Ivy Tech celebrates a decade in its westside digs

The Herald-Times

COMMENTARY
Ivy Tech celebrates a decade in its westside digs

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
July 29, 2012, last update: 7/28 @ 7:50 pm

Bloomington Ivy Tech Chancellor John Whikehart greets students on the first day of fall classes last year. Monty Howell | Herald-Times

It’s not about the building. But then again, in some ways, it is.

People driving through downtown Bloomington or around the Ivy Tech campus last week might have noticed the newly hung banners that tout the community college’s 10-year building anniversary and its goals for student success and civic engagement.

The building is important, no doubt. Before 2002, Ivy Tech was housed in a group of buildings in Westbury Village on the northwest side of Bloomington. A group of buildings designed to be a shopping center.

In the fall of 2002, students walked through the doors of a gleaming, green glass-accented, 148,000-square-foot building that said this is a college and we do important work here.

A lot of factors have come into play over the past decade, but the one thing that is undeniable is that Ivy Tech Bloomington has been successful beyond anyone’s reasonable expectations.

Student enrollment climbed steadily from 2,600 students to the current peak of 6,400. The building designed to accommodate 5,000 already is maxed out and the college has been awaiting state approval to issue bonds and expand since 2007.

Some 4,754 students have earned certificates or degrees. “And those 4,754 students are here in south-central Indiana working here, working in their fields of study, adding to our economy and in most cases supporting their spouses and families,” Chancellor John Whikehart said last week.

“But keep in mind,” he said, “that number is just one number to look at. The largest group of our students are transfer-bound students — students who are literally telling us it’s not their intention to earn a certificate or degree from us but to take their credits on, primarily to Indiana University. And that’s absolutely part of our mission as well.”

When the state of Indiana designated the Ivy Tech system to be the state’s official community college system, it asked Ivy Tech to develop from what was initially a vocational college to a comprehensive community college system. No Ivy Tech location has done that better than Bloomington, which went from 13 courses and 39 possible credit hours that IU would accept to more than 400 credit hours that can be applied to an IU degree.

Ivy Tech may not have a thrilling basketball program or a world renowned opera house, but it does offer quality, accredited courses that cost roughly a third what classes at IU cost.

Ivy Tech students contributed 20,208 hours of volunteer service to its six-county service region last year, or $891,167 worth of help to 80 nonprofit agencies in the region.

And while the campus does very well with its mission of workforce development, it’s also a magnet for Hoosier students like no other Ivy Tech location. Last year, the Bloomington campus had students from 71 of Indiana’s 92 counties — clear proof that the academic quality of the institution is well-recognized.

Few people in Bloomington haven’t seen Chancellor Whikehart out and about, contributing his time and leadership to any number of local endeavors, both serious and fun. Last week, he made a point of noting that the sometimes maligned former IU president Adam Herbert had a big hand in helping Ivy Tech connect with IU. “He came from the Florida system where there was a common course numbering across Florida institutions, and he was very committed to making it easier for courses to transfer from Ivy Tech to IU,” Whikehart said. “He brought Ken Gros Louis back as chancellor and Ken was extraordinarily committed to making those transfers seamless. We now have a very good relationship with IU.”

Ivy Tech greatly enhanced its connection to the Bloomington community when it bought the beleaguered John Waldron Arts Center, spiffed it up, and beefed up its offerings in personal enrichment and professional development.

Ivy Tech’s growth and maturity as a community college has been nothing short of spectacular and an asset to Bloomington and south-central Indiana. The construction of the big green building on Blooomington’s west side was indeed a catalyst, as were Whikehart’s tireless efforts to promote Ivy Tech and the quality of the Ivy Tech faculty.

The college will celebrate its 10th year on Daniels Way all year, but will also rededicate the building in a 4-5 p.m. ceremony at the campus on Sept. 5.

There ought to be a bigger building on the site — given that the Indiana General Assembly approved the design for a new addition in 2007 and approved bonding authority for construction in 2009. The state is withholding approval for the issuance of bonds and construction, however, for what appears to be political purposes more than anything else.

So while some students are back to taking classes in the strip malls near the campus, Ivy Tech has much to be proud of, and many reasons to celebrate 10 years at its current location. When Connie and Steve Ferguson donated $1 million to the school last August, hoping to prod the state to move ahead with expansion, Connie explained the couple’s generosity with the following observation:

“It’s one of those cases where the bricks and mortar made a difference,” she said. “You can see it in the students — they recognize this institution means something.”

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Advertisements

Thanks you note: Lemonade Day

The Herald-Times

Thanks you note

Special to the H-T
July 27, 2012

Lemonade Day

Bloomington Lemonade Day is a vibrant community program that aims to engage all youth in learning first-hand the concepts of entrepreneurship.

Through a partnership that includes the city of Bloomington, Monroe County government, The Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College and The Boys and Girls Clubs of Bloomington, Lemonade Day has established a healthy foundation as a community event that enables all children to develop skills for their future success in the work place and community.

In our first year of offering this program, 213 kids learned from 140 mentors how to become successful independent small business owners. Bloomington Lemonade Day mentors volunteered an average of 25 hours, guiding children through life lessons ranging from business planning to customer service and philanthropy.

On Lemonade Day, young entrepreneurs and their caring adult mentors worked together an average of five hours, sold an average of 115 glasses of lemonade per stand and donated a total of $1,902 to local and national charities.

We graciously thank all our young entrepreneurs and mentors for their strong efforts. Their achievements are impressive by any standard.

The opportunity provided to these young people was possible through the vision and investment of many local philanthropic businesses and organizations.

For their giving and support, Bloomington Lemonade Day offers its deepest gratitude to our Presenting Sponsors, The Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County and First Financial Bank. Both ensured the success of Lemonade Day through lead gifts that made this program available to all who wished to participate.

Many sponsors joined the Bloomington Lemonade Day movement, helping it grow and realize sustainable impact.

For their kindness and support, our heartfelt thanks goes to:

IU Health Bloomington, Old National Bank, The Coleman Foundation, The Cook Group, Hurlow Wealth Management Group, Metropolitan Printing Services, The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce, SCI Kiwanis, BioConvergence, ISU The May Agency, Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, Bloomingfoods, Bloomington Urban Enterprises Association, E2 Taxi, McArdle and Company Builders, Worms Way, First Appraisal Group, Which Wich Superior Sandwiches, Meyer Najem Inc., and World Wide Automotive Service.

We are enormously grateful for all that you have done to teach our youngest citizens about entrepreneurship through your example of giving and kindness.

Thank you to everyone who invested in the success of our young entrepreneurs and visited a stand on lemonade day. Your support made an impact greater than you may know.

Thank you!

Chris Tann

Boys and Girls Clubs of Bloomington

 

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington 10-Year Building Anniversary and Rededication September 5, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 25, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington 10-Year Building Anniversary and Rededication September 5, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is celebrating its 10-year building anniversary of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, and invites the community to save the date for a building rededication ceremony and open house event on September 5, 2012 from 4:00-5:00 p.m. at 200 Daniels Way. Building tours and tours of Ivy Tech nursing, paramedic and technology labs will be available.

“The public is invited to join us as we recognize ten years in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building and celebrate our success responding to community needs,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “We invite you to tour the facility and learn more about the mission of a comprehensive community college.”

“Ten years in the building is a milestone to measure our growth as an Ivy Tech campus,” said Whikehart. “In 1963, the Indiana General Assembly formed the Indiana Vocational Technical College. The Bloomington campus of Ivy Tech first offered classes in 1968. Construction of our current facility began in 2000, and the doors officially opened in 2002. The building was designed to accommodate 5,000 students. Ten years later, in 2012, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has an enrollment of 6,400 full-time students.”

In its ten years in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has measured growing achievements within four main campus goals: focusing on the success of the individual student, being responsive to community and workforce needs, creating and enhancing opportunities for seamless education, and modeling a service-oriented learning environment.

In the last 10 years, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has grown from serving 2,600 students in 2002, to serving 6,400 students in 2012. In addition to acquiring the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has established The Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, The Center for Civic Engagement, The Center for Lifelong Learning and The Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship. Ivy Tech-Bloomington has leased additional space in two locations on Liberty Drive to accommodate rapid growth, and the campus currently serves residents at instructional sites in Lawrence, Martin and Orange Counties.

For more information about Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus, visit www.ivytech.edu/bloomington.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Summer workshop at Ivy Tech gives high school students a taste of bioscience careers

The Herald-Times

Summer workshop at Ivy Tech gives high school students a taste of bioscience careers

By April Toler 331-4353 | atoler@heraldt.com
July 14, 2012

Walking around a lab in Ivy Tech’s Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, 15-year-old Rachael Mosley feels right at home.

In fact, there aren’t many other places the Bloomington High School North student, who’s taking part in the college’s Biotech Summer High School Workshop, would rather spend her summer.

“I really like being in the lab,” said Mosley. “That’s my favorite part.”

Mosley is one of 15 students taking part in this year’s workshop, which, according to Sengyong Lee, professor and program chair of Ivy Tech’s biotechnology program, was developed to increase students’ awareness of bioscience-related careers and to help recruit “well-educated/trained” employees for such jobs.

Because the program is funded through a grant, it is free to students who through completion of the program can also earn three college credits at the college.

“Ivy Tech Bloomington’s biotechnology program has been supplying well-educated workforces to our local bioscience companies, however, we wanted to recruit more high school students to our workforce development pipeline,” Lee said in an email. “Many high school students want to become doctors and nurses but they don’t know much about so many bioscience career options that can make similar positive impact on our society.”

Throughout the students’ nine days in the program, they not only learn about the bioscience industry and career options, but receive hands-on lab experience.

This week, the group was extracting DNA through food items to see if the food had been genetically modified.

“They receive not only experience but an understanding of what biotechnology is and an understanding of what lab work is involved,” said Sarah Cote, professor at Ivy Tech.

Although some students may prefer spending their summer sitting poolside, for Makayla Culbertson, 15, there is nothing better than suiting up in a white lab coat, safety glasses and blue latex gloves and conducting research alongside her fellow, future scientist.

“I’ve always enjoyed science so I don’t mind spending my time in a lab,” she said.

As for the program, Culbertson said it’s a great way to not only study a subject she loves, but to also gain experience that might help her down the road.

“It’s really interesting to learn all this stuff and every bit of experience helps,” she said.


Left to right, Makayla Culbertson, Hannah Busey and Rachael Mosley remove corn meal from a water bath during a nine day biotechnology workshop at Ivy Tech Bloomington. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Ivy Tech Bloomington gets national attention again for service-learning, civic engagement

The Herald-Times

Ivy Tech Bloomington gets national attention again for service-learning, civic engagement

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
July 10, 2012, last update: 7/10 @ 12:03 am


Chancellor John Whikehart greets students on the first day of classes last August at the Ivy Tech Community College campus on Bloomington’s west side. Monty Howell | Herald-Times

Civic engagement was one of the primary goals set by Ivy Tech Bloomington shortly after its current campus opened in 2002.

That goal is being met, if the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is any indication. For the sixth consecutive year, the Bloomington campus has received the highest federal recognition for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement.

The numbers at the westside Bloomington campus have risen every year, with Ivy Tech’s economic contribution to its six-county service area from volunteer activities increasing from $632,956 in 2010-11 to $891,167 in 2011-12. The campus reported nearly 20,208 hours of volunteer service over the past year, assisting 80 nonprofit agencies in the area.

Ivy Tech Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart said this week that while community service has been embedded into the Bloomington campus culture, it also helped that the school upped its number of service-learning courses from 36 to 71 in the past year.

Offering such classes meant that accounting students taking a tax course volunteered to prepare taxes for low-income people.

It meant that marketing students prepared a brochure for Monroe County United Ministries.

It meant that biotechnology students applied what they learned in class by monitoring local streams for water quality and reporting the figures back to governmental officials.

“Service-learning courses create a relevant experiential learning opportunity for students. They’re not just learning about theory. They’re out in the real world, applying what they’ve learned,” Whikehart said.

And that pays off in real contributions to area communities.

“Our surveys of students who have completed a certificate or degree — about 90 percent-plus are still living and working in south-central Indiana and employed in relation to the degree or certificate they earned,” Whikehart said.

“We asked as far back as 2003, what if we modeled some behavior that left us not only with a 90 percent success rate in terms of students giving back to the communities in terms of working local jobs and contributing to the local economy, but what if they left with the same level of commitment to community service?” Whikehart said. “They will be paying or giving something back quite frankly for the education they received.”

Ivy Tech Bloomington was among 642 schools to be selected nationwide and just one of two of Ivy Tech’s 14 primary campuses to receive the presidential honor.

The Bloomington campus is the system’s third-largest and focuses on a six-county area including Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Morgan and Owen counties. The Bloomington campus has an enrollment of 6,400 students, but is rivaled only by the Indianapolis campus for its reach — enrolling students from almost every county in the state.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Ivy Tech Bloomington awarded highest federal recognition for community service

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 9, 2012

Ivy Tech Bloomington awarded highest federal recognition for community service

Ivy Tech-Bloomington has been named to the 2012 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. This is the sixth year in a row Ivy Tech-Bloomington has been awarded. The Honor Roll’s Presidential Award is the highest federal recognition an institution can receive for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement. Ivy Tech-Bloomington was among 642 schools to be selected nationwide.

“Civic engagement is embedded in the campus culture,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart. “Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s volunteerism and service-learning activities are part of the campus’ mission to model a service-oriented learning environment. Every year, service-learning and volunteer activities are organized and tracked through Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Center for Civic Engagement.”

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus reported nearly 20,208 hours of volunteer service from May 2011 to May 2012, serving 80 nonprofit agencies in the area. This year, Ivy Tech-Bloomington offered 71 service-learning courses for students, up from 36 courses in the academic year 2010/2011.

In a dollar figure based on national volunteer averages from Independent Sector (www.independentsector.org), Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s economic contribution of both service learning and volunteerism is $891,167.42 up from $632,956.23 in the academic year 2010/2011.

The Center for Civic Engagement (http://www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/civicengagement) was established at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus in 2004 to bring focus to individual volunteerism, service-learning in the classroom, and community involvement. The Center for Civic Engagement is also the host of community engagement programs like Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service held each spring.

Ivy Tech’s North Central campus also received the award this year. For a full list of colleges awarded in Indiana and nationwide, visit http://www.nationalservice.gov/pdf/2012_hr_awardees.pdf

About the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll

The President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) and the U.S. Department of Education.

The President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll recognizes institutions of higher education that support exemplary community service programs and raise the visibility of best practices in campus-community partnerships. The Honor Roll’s Presidential Award is the highest federal recognition an institution can receive for its commitment to service-learning and civic engagement.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

-30-

Ivy Tech ‘College for Kids’ teaches them how to cook, budget

The Herald-Times

Ivy Tech ‘College for Kids’ teaches them how to cook, budget

By Derek J. Amaya
331-4356 | damaya@heraldt.com

June 30, 2012

Grilled chicken, turkey burgers and chocolate mousse are prepared straight from the kitchen next door and served in the conference room for diners to enjoy.

The food is prepared by middle and high school students in the Ivy Tech kitchen for the “College for Kids” cooking session, but resembles what you’d find in any popular restaurant.

Chef Jeffrey Tabor, program chairman for Hospitality Administration, taught the students how to cook, budget money for food and nutritional facts about the food they cook

“We focused on the fundamental skills,” he said. “We showed them different ways to cook eggs, bacon, pizza and chocolate mousse.”

The weeklong session ended Friday with the students preparing a lunch for their parents.

“I was really impressed,” Tabor said. “Today was more independent for them. They did not have as much direction from us. They did great.”

Harrison Cox, a participant in the program, said he learned a lot and hopes to be able to cook for his mom.

“I learned how to chop things,” he said. “I learned how to grill chicken, beef and different poultry.”

Sheri Cox, his mother, said she is excited to see what he will cook for her and see what he has learned.

“It’s not only cooking skills; it’s life skills,” she said. “Once they go to college, they can use the skills they learned like budgeting money. It’s important for them to know that.”

Susie Graham, director of the Center for Lifelong Learning at Ivy Tech, added independence is something kids want and the program is a way for them to experience some independence.

“What we’ve done this week will be a springboard for additional programs,” she said. “Clearly there was a demand for this. The 15 students filled up quickly, and we had a waiting list.”

At the end of the day, the parents of the students were pleased with what had been prepared for them and served to them. And for some, it won’t be the last time they’ll enjoy their child’s culinary creations. Some students said they hope to one day be future chefs.

“I’m happy I came,” said Harrison Cox. “I learned a lot.”

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012