New Tech Graduates Enroll at Ivy Tech

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 30, 2012

New Tech Graduates Enroll at Ivy Tech
More than half of New Tech High School seniors intend to enroll at Ivy Tech

Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s four year collaboration with New Tech High School has resulted in more than half of New Tech’s first graduating class to express intent to enroll at Ivy Tech. Ivy Tech offers “dual credit” classes on New Tech’s campus, which allow high school students to earn both high school and college credits. Additionally, New Tech students are offered the chance to take two dual credit classes at Ivy Tech’s campus tuition-free.

“Ivy Tech-Bloomington was the first Ivy Tech region to offer New Tech students two free dual credit classes,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart, who serves on the New Tech board of advisors. “This practice is now standard college policy at all Ivy Tech campuses statewide. Additionally, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has extended the offer of two free dual credit classes to students at Bloomington Graduation School, Harmony School, Lighthouse Christian Academy and Tabernacle Christian Academy in Martinsville.”

Dual credit classes offered at New Tech High School are New Student Seminar (IVYT 120) and Fundamentals of Imaging (VISC 102). A couple of years ago, an art class taught by Ivy Tech instructor Amy Brier was also offered at New Tech’s campus.

New Student Seminar enhances success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills necessary to their educational, career, and life objectives. Students create and apply critical thinking strategies in areas of time management, media literacy, learning styles, study skills, career planning, money management, and resource utilization.

Fundamentals of Imaging introduces students to a full range of image input technology and manipulation including conventional photography, digital imaging, and computer scanners. Students learn to communicate concepts and ideas through various imaging devices.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington course registration for fall 2012 is open, and classes begin on August 20. “Ivy Tech 101 Night,” an information session for prospective students, will be held on Thursday, June 21 at 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. in Lamkin Hall at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, 200 Daniels Way. To attend, contact Alexa Lopez, Assistant Director of Admissions at alopez69@ivytech.edu or (812) 330-6385.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Faculty Promoted to Highest Levels

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 29, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Faculty Promoted to Highest Levels

Ivy Tech-Bloomington has promoted School of Liberal Arts and Sciences faculty members Martin Wolfger and Christine Brandel to Ivy Tech’s highest faculty classification levels. Wolfger, Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Associate Professor in Psychology, was promoted to Professor of Psychology. Brandel, Assistant Professor of English, was promoted to Associate Professor of English.

“Both promotions are evidence of Wolfger’s and Brandel’s commitment to the success of individual students,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “Both of their promotions required a peer-review process. Promotions were awarded based upon service to the college outside teaching and administrative assignments, evidence of professional and community service, evidence of contributions at the statewide level, and scholarly activities. Wolfger’s promotion to Professor also included a review by two Vice Chancellors of Academic Affairs from Ivy Tech campuses outside of Bloomington.”

Wolfger started teaching at Ivy Tech in 2004 as adjunct faculty for Psychology. He was named program chair of the Psychology department in 2005. In 2009, Wolfger became chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences and in 2010 became Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. He is a licensed mental health counselor and holds a Master of Science in Psychology from Karl-Franzens University in Austria where he graduated with distinction. Wolfger also holds a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology from Ball State University where he received the Dean’s Citation for Academic Excellence for achieving a 4.0 GPA.

At Ivy Tech-Bloomington Wolfger serves on numerous committees for advancing education and for ensuring student success, including the Internationalization Collaborative Across Bloomington, a cooperative of Indiana University and Ivy Tech Bloomington and Achieving the Dream, a national initiative of Lumina Foundation. He served as chair of the statewide Ivy Tech Social and Behavioral Sciences Curriculum Development committee where he took a leadership role in discussions related to Ivy Tech’s Liberal Arts and Sciences degree in Psychology. In 2011, Ivy Tech-Bloomington selected Wolfger for the 2010 Ivy Tech President’s Award.

Brandel began teaching at Ivy Tech in 2008 and became full time faculty in the English Department the following year. She holds a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Bowling Green State University and successfully completed the Graduate Teacher Programme at the University of Derby in England.  She writes on higher education for The Huffington Post and is a columnist for Pop Matters, an international magazine of cultural criticism. Her poetry and fiction have appeared in literary journals throughout the U.S. and U.K.

At Ivy Tech-Bloomington, Brandel serves on the Global Studies Committee and has developed an internationalization curriculum faculty resource. She is a Fellow of the Internationalization Collaborative Across Bloomington and presented on globalization at community colleges, with Dean Wolfger, at the national Innovations 2012 conference in Philadelphia. Brandel is a member of the English Advisory Board, co-advises the Creative Writing Club, and supports the campus literary magazine. This April, one of her poems was featured in the National Council of Teachers of English 2012 National Poetry Month Celebration. Brandel was a finalist for the 2010 Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s President’s Award.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

 

 

 

Business management, on to Step II

Herald-Times

It’s Your Business

Business management, on to Step II

By Steve Bryant
A Bloomington voice
May 25, 2012

Small businesses that are growing often look to other business owners for advice on how to deal with problems. Companies at this growth stage are no longer as concerned about getting their first customer or keeping the lights on, but are more interested in company strategy, culture, hiring employees, benefits, raising money and purchasing or building a facility. These “second stage” companies need help from experienced leaders to succeed.

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington and the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship have recently licensed and implemented a peer learning program called the PeerSpectives Roundtable System from the Edward Lowe Foundation (http://edwardlowe.org/tools-programs/roundtables). It was designed for leaders of companies who cannot go to their spouses, employees or business partners for advice on handling tough issues as their business grows and challenges pile up. Leaders engage in a facilitated roundtable discussion once a month to learn from each other, share experiences and hold each other accountable to actions needed to grow their business.

We have two such CEO Roundtables operating here in Bloomington with members from Monroe County and our surrounding counties participating each month.

It has been a valuable program for the participants, and these sessions lead to simple and practical solutions that are exactly what the participants have been looking for as well as unabashed feedback that the business owners often need to hear. Often the participants think they are the only ones in the world dealing with these kinds of issues and pressures, while it quickly becomes clear that it is what most all business leaders face as their business grows.

If your business is interested in participating in the program, please feel free to contact us at 330-6261 or www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/entrepreneurship.

Steve Bryant is director of the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship. Next week’s column will be from Danise Alano-Martin with the city of Bloomington.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

 

 

Ivy Tech Offers Information Session June 14 to help Veterans Claim VRAP Benefits

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 25, 2012

Ivy Tech Offers Information Session June 14 to help Veterans Claim VRAP Benefits

Ivy Tech-Bloomington is offering an information session on June 14, 2012 from 11am-1pm in Room B123, to help veterans claim benefits from the Veterans Retraining Assistance Program (VRAP). The VRAP program is part of the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011. VRAP offers up to 12 months of training assistance to unemployed veterans between the ages of 35-60. Eligible veterans are encouraged to visit Ivy Tech on June 14 to receive information on the eligibility requirements of the VRAP program, talk with an academic advisor about the type of degree and career they want to pursue, and receive assistance applying for VRAP benefits.

“The VRAP program is exciting for unemployed veterans because it is an opportunity to train for a new career,” said Kim Bloodgood, Veteran Services Coordinator at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, who is also an Air Force veteran. “After learning about this program we were able to identify at least three possible recipients who are current Ivy Tech students. My hope is that veterans within the Bloomington community and surrounding counties also take advantage of this program.”

With the large number of military veteran students at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, Kim Bloodgood serves as campus liaison for this growing population. Kim serves approximately 300 students at Ivy Tech-Bloomington who receive benefits from the G.I. bill. “I am here for all veteran students regardless of the kinds of questions they might ask,” said Kim.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus was named a military-friendly school in Sept. 2011 by G.I. Jobs, a premier magazine for military personnel transitioning into civilian life.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Disney Institute Coming to Bloomington

Disney Institute Coming to Bloomington

InsideINdianaBusiness.com Report

May 21, 2012

The Disney Institute’s professional development program is scheduled to come to Bloomington next month. The event is being sponsored by Ivy Tech Corporate College.

News Release

Bloomington, Ind. – Disney Institute is bringing its renowned professional development program, Disney’s Approach to Leadership Excellence, to Ivy Tech Community College – Bloomington on June 13. Sponsored by Ivy Tech Corporate College, the full-day event will allow area professionals to learn how a leader’s behaviors are instrumental in conveying values, guiding strategy and inspiring passion and interest among employees.

“This is a great opportunity for area business professionals to participate in a Disney Institute experience in Bloomington,” said Jeff James, vice president for Disney Institute. “It’s a day of Disney training that will offer dozens of easy-to-implement, proven ideas that can help transform an organization. The program is as appropriate for project managers and intact work teams as it is for leaders and senior executives.”

Disney’s Approach to Leadership Excellence gives participants the chance to explore proven Disney leadership philosophies that encourage values that produce results and are fundamental for organizations to grow and succeed.

“In an era where everyone is competing for business and market share, strong leadership is essential for any organization to thrive,” James said. “This program is made for businesses in any industry looking to build a passionate workforce dedicated to delivering products and services that exceed customer expectations.”

“The Disney Institute training is applicable to any industry. More than ever, strong leadership training is necessary to succeed no matter what industry or area of business you specialize in,” said Dennis Maloy, Executive Director of Ivy Tech Corporate College-Bloomington. “The Disney Institute is not just corporate training; it can be especially valuable to entrepreneurs and individuals looking to gain leadership skills necessary to expand their businesses or rise to a position of leadership in their organizations. The Disney Institute is the perfect opportunity to learn from some of the strongest leaders in business.”

Program registration is $399 per person and includes all course materials. Corporate groups of five or more may register for $339 per person. Six CEU credits are available from the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy and the American College of Healthcare Executives. For more information or to register, visit www.ivytech.edu/disneyinstitute or call Ivy Tech Corporate College at (812) 330-6004.

About Ivy Tech Corporate College

Ivy Tech Corporate College was launched in fall 2011 to provide expanded business solutions for companies looking to provide training for their employees. Corporate College at Ivy Tech is focused on developing, introducing and delivering training, certifications, and skills-improvement courses that business leaders have survey-highlighted as essential to their sustainability and profitability. For the past 30 years, the College provided training services to local employers through its previously-known office of Workforce and Economic Development, and its predecessor Business and Industry Training.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

About Disney Institute

Disney Institute is the global professional training arm of The Walt Disney Company. One of the most recognized names in professional development, Disney Institute travels the world offering engaging seminars, workshops and presentations, as well as fully customized programming. Immersive learning experiences are also offered at Disney destinations in the United States, Europe and Asia, enabling participants to go behind the scenes and see firsthand how business theory drives operational excellence. The Disney Institute client roster includes Fortune 500 companies as well as a wide range of small businesses, non-profits and government agencies. To learn more, please visit www.disneyinstitute.com, www.facebook.com/disneyinstitute, www.twitter.com/disneyinstitute, or call 321-939-4600.

Source: Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech launches Ivy Biz for Kids for Teen Entrepreneurs

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 22, 2012

Ivy Tech launches Ivy Biz for Kids for Teen Entrepreneurs
Young entrepreneurs can learn business skills through jewelry design camp or music recording camp

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College – Bloomington is holding one-week summer camps to help young entrepreneurs translate their business ideas from concepts to reality through project-based activities. Space is still available in two camps: a jewelry design camp called “SUCCESSorize” for students in grades 6-8, and a music recording camp called “Entrepalooza!” for students in grades 9-11.

The “SUCCESSorize!” jewelry design camp runs June 11-15. Teens in grades 6-8 will learn how to design and produce their original jewelry designs. Using CAD 3-D modeling software, students will translate their designs to working prototypes and create a business plan to market and sell what they have produced. Fee of $75 includes all class materials and mid-morning snack. Fee of $165 includes an optional, full-day camp experience in partnership with City of Bloomington’s Kid City summer camp. The full-day camp includes programming at Ivy Tech and Kid City, transportation in-between, and both morning and afternoon snacks. Students who attend the entire day should bring a sack lunch. Camper pickup at Kid City is from 4 to 5:30 PM.

The “Entrepalooza!” music recording camp runs June 18-22. Teens in grades 9-11 will learn from an industry pro what it takes to record music in a professional studio. Students will learn about recording, album cover design, proper microphone placement, analog/digital conversion, multi-track mixdown, and final recording. $125 course fee includes all materials and mid-morning snack. Class meets at Renegade Studio at 6511 E. SR 46 in Bloomington (Kid City afternoon session not available).

“Hosting these summer camps for youth fulfills part of the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship’s mission to engage the community and foster entrepreneurship in the Bloomington area,” said Steve Bryant, Executive Director of the Cook Center. “Our summer camp programming also includes collaboration with local businesses, so students can learn first-hand from local entrepreneurs. Last year with support from Monroe County Government, the Cook Center launched the jewelry design camp, and students were able to learn from Gold Casters Fine Jewelry. This year, our music recording camp will be held in partnership with local recording business, Renegade Studio.”

Class spaces are still available. For more information, contact Noel Niehaus at nniehaus@ivytech.edu, or (812) 330-6261. To register, contact Kariana Wolfe at kwolfe1@ivytech.edu, or (812 ) 330-6041. A registration form is also located online at: www.ivytech.edu/cll/youth/.

About The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was established in 2010 to develop and implement practical tools and resources for students, individuals, and the community to foster entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Bloomington and in the broader economic development region it serves.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech Community College welcomes Disney Institute to Bloomington

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 21, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College welcomes Disney Institute to Bloomington
Full-day program explores secrets to leadership excellence

Disney Institute is bringing its renowned professional development program, Disney’s Approach to Leadership Excellence, to Ivy Tech Community College – Bloomington on June 13.  Sponsored by Ivy Tech Corporate College, the full-day event will allow area professionals to learn how a leader’s behaviors are instrumental in conveying values, guiding strategy and inspiring passion and interest among employees.

“This is a great opportunity for area business professionals to participate in a Disney Institute experience in Bloomington,” said Jeff James, vice president for Disney Institute.  “It’s a day of Disney training that will offer dozens of easy-to-implement, proven ideas that can help transform an organization.  The program is as appropriate for project managers and intact work teams as it is for leaders and senior executives.”

Disney’s Approach to Leadership Excellence gives participants the chance to explore proven Disney leadership philosophies that encourage values that produce results and are fundamental for organizations to grow and succeed.

“In an era where everyone is competing for business and market share, strong leadership is essential for any organization to thrive,” James said.  “This program is made for businesses in any industry looking to build a passionate workforce dedicated to delivering products and services that exceed customer expectations.”

“The Disney Institute training is applicable to any industry. More than ever, strong leadership training is necessary to succeed no matter what industry or area of business you specialize in,” said Dennis Maloy, Executive Director of Ivy Tech Corporate College-Bloomington. “The Disney Institute is not just corporate training; it can be especially valuable to entrepreneurs and individuals looking to gain leadership skills necessary to expand their businesses or rise to a position of leadership in their organizations. The Disney Institute is the perfect opportunity to learn from some of the strongest leaders in business.”

Program registration is $399 per person and includes all course materials. Corporate groups of five or more may register for $339 per person. Six CEU credits are available from the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy and the American College of Healthcare Executives.  For more information or to register, visit www.ivytech.edu/disneyinstitute or call Ivy Tech Corporate College at (812) 330-6004.

About Ivy Tech Corporate College
Ivy Tech Corporate College was launched in fall 2011 to provide expanded business solutions for companies looking to provide training for their employees. Corporate College at Ivy Tech is focused on developing, introducing and delivering training, certifications, and skills-improvement courses that business leaders have survey-highlighted as essential to their sustainability and profitability. For the past 30 years, the College provided training services to local employers through its previously-known office of Workforce and Economic Development, and its predecessor Business and Industry Training.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

About Disney Institute
Disney Institute is the global professional training arm of The Walt Disney Company. One of the most recognized names in professional development, Disney Institute travels the world offering engaging seminars, workshops and presentations, as well as fully customized programming. Immersive learning experiences are also offered at Disney destinations in the United States, Europe and Asia, enabling participants to go behind the scenes and see firsthand how business theory drives operational excellence. The Disney Institute client roster includes Fortune 500 companies as well as a wide range of small businesses, non-profits and government agencies. To learn more, please visit www.disneyinstitute.com, www.facebook.com/disneyinstitute, www.twitter.com/disneyinstitute, or call 321-939-4600.

Brain tumor survivor and artist, John D. Shearer, to exhibit at Ivy Tech Waldron in June

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 14, 2012

Brain tumor survivor and artist, John D. Shearer, to exhibit at Ivy Tech Waldron in June

John D. Shearer, photographer and artist, will display his multi-media exhibit “I’m Too Young For This @#!%” during the month of June at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center. The opening reception is Friday, June 1 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and is free and open to the public.

“John’s defiant optimism shines in every frame, and his audio and video are an unusually powerful mix of journalism and artistic expression,” said Julie Roberts, gallery director at the Ivy Tech Waldron. “His still portraits are especially beautiful.”

Shearer was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor at age 28, and two days later, had surgery that left him blind and paralyzed on the left side of his body. He took one semester off from his graduate studies while recovering, and returned during rehabilitation and treatment to complete his Master of Fine Arts degree in photography at Indiana State University.

“The work I created during treatment is probably the most honest that I have ever made – it feels good to be open about the experience,” he said. “This work helps me to remember where I was, and how far I’ve come since it all began.”

Shearer turned his clinical experiences and brain scans into art. “I’m Too Young For This @#!%” includes photography, mixed media, an audio project that chronicles a year’s worth of voicemails, and a video.

“I hope it will serve as an example for other young adult survivors of what is possible – that life after cancer can still be good,” he said. “In fact, it can be more meaningful than ever.”

He and his fiancée, Amanda Billings, are expecting their first child, a son, in late-May.

Shearer is adjunct faculty at Ivy Tech Community College, where he was also a student before earning his Bachelor’s degree. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in photojournalism and telecommunications from Ball State University in 2003, and completed his Master of Fine Arts degree in photography at ISU in 2011. His rock and commercial photographs have been published in numerous regional and national publications, including Business Week, Paste Magazine, Rolling Stone, Spin, and Teen People among others. Some of his commercial clients include Best Western and Clear Channel Entertainment.

For more information about the exhibit and June opening reception, contact Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center at 330-4400 or log on www.ivytech.edu/waldron.

The exhibit is also listed at the Brain Extravaganza! website under upcoming events at www.jbtbrains.org.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Opening Reception

Friday, June 1 from 5-8 pm

John D. Shearer:  I’m Too Young For This @#!%

Photographer and artist John D. Shearer had it all—his rock photos published in Rolling Stone, the love of his life ready to marry him—when a brain tumor left him legally blind and paralyzed.  Undaunted, Shearer turned his eye inward, creating powerful art about his cancer.  From brain scans to video to a year’s worth of voicemails, Shearer transformed cancer’s raw materials into a multi-media exhibit that earned him an MFA while he was still undergoing treatment and rehabilitation.

Ivy Tech Commencement: Graduates told to share their stories of hope and inspiration

Ivy Tech Commencement: Graduates told to share their stories of hope and inspiration

By Rod Spaw 331-4338 | rspaw@heraldt.com
May 12, 2012

PHOTO GALLERY: Ivy Tech Commencement

Every Ivy Tech graduation is a celebration of more than just the conferring of degrees. For many of the more than 670 Ivy Tech-Bloomington students Friday at the Indiana University Auditorium, the degrees or certificates they received represented a second chance, a better life for their families or the culmination of a dream achieved through hard work and determination.

There were people like Stephanie Deckard, who started her college career three years ago just before her 40th birthday, a first-generation college student who enrolled to set a positive example for her children. She graduated Friday with an associate of applied science degree in hospitality administration.

There were people like Rachael Rosso, who completed two degrees in less than three years and would not be thrown off track even after sustaining severe injuries in a motor vehicle accident last January. With the support of her family and friends, as well as the staff and faculty at Ivy Tech, she completed her studies in time to graduate Friday with an associate of arts degree in general studies and an associate of science degree, liberal arts, with a chemistry concentration.

There were people like Jeffrey Fields, who lost a job that paid well when Visteon closed its doors in Bedford in 2008. Out of work for the first time in 22 years, Fields decided his best option was to pursue his interest in computers at Ivy Tech. He was named Information Technology’s outstanding student and graduated Friday with an associate of applied science degree in computer information technology.

Graduation speaker Gerardo M. Gonzalez, dean of the IU School of Education, could relate to all their stories. Gonzalez came to Florida with his parents from Cuba in the early 1960s. He found himself immersed in an educational system that didn’t understand children from other cultures and wasn’t prepared to educate students who couldn’t even speak English when they arrived at school.

Like other students who were different, he said in his commencement address, he eventually became “invisible” to the system and left high school with no skills by which to obtain meaningful employment. He said it was only after enrolling at Miami-Dade Community College that he found the path that brought him to leadership of one of the premier schools of education in the country.

“I don’t say this to brag about my accomplishments; rather, I want you to understand that the fact I had been tracked into vocational education in high school had nothing to do with my actual academic ability,” he told the Ivy Tech graduates and guests. “Once offered a chance at education with dignity and respect, I excelled.”

Friday was the second time Gonzalez had addressed a graduating class of the local Ivy Tech campus. The first time was 2007, and Gonzalez noted that while much has changed in the world — economic recession and the death of Osama bin Laden — education still is the great equalizer, the cure for the hopelessness that drives the forces of terrorism around the world.

For that reason, Gonzalez said, he supports a federal DREAM Act to give undocumented immigrant children a path to citizenship by attending college or joining the military.

“For every child like me, and like many of you here tonight, who gets a second chance to succeed, there are literally millions who don’t get that second chance,” he said. “Freedom depends on having a fair and just society where everyone is afforded a meaningful opportunity to pursue his or her dreams.”

Gonzalez told the graduates to remember their roots as their lives go forward and to “inspire and help others reach their full potential.”

Thomas Snyder, president of Ivy Tech Community College, also reminded the 2012 graduates about their responsibilities.

“The most important thing we do is send you out with your stories and your skills,” Snyder said. “You’re not only changing your life. You’re changing Indiana, and you’re changing the lives of people around you.”


Nursing school graduate Alissa Shiffrin, center, waits in line with her fellow graduates outside the IU Auditorium. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times
The Indiana University Auditorium is filled Friday evening with friends and family of Ivy Tech graduates. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times
Heidi Wampler, Ivy Tech assistant director of academic affairs, right, looks at graduate Rachael Rosso’s cap, which was decorated. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Gerardo Gonzalez, dean of the Indiana University School of Education, delivers the commencement address to Ivy Tech graduates. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Ivy Tech awards

Each commencement ceremony, Ivy Tech-Bloomington recognizes students for outstanding academic achievements. Academic program chairs in 25 programs of study choose students to receive the award.

This year’s recipients are Tom Powell, accounting; Erin Couch, biotechnology; Andriya Nichole Hardy, business administration; Re’Nardo Ellay Williams, computer information systems; Jeffrey Fields, computer information technology; Joni M. Bennett, office administration; Mary Margaret Houston Demes, early childhood education; Carrie Robbins, education; and Brandon Paul McGuire, general studies; Jessica Lynn Kirkman, Liberal Arts; Mary Katherine Miller, health care support; Clara Kallner, health information technology; Diana Soots, paramedic science; Jocelyn Bower, radiation therapy; J. Michael Wathen, respiratory care; Tony Mosora, practical nursing; Melissa Messmer and Sarah Stewart, nursing; Andrew Michael Bradley Dwyer, criminal justice; Emily Melton, hospitality administration; James Alexander Maniakas, paralegal studies; Kenneth Hinkle, public safety; Edwin John Lewis, design technology; Vincent Edwards Summer, electronics and computer technology; Paul Hudson, heating, ventilation and air conditioning; and Justin C. Luthe, industrial technology.

Almost 700 to graduate from Ivy Tech Friday night

Herald-Times

Almost 700 to graduate from Ivy Tech Friday night

By April Toler
331-4353 | atoler@heraldt.com

May 11, 2012, last update: 5/10 @ 10:56 pm

Close to 700 graduates, including international students, transfer students, military veterans and even a mother and a son, will be honored Friday evening during Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s commencement ceremony.

The ceremony takes place at 6 p.m. at the Indiana University Auditorium.

Among the graduates will be Rosalie Wilkerson, who at age 65 will receive a technical certificate in business administration.

Wilkerson always loved computers and learning, according to information from Ivy Tech, and said that although she was nervous about attending college, she has learned a lot from her younger classmates.

“One of the best things about going back to school was being able to be around my younger classmates,” Wilkerson said in a written statement. “I have learned so much about the younger generation and how smart they are.”

Gerardo Gonzalez, dean of IU’s School of Education, will give the commencement address.

“Dr. Gonzalez is a Miami-Dade Community College graduate, a Cuban immigrant, and a model of persistence and success for all community college students,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart in a written statement.

Almost 673 will graduate with either an associate degree, technical certificate or other certificate.

Of those, 191 are graduating with honors, and 25 are earning summa cum laude honors for maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade point average.

Two international students, one from South Korea and one from the Dominican Republic, will be among the graduates.

The college will also hand out degrees to 38 veterans and three students with Trade Adjustment Assistance. Also, 74 associate of science in nursing degrees will be awarded.

Additionally, 64 graduates are members of Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society.

There are many stories of triumph and perseverance, Whikehart said, with each of Ivy Tech’s graduates.

Hearing those stories during each commencement ceremony, he said, makes the night extra special.

“I have the best seat in the house because I can see not only the graduates, but also the families,” Whikehart said. “The looks on their faces is so great to watch … to see how proud they are of what these people are doing.”


Ivy Tech awards

Each commencement ceremony, Ivy Tech-Bloomington recognizes students for outstanding academic achievements.

Academic program chairs in 25 programs of study, choose students to receive the award.

This year’s recipients are Tom Powell, accounting; Erin Couch, biotechnology; Andriya Nichole Hardy, business administration; Re’Nardo Ellay Williams, computer information systems; Jeffrey Fields, computer information technology; Joni M. Bennett, office administration; Mary Margaret Houston Demes, early childhood education; Carrie Robbins, education; and Brandon Paul McGuire, general studies; Jessica Lynn Kirkman, Liberal Arts; Mary Katherine Miller, health care support; Clara Kallner, health information technology; Diana Soots, paramedic science; Jocelyn Bower, radiation therapy; J. Michael Wathen, respiratory care; Tony Mosora, practical nursing; Melissa Messmer and Sarah Stewart, nursing; Andrew Michael Bradley Dwyer, criminal justice; Emily Melton, hospitality administration; James Alexander Maniakas, paralegal studies; Kenneth Hinkle, public safety; Edwin John Lewis, design technology; Vincent Edwards Summer, electronics and computer technology; Paul Hudson, heating, ventilation and air conditioning; and Justin C. Luthe, industrial technology.

Ivy Tech graduates signify what community college is meant to do

Herald-Times
OUR OPINION

Ivy Tech graduates signify what community college is meant to do

May 10, 2012, last update: 5/10 @ 6:59 am

Ivy Tech’s success is apparent in the stories of some of this year’s graduating class, 673 students who will receive their associate degrees or certificates of completion Friday at the Indiana University Auditorium.

The community college has grown over the past decade from its cramped barracks-like former home on the northwest side to its large, modern and impressive campus on the far west side. Its students already have filled that campus and spilled over into temporary quarters wherever they can be found, with current enrollment at close to 9,000, about a third higher than just six years ago.

They are what the community college concept is designed for, a hugely diverse mix of traditional and nontraditional students with goals ranging from job-specific technical skills certificates to completion of the first two years of a university degree, with perhaps graduate school to follow.

That was the path of Friday’s commencement speaker — Gerardo Gonzalez, dean of the IU School of Education, whose first degree came from Miami-Dade Community College in Florida.

The students to be honored as outstanding students at Friday’s graduation are a good sample of Ivy Tech’s reach.

There is Stefany Terrell, a 21-year-old traditional student (nontraditional students are defined as older than 25) who chose to do her first two years of college at Ivy Tech because she’s paying for her own education. Ivy Tech is significantly less expensive than Indiana University, where she plans on finishing her degree at the Kelley School of Business.

Former GI Kelsey Kirk will pick up his associate of science degree in respiratory care, magna cum laude. “By going to Ivy Tech I have become a better person from all the knowledge and experiences I have gained and from all the people (fellow students, professors, teachers, advisors and counselors) that have touched my life along the way,” he wrote.

Then, there’s another veteran, Rachael Rosso, who’s married with a couple of kids, a handful for any full-time student. She also had to overcome serious injuries and spinal surgery, the result of a traffic accident in January. She still made it through on schedule.

Visteon’s closing of its Bedford plant in 2008 threw Jeffery Fields out of a well paid job he had expected to retire from. Friday, he will pick up his associate’s degree in computer information technology and says his success will be complete when he lands a job in his new field.

There are more, of course. One, Stephanie Deckard, was almost 40 when she started at Ivy Tech. Friday, she will receive her associate’s degree in hospitality administration. “If I could encourage a future student, I would tell them to hold on and expect the most unexpected ride of your life!” she wrote. “You’ll learn more about yourself than any subject could teach you — that’s the best learning experience of all.”

Ivy Tech offers the vehicle for that ride — all you have to do is hop on.

 

Ivy Tech displays four new exhibits at Waldron Center

Four artists showcase work this month at Ivy Tech Arts Center

Ivy Tech displays four new exhibits at Waldron Center

By Jaclyn Lansbery | Indiana Daily Student (IDS)

On Friday at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, more than 200 people gathered to view four artists’ new exhibits on display until May 27.

The May First Friday artists’ reception debuted the work of Nate Johnson, Ben Pines, Yang Chen and Angela Hendrix-Petry. The artists, who attended the reception, each create different styles of art.

“I think Julie Roberts, the gallery director, did an exquisite job arranging the artists’ work,” said Paul Daily, the artistic director for the center. “We’re always pleased to have the opportunity to showcase more local artists in our galleries.”

Chen’s exhibit “Les Preludes” is displayed in the Treasurer’s Gallery and consists of up-close photographs of nature details, such as dead dandelions or blooming flowers.

The photographs were mounted on a 17-by-42-inch scroll. Chen, who received his masters of fine arts in photography from IU, also designs digital and book art.

“From my impression, and I’m certainly not speaking for the artists and what they intend, but there is almost an Asian feel for the tapestries and the artwork in the pictures and where they look at life,” Daily said.

Pines, a local artist, created 13 paintings for his “Recent Works” exhibit, which are all united by dark blue overtones of people interacting with each other. The people’s features are also undefined.

“The way the working world is so fast-paced, it’s sort of a main function of the art that I want to make, to provide an alternative to that,” said Pines, who worked on the paintings in this exhibit since 2010.

“I need, and I think people need, to be free of constant rush, to accomplish sort of external tasks in order to work within, to think about oneself and to think about the world in a free, meditative way.”

The biggest painting in Pines’ exhibit is “Cookout at Lake Monroe,” which features people conversing at the local lake front.

“I like to take my time when I work, I think it’s very important for me to keep a calm level head as I work,” he said.

Pines said he tries to establish and develop a particular mood during the painting process, and that if the mood doesn’t feel “right” two weeks before the show, the piece will not be completed.

“I was happy with how the show came out, and I’m happy with how the paintings came out individually,” he said.

In the second floor of the Arts Center is Johnson’s exhibit, “Heroes and Icons.” Four of those paintings are private collections of his family and self-portraits. The rest of the paintings, which are for sale, are of famous icons. Johnson used stencils and spray paint to create these pieces.

The fourth exhibit for May is Angela Hendrix-Petry’s photography exhibit called “Journeys with a Simple Girl.” This is a collection of 35 photos, 11 of which are black and white, of nature and Hendrix-Petry’s children, which she said are her muses.

She began shooting pictures three years ago when she, her husband and four children moved from a house in the backwoods of Brown County and into a Bloomington suburban neighborhood.

The year they moved, her husband bought her a camera.

“I used the camera as a tool to help me find what the beauty is in the everyday,” said Hendrix-Petry, whose photographs have been hung at the east- and west-side Bloomingfoods locations and at Thrive Healing Arts, a Bloomington gallery that also offers massage therapy.

Hendrix-Petry said she doesn’t use Photoshop or any other editing techniques to alter her photos.

“That is something that is a little unique in this day and age of digital photography because you can really jack up an image to a level where it almost gets distorted, and you’re kind of lost in it,” she said.

Daily said the Center holds artists’ receptions the first Friday of every month for new exhibits.

Ivy Tech Commencement next Friday

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 3, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington commencement ceremony to take place next Friday at IU Auditorium

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus commencement ceremony will take place at 6 p.m. on Friday, May 11 at the Indiana University Auditorium.

Approximately 673 students are completing their education by earning associate degrees, technical certificates, and certificates. The number of students graduating with honors is 191, with 25 students earning Summa Cum Laude honors for maintaining a perfect 4.0 grade point average.

The commencement address will be given by Dr. Gerardo Gonzalez, University Dean of Indiana University’s School of Education. Chancellor John Whikehart will present Dr. Gonzalez with an honorary Associate of Science degree for College and Community Service from Ivy Tech.

“Dr. Gonzalez is a Miami-Dade Community College graduate, a Cuban immigrant, and a model of persistence and success for all community college students,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart.” “He was instrumental in shepherding Ivy Tech’s system-wide education degree articulation with IU, has been an involved and visible community volunteer in Bloomington, and was appointed in 2012 by the Speaker of the Indiana House of Representatives, Brian C. Bosma, to the Indiana Commission for Hispanic/Latino Affairs.”

Some of the graduates who will be celebrated at the ceremony include international students, transfer students, military veterans, a mother and son, students seeking retraining, and those who have acquired employment because of their education and training at Ivy Tech.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is graduating two international students –from South Korea and from Dominican Republic.

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus will confer degrees to 38 veterans and 3 students with Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA). The TAA Act was implemented to assist trade-affected workers who have lost their jobs as a result of increased imports or shifts in production out of the United States.

Approximately 74 Associate of Science in nursing degrees will be awarded, and those nurses will be pinned during the ceremony.

There are 64 graduates who are members of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society. Phi Theta Kappa honor society recognizes and encourages scholarship through leadership and academic excellence among two-year college students.

Each commencement ceremony, Ivy Tech-Bloomington recognizes students for outstanding academic achievements. Academic program chairs in 25 programs of study choose students to receive this award. Outstanding Student award recipients include:

Accounting
Tom Powell

Biotechnology
Erin Couch

Business Administration
Andriya Nichole Hardy

Computer Information Systems
Re’Nardo Ellay Williams

Computer Information Technology
Jeffrey Fields

Office Administration
Joni M. Bennett

Early Childhood Education
Mary Margaret Houston Demes
Erica Lynn Fesler

Education
Carrie Robbins

General Studies
Brandon Paul McGuire

Liberal Arts
Jessica Lynn Kirkman

Health Care Support
Mary Katherine Miller

Health Information Technology
Clara Kallner

Paramedic Science
Diana Soots

Radiation Therapy
Jocelyn Bower

Respiratory Care
J. Michael Wathen

Practical Nursing
Tony Mosora

Nursing
Melissa Messmer
Sarah Stewart

Criminal Justice
Andrew Michael Bradley Dwyer

Hospitality Administration
Emily Melton

Paralegal Studies
James Alexander Maniakas

Public Safety
Kenneth Hinkle

Design Technology
Edwin John Lewis

Electronics & Computer Technology
Vincent Edwards Summer

Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
Paul Hudson

Industrial Technology
Justin C. Luthe

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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All media are invited and encouraged to attend commencement and interview students.

*Graduate success stories

Rosalie Wilkerson (65 Years Old)

Technical Certificate, Business Administration, Cum Laude

When I first mentioned going back to school to my son he said he thought that was great. That is when I first started seriously thinking about it. Some of my friends were not as supportive. Since I was 64 years old they did not see the point. I have 4 children and all of them graduated from college. I married right out of high school and started a family. At that time in my life that was what I wanted to do.

I always wondered what it was like to go to college. I love computers and learning. So many of my friends do not even own a computer or want to learn about them. The biggest obstacle I had to overcome was my own fear. I was an average student in High School and math was a problem for me. I did not take Algebra and I was afraid of the compass test. I did not do well on that part of the test so I took beginning Algebra and after just two weeks of the course I passed the compass test.

Learning how to study and do homework was hard in the beginning. I had been out of school for over 40 years. The best class that helped me adjust was IVY 120. I received the highest grade in the class. Last semester I made the Dean’s List, and I cannot describe how that accomplishment made me feel. I did not once do that in High School. I have had to make sure and devote myself to studying and getting homework done.

Learning how to use Excel, Word, Access and Power Point has helped me in my personal life as well. I have been trying to write a book on being an Identical Twin. The English classes I have taken has been invaluable to me, they were my favorite classes. Reading and literature have always been my strong points as my compass test proved.

One of the best things about going back to school was being able to be around my younger classmates. I have learned so much about the younger generation and how smart they are. Their technical abilities astound me. They are up to date on what is going on in the world, much more than I was at their age. They are also open-minded to change and want to help make the world a better place to live. There are so many issues facing them that my generation did not have.

I will receive my Technical Degree this summer in Business and HR at age 65. HR has always been of interest to me and I intend to pursue a degree in it. My family is very proud of what I have accomplished so far.

Re’Nardo Ellay Williams (Non-traditional student, transfer to IU [Kelley School of Business hopeful], honors grad, wife/2 kids)

Associate of Applied Science, Computer Information Systems, Summa Cum Laude, Outstanding Student award recipient

My decision to attend Ivy Tech was a process that started more than three years ago when I traveled to Indiana to spend my holiday season with my wife’s family. My new father-in-law showed me the Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington campus.

I continued my current job, as a creative director for a glamour fashion magazine later to realize the continued downfall of our economy. My wife and I just recently had our first son and I knew that a decision needed to be made about my career.  We decided to move from Tampa, Florida, so I could pursue an Associate Degree in Computer Information Systems at Ivy Tech Community College. The first person I met was an advisor, Elizabeth Lyon; she assisted in my academic planning and demonstrated complete support in me as a non-traditional student. I never forget her words “you are going to be a great success story, I look forward to you graduating”. The excitement to get my degree was like no other feeling I had felt in a very long time. Upon acceptance to Ivy Tech, I began to feel like a young college student, ready to conquer the world of higher education.

I was chosen to be on the Campus Activities Board (CAB) for the 2010-2011 academic year. Being a part of this student organization gave me the opportunity to meet and help other students. The huge success of CAB brought forth other opportunities to join other organizations like Student Government Association (SGA). At the end of the Spring 2011, I was elected as Student Body President 2011-2012.

I am proud to say that I have been selected to the ALL-STATE Academic Team and received scholarships from Bloomington Rotary Club, Old National Bank and Bloomington General. I will graduate from Ivy Tech Community College with an Associate of Applied Science in Computer Information Systems. My plans are to continue my education for a Bachelor’s at Indiana University, Kelley School of Business. I will be a full-time college student while also being a stay-at-home Dad. My family is very important in this process to accomplish my educational goals because without their support I would not be unable to complete.

The pursuit of a college education is a choice and not everyone commits to the challenge. Those who build life-long relationships by networking, getting involved in school organizations and pursue academic planning with your advisors will have the educational experience of a lifetime. When a person asks me about my college experience, I love to say from the bottom of my heart, Ivy Tech saved my life!

Adina K. Love (Worked at GE)

Associate of Science, Nursing, Cum Laude

I started going to Ivy Tech Community College in May of 2004 while still working at General Electric as an assembler.  I began taking classes because GE had already laid off several people, including my husband, in the previous years and I knew it would probably happen to me eventually.  I started off by taking English, Math, and many other prerequisite classes that I needed before I could actually pick what I wanted to do.

I didn’t know at first what I wanted to get a degree in but after becoming a volunteer with Hospice, I realized that I wanted to be a nurse.  I had always felt like something was missing in my life while I worked at GE but I assumed that I would be there until I retired.  I was laid off in September 2009 and I began getting help through the unemployment office such as unemployment wages and services to accommodate my schooling interests.  My tuition and books have all been paid for.

I was fortunate to be approved for the nursing degree through the state even though I wasn’t accepted in the Nursing program yet.  General Electric called me back to work in May 2010 and I declined – to move onto the career that I had always dreamed of.  Ivy Tech has been a great college because there is so much diversity with age groups and cultures.  I almost forget that I am going to college.

I ended up getting selected into the RN program and I am about to graduate this May.  I feel very blessed because I have made many lifetime friends and many memories.  I still have contact with several people that I met at Ivy Tech.  The RN program has been one of the hardest things that I have done in my life but it is also one of the best experiences and I wouldn’t change any of it.

When I walk across that stage at graduation, I will be thinking of my dad who passed away two months after I started at Ivy Tech.  He is a big reason why I enjoy taking care of people because he was always taking care of me and others.  I know God has blessed me and I can’t wait to be able to bless the people that I take care of.  I will enjoy having the chance at a career and I appreciate the Ivy Tech nursing instructors who have been so supportive and encouraging.

Kelsey Kirk (Military Veteran) MALE Student

Associate of Science, Respiratory Care, Magna Cum Laude

I graduated from high school in 1995.  After high school, I went to IU for a semester.  I ran out of money and didn’t have the guidance I needed on financial aid and loans, so I joined the workforce and barely scraped by.  I joined the Army after Sept. 11, 2001 and chose to be combat medic.  I deployed to Iraq for a year during Operation Iraqi Freedom.  In January of 2006, I was honorably discharged from the Army because my enlistment was over and I decided to join the civilian workforce again.  I found several good jobs. I managed a group home for the developmentally disabled, located underground utilities, and was a service representative for a home medical company. I was not happy and worked from sun up to way past sun down just to pick what bills to pay now and what would have to wait. Something had to give. I knew that I was eligible for the GI Bill, but didn’t know how to use it.

I chose to go to Ivy Tech because it was affordable and it had a Respiratory Care program.  I spoke with the Veteran’s advisor, Kim, who told me all about the Post 9/11 GI Bill; that would pay my tuition, provide me funds for books and give me a housing allowance.  This helped me to become a full time student and work part time so that I could reach my goal of becoming a Respiratory Therapist sooner.

I have been a student at Ivy Tech since the fall semester of 2009.  I will graduate on May 11, 2012 with an Associates of Science Degree in Respiratory Care. By going to Ivy Tech I have become a better person from all the knowledge and experiences I have gained and from all the people (fellow students, professors, teachers, advisors, and counselors) that have touched my life along the way.  I now have a student position at a local hospital and I am interviewing for positions at two other facilities for after I graduate.  The future sure looks bright.

Stephanie Deckard (Non-traditional student)
Associate of Applied Science, Hospitality Administration, Cum Laude

I started my college career 3 years ago just before my 40th birthday, as a first generation college student. My oldest son was graduating high school and I had always expected both of my sons to attend college. It wasn’t anything that was really talked about, it was just expected. When my oldest son began talking about not going to college, I felt it was unfair of me to put college expectations on him when I had never placed them upon myself.  After all, I work for the school system in special education and know how important and precious education is.  I just never thought of it as being something for me.

School had always been hard for me.  In high school, there was never a day that I didn’t struggle.  I began to think that maybe I could change that! To set a positive example for my children, I enrolled with my oldest son at Ivy Tech. I was really excited to find out that there was a culinary program on the Bloomington campus.  I couldn’t wait to get started o n my educational journey.

Working and going to school full time while taking care of my family has been the hardest thing I’ve ever done. In high school, I was a C average student no matter how hard I studied.  After starting at Ivy Tech I found enjoyment in learning and have been able to achieve honor roll status. It has been hard work and many long hours have been put in between my full time job and school, but it has been worth every second. I have gone from being a shy person with very low self-esteem to a strong, independent, confident person.  Chef Delay has helped me along the way by pushing me in a positive way.  There were times that I would get very frustrated with him, but I eventually began to realize that he was only pushing me to help me achieve the potential that he could already see in me. He has been a true mentor.

This past summer I became a first time grandmother and our family struggled as my grandson fought for his life at Riley Children’s Hospital. During this time, the thought of quitting school came very easily. My grandson is an amazing fighter and I wanted him, along with my family, to see me succeed. He’s almost a year old, is in perfect health and will be watching his Nana graduate from college. Something I feared would not happen.

The support of my family and friends has helped me to achieve my goals at Ivy Tech.  This experience has taught me to step out of my comfort zone and try new things. I am determined to succeed. If I could encourage a future student, I would tell them to hold on and expect the most unexpected ride of your life! You’ll learn more about yourself than any subject could teach you – that’s the best learning experience of all.

Jeffery Fields (Re-training due to Visteon Closure, Phi Theta Kappa member, Dean’s list, completing internship at Morgan County Hospital, American Red Cross Volunteer)

Associate of Applied Science, Computer Information Technology, Outstanding Student honors, Cum Laude

After working at a good paying, great benefits job, from which I fully expected to retire some day, suddenly I was out of work for the first time in over 22 years!  I worked at Visteon and they closed their doors in 2008.  I applied for unemployment benefits, of course. Then I started weighing my options.  Do I only search for new employment or do I take advantage of the opportunity to go back to school?  I had always been interested in computers and actually knew a lot about them.  I decided my best option was to go to Ivy Tech and learn even more about Information Technology, which I believe is a booming field.

I have enjoyed my time at Ivy Tech and have learned a lot, being on the Dean’s List each and every semester.  I will be graduating Cum Laude and belong to Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society.  I have also been honored to be named “Information Technology Outstanding Student,” and I am currently working an Internship at Morgan County Hospital in Martinsville.

I feel the Ivy Tech experience has been very rewarding, not only from the educational standpoint but also the friendships with students and teachers alike.  My success story will be complete when I obtain a job in Information Technology that is challenging and well paying.  If I am unable to secure such a position, I may return to school and change my focus to Information Security, which I believe is definitely an up and coming field.  I would highly recommend Ivy Tech to anyone looking to further their education, it is a life changing experience!

Rachael Rosso (Military Veteran, Transfer student to IUPUI for Chemistry, Faced head-on collision injuries and attended school while in rehabilitation, completed two degrees in 3 years)

Associate of Science, Liberal Arts – Chemistry Concentration

Associate of Arts, General Studies

I was hit head-on January 28, 2012. I was trapped in my vehicle and had to be cut out with use of the Jaws of Life. I sustained severe injuries. Due to the injuries I had to undergo cervical spinal fusion surgery. My life and that of my family was dramatically affected by this. I had to work even harder than usual to maintain my set goals. I was unable to work my security job during this time and had major challenges facing me in regards to completing my schooling this semester. I am married for ten years, and have two young children, a daughter age of seven, and a son age of eight. It was very difficult to be deprived of the ability to do normal everyday activities with my children and family. However, I was lucky to have an abundance of support from my family, friends, co-workers, and the faculty and staff members at Ivy Tech. Everyone supported me by either a word of encouragement to helping me by typing my papers as I recited them out loud. This was a very large load both physically and emotionally to bear alone, but I found that when I needed help everyone was there with their hearts and hands to lend whatever time or help needed to me.

I made the firm decision that I would not allow myself to be defeated by what had happened, and due to my choice I found that those around me were happy and exceptional at going the extra mile in supporting my decision with their willingness to help, and support me. I am currently in recovery and becoming stronger each and every day. I have gained an even greater sense of respect and appreciation for my family, friends, co-workers and all the great staff and faculty at Ivy Tech.

I was the Executive officer of the Student Veterans Organization for the 2011-2012 year. I have participated in the Memorial Day Poster contest and won, I have also done many volunteer things on campus through my time in the SVO with CAB and volunteered reading names of fallen soldiers on Veteran’s Day.

I have worked part-time throughout my entire time at Ivy Tech except for the few months this semester due to the accident injuries. I will have completed both degrees in less than 3 years.

Heather Gabbard (Non-traditional student)

Associate of Applied Science, Early Childhood Education

Heather chose to attend Ivy Tech to create a better life for her and her children. She has a husband, two kids and step-daughter. She has been offered employment at Headstart but will be applying at the Early Learning Center at Eastern Greene. She has received funding as a child of a disabled veteran. Heather has volunteered at American Red Cross. She received a technical certificate along her journey to her Associate of Applied Science degree.  She worked full time for two years while putting both her and her son through school. There were times she wanted to give up and her husband and family encouraged her to keep going. She especially wanted to give up when she had her daughter last year, but made herself keep going. If it wasn’t for the support and love from her family, she says she probably wouldn’t be seeing graduation day. She just kept positive, and telling herself “I can do it.”

Matthew Sterling (Traditional student, honors student in high school and at Ivy Tech, gained employment with degree)

Associate of Applied Science, Computer Information Technology, Magna Cum Laude

Honors graduate, Matt Sterling, has accepted a networking position with Helix Technologies in French Lick.  From wireless to servers and Internet service providers, he will be using his talent in an environment with comprehensive technologies, more than just computers.

Matt graduated with honors from Bloomington High School South.

He will be leaving our campus Computer Technology Services Department with the highest regards upon graduation.

Stefany Terrell (Traditional student, plans to transfer to IU – Kelley School of Business hopeful for International Business and Marketing)

Associate of Applied Science, Computer Information Systems, Cum Laude

I am a traditional student, age 21. I started shortly after graduating high school. I chose Ivy Tech because I am paying out of pocket and it seemed like a good way to get the most for my money, I can get a degree that will quickly put me in the job market while also earning credits that transfer to a university for my Bachelors degree. I plan on attending Ivy Tech for a couple more semesters to earn some more credits to transfer to IU.

I worked full time for the first 2 years at Ivy Tech and then for the past year decided to drop down to part time to focus on my major specific classes but was highly involved around campus but it did take me 3 years to complete my degree.

Member of Student Ambassador program, Student Leadership Academy, and Student Event Staffers. Volunteered for O’Bannon Day of Service and Ivy Tech Day of Service.

Earned Deans and Chancellors List Spring, Summer, and Fall of 2011.

 

 

Ivy Tech students volunteer for Day of Service event

Ivy Tech students volunteer for Day of Service event

by Kathy Kalb, Staff Writer
Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Eleven people worked on a landscaping project at the French Lick Ivy Tech campus on April 26 during the college’s annual Day of Service. The event, sponsored by the Ivy Tech O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, focuses on the college’s unwavering commitment for students, faculty and staff to be good citizens and active participants in their communities.

Among those were campus coordinator Carol Hudelson and husband Jim; Springs Valley students Amber Tinkle, Jayden Wininger, Chastity Mitchell and Morgan Underhill; French Lick Ivy Tech students Charlotte Campbell and Sarah Andrews, both of West Baden Springs, and Jennifer Patton and Joshua Young, both of Paoli, and Kasey Roberson of Bedford.

Along with removing pea gravel from around the Springs Valley Learning Center building, which houses the local Ivy Tech campus, the students and Hudelsons placed decorative rock and planted $100 of annual flowers, along with perennials from the Hudelson farm.
Carol Hudelson said, “I think the students took pride in landscaping [the campus] and are excited to be able to see the flowers grow.”

Photo by Kathy D. Kalb-Jayden Wininger, left, and Morgan Underhill are two of the Springs Valley students who helped with the French Lick Ivy Tech campus landscaping project on April 26.

Education key to challenges of recession

Education key to challenges of recession

Our opinion
May 2, 2012

When George Will visited Bloomington last week to participate in Ivy Tech Community College’s O’Bannon Institute on Public Service, he predicted a rough ride ahead for the nation’s economy.

His reasons were at the federal level — things such as unsustainable entitlements, runaway health care costs — and will result in millions of words on Capitol Hill in the next six months.

But he also said he is not totally pessimistic.

“Things, I think, are going to get better. We are not Bangladesh. We can get better by choosing to get better. We can get better by choosing to make better choices.”

He said while 200 years ago, a great source of wealth in this nation was land, the source of wealth today is knowledge that comes from education.

The general sentiment is shared by experts interviewed for our series of stories called “Recession and the New Reality” that is ending today. The stories outlined many of the challenges that have plagued our regional economy in the last five years and highlighted some of the statistics that show the recession is still not over. They also noted that Monroe and surrounding counties were not hit as hard as much of the rest of the state and nation.

Looking forward, our sources agreed, the keys to success in the economic arena will include the ability to learn and adapt to changing needs of employers — and society.

One source, IU economist Jerry Conover, said the evidence is clear that educational attainment leads to better economic opportunity.

“Education — formal or informal, is key to keeping a job and finding new jobs,” he told the H-T’s Bill Strother.

And doing well on standardized tests is far from good enough. Gone are the days when a concrete set of skills or knowledge is all you need for a career.

“What companies need today are individuals who are prepared to communicate well and to think critically,” said John Whikehart, chancellor of the Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington campus. “(The worker of the future) will probably make three career changes in their lifetime and may end up with seven jobs in those careers.

“Young people, students in school, just need to understand that it’s going to require more education and training than just completing high school. We have to move past that. That’s absolutely critical.”

The recession forced that way of thinking onto thousands of people who lost the jobs for which they had been trained. Our stories introduced readers to a few of those individuals.

The picture painted by Will at the Ivy Tech event was of a future where a lot more people are going to see their bank statements and career paths rocked because of forces outside of their control. They can address the uncertainty of what’s ahead through education, training and the ability to adapt to the seismic shifts in our nation’s and region’s economic stability.


Kevin Wagner, of Bedford, is going back to school at Ivy Tech Community College after being laid off from Sims Poultry after 23 years of service in Bloomington. Chris Howell | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012