a Day of Service in our communities and that will take place on Thursday, April 26 beginning at 8 a.m. To kick off O’Bannon Institute events, Ivy Tech-Bloomington will host its annual Civic Engagement Awards on Wednesday, April 25 to recognize faculty, staff, and community partners for excellence in volunteerism.

The O’Bannon Institute launched nine years ago by Ivy Tech-Bloomington is an annual opportunity for the community to come together to discuss topics related to nonprofits, education and political and civic service. Previous speakers at the Institute have included former U.S. Senators, Pulitzer prize-winning authors, Governors, political advisers and columnists, and Laura W. Bush, former First Lady of the United States.

O’Bannon Institute fundraising dinner tickets can be purchased online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu or by contacting Tina Phelps at (812) 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu

Admission for Friday’s Institute panels and conversation at Ivy Tech is with a canned good or free-will donation for Hoosier Hills Food Bank. Reservations are required and can be made at http://obannon.ivytech.edu and then click “Tickets,” or by contacting Tina Phelps at 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu. Lunch is provided.

O’Bannon Institute speaker information and panel schedules can be found online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association. 

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Featured speaker bios:

Cokie Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News. From 1996-2002 she and Sam Donaldson co-anchored the weekly ABC interview program This Week. Ms. Roberts also serves as Senior News Analyst for National Public Radio. In her more than forty years in broadcasting, she has won countless awards, including three Emmys. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame, and was cited by the American Women in Radio and Television as one of the fifty greatest women in the history of broadcasting.

George F. Will is today’s most widely read columnist. His newspaper column has been syndicated by The Washington Post since 1974. It currently appears in 400 newspapers in the United States and in Europe.  He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1977 for commentary for his columns. Altogether, eight collections of Will’s Newsweek and Washington Post columns have been published, the most recent being One Man’s America. He became a founding panel member on ABC television’s This Week in 1981.

Businessman Lee Marchant gets Be More Award for lifetime of service

Businessman Lee Marchant gets Be More Award for lifetime of service

53 individuals, groups recognized for efforts to improve community
 

By Dann Denny 331-4350 | ddenny@heraldt.com
April 4, 2012

When Lee Marchant received a letter telling him he’d been nominated for a Be More Award, he didn’t know anything about the Be More Awards celebration, during which 53 individuals and groups in 10 categories were to be recognized for outstanding community service during the past year. And he didn’t really want to attend.

But Mark Moore, IU Health Bloomington Hospital’s president and CEO, used every ounce of his persuasive powers to talk him into going.

“OK Mark, for you I will go,” said Marchant, a local businessman who owns a number of corporations, including the Garden Villa Nursing Home and Indiana Home Health.

Now Marchant is glad he acquiesced. Tuesday night, before a packed crowd at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater, Marchant received the top honor — the Be More Dedicated award given for a lifetime of service.

“Those of you who know me well know I’m almost never at a loss for words,” he told an applauding audience. “I am so honored and so humbled and so happy. God bless you all.”

Marchant worked with IU Health Bloomington for more than 17 years, 12 on the board of directors. His 20-year involvement with Ivy Tech included positions on the college’s foundation board of directors, raising nearly $80 million during his tenure as chairman. He has also been a Salvation Army advisory board member for more than 25 years and an adviser to eight executive directors during that time.

“I never really considered anything I ever did as volunteering,” he said. “You just hope what you do makes some small contribution to an organization.”

The winners, all of whom had been nominated by community members, were selected by an independent panel of judges for their outstanding community service in the past year. The awards program is sponsored by the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, IU Credit Union, United Way of Monroe County and WTIU Public Television.

Mayor Mark Kruzan presented each honoree with a commemorative plaque; and MaryFrances McCourt, chairwoman of the board of directors of the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, presented each with a $500 check for the organization for which the recipient volunteered. A total of $5,000 was presented by the Community Foundation to community organizations through the Be More Awards. Marchant’s $500 award was split between the IU Health Bloomington Foundation’s Dr. Clarence and Rita Marchant Fund, the Ivy Tech Foundation and the Salvation Army.

“You are critical components of our network for improvement, our network for change,” said Bet Savich, director of the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network. “You are its fuel. Community development doesn’t happen without community service. And I just want to say, it’s an honor to work alongside you.”

Be More Bloomington Awards

Two Be More Bloomington Awards — selected from all the submitted nominations using the criteria of overall excellence, level of community impact and embodiment of community goodwill — were presented, one to Phillip Saunders and one to Julie Pointer.

Saunders has been volunteering for the Shalom Community Center since the daytime shelter’s inception in 1999. He led the Shalom Team at the First United Methodist Church, where the shelter was housed for its first decade. He has served on the board and the finance and development committee, and designed the center’s donor database. He volunteers almost every day — picking up the mail, preparing donation deposits, entering data and printing and mailing thank you letters.

Pointer’s volunteer leadership with the Monroe County Girl Scouts for 19 years has helped the organization to flourish, allowing more girls to discover new opportunities, connect with new friends, and make a difference in the world around them. She currently serves as the service unit manager for the southeastern half of Monroe County, serving more than 500 girls and supervising 281 adult volunteers. She also chairs the Monroe County Cookie Sale Team and is in her ninth year as director of the Girl Scout Day Camp.

Other award winners

The Be More Collaborative Award (family or group) went to the tornado cleanup volunteers of Van Buren Township. In the weeks following the F1 tornado that hit Bloomington on May 26, 2011, local volunteers gathered with their chain saws, heavy equipment and strong backs to clean up tons of tree, building and other debris scattered across the southwestern portion of Monroe County. The funds will go to the Van Buren Township Volunteer Firefighters.

The Be More Phenomenal Award (board member) went to Donna Lafferty for her work with the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra for an average of 100 hours per month over a period of 14 years. She has served as personnel manager, head of the nominations committee, and director of marketing and development. In 2011 alone, the committee raised roughly $38,000 for the orchestra, which relies heavily on volunteers for day-to-day operational support.

The Be More Involved Award (college student) went to Emily Bornstein for her volunteer work at Middle Way House. She designed an art program and curriculum for children ages 2 to 17, recruited other art students to help her, secured funding for supplies, and planned art activities each week, involving more than 60 children. She is working to ensure the program becomes a permanent collaboration between Middle Way House and the Hope School of Fine Arts at IU.

The Be More Creative Award (arts and culture) went to Mary Lee Deckard, one of the founders of the Monroe County History Center in 1980 after a group of volunteers saved the old Carnegie library building from being torn down. Since then, she has been a driving force on the collections and exhibits committee and the garage sale committee, helping at special events and single-handedly managing the Museum Gift Store.

The Be More Knowledgeable Award (education/literacy) went to Katie Hopkins for her involvement with the Monroe County Circles Initiative as a circle leader — someone who does not have enough resources to be stable, but is highly motivated to become self-sufficient. Hopkins helped create a video explaining Circles in Spanish and shared her story at trainings all over Indiana and the U.S.

The Be More Sustainable Award (environmental/animal welfare) went to Lisa Ritchel for her work at Bloomington Animal Care and Control. She serves as an adoption counselor and is responsible for registering all of the adopted animals’ microchips with their new owners’ information. She also spends hours each week comparing lost reports with animals in the shelter, calling potential matches, and reuniting lost cats and dogs with their owners.

The Be More Energized (youth) award went to Hannah Fidler, 16, who was one of the first and the youngest Bloomington volunteers to help open the 100 percent fair trade store Global Gifts in 2009 and has volunteered weekly ever since. She joined the board of directors in 2010 and quickly formed and led the educational outreach committee. She has since developed three fair trade curriculum modules for K-12 students and recently tested these modules at Harmony School during Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The funds will go to Fair Trade Bloomington.


Lee Marchant. Dann Denney | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012