Ivy Tech student theatre production tickets now available

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 30, 2012

Ivy Tech student theatre production tickets now available

Tickets are now available for Ivy Tech’s fall and spring student theatre productions at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

This fall, see the Ivy Tech student production The Rimers of Eldritch by Lanford Wilson,directed by Paul Daily, Nov. 9, 10, 14 – 17.

Stay tuned for Ivy Tech student productions in 2013: Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, directed by Patricia McKee, and The Giver, adapted by Eric Coble from the Newbery Award-winning book by Lois Lowry, directed by Jeffery Allen.

“Ivy Tech student productions are strong stories, told simply, that engage the audience’s collective imagination,” said Paul Daily, Ivy Tech Waldron Artistic Director. “Ivy Tech productions embrace the very nature of live theatre – a medium where you can do what is impossible in other mediums. A white sheet can become a ghost, a splashing of water in a tub can become a vast swamp, and suddenly the entire room is somewhere else entirely, once the imagination is caught.”

“Ivy Tech student productions force actors to rely on the only two tools they bring into the space with them – their bodies and their voices,” Daily said. “Our students quickly learn that the most effective technique is the one that works when there’s nothing else on stage.”

Ivy Tech Waldron’s first student production, Waiting for Lefty, was a good example of Ivy Tech’s approach to theatre. “The architecture of the performance space was modified only slightly, and the seating arrangement allowed the audience to find themselves caught up in and a part of the production,” Daily said.

Jeffery Allen, Assistant Director of the Ivy Tech Center for Lifelong Learning, will direct the Ivy Tech student production The Giver. “In The Giver, the playwright leaves a note that a colorless apple ‘flashes red’ for a moment – how do we show this in a way that is not reliant on high-tech tricks associated with film and television,” Allen said. “This is the single most exciting aspect of working with students at Ivy Tech – the chance to create a theatrical laboratory, where we experiment with ideas and methods of storytelling.”

“By relying on simple, intimate theatre, not over-burdened by the technical elements, but simply on the tools every actor possesses: breath, voice, body, soul, we can illuminate the entire universe in a small place,” Allen said.

Tickets are available for purchase at the Buskirk-Chumley box office, or by visiting http://www.bctboxoffice.com/. For The Rimers of Eldritch and The Giver, tickets are $15/general admission and $5/students and seniors. For Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, tickets are $25/general admission, and $15/students and seniors.

This season, the Ivy Tech Waldron will host more than 15 productions. For a full list of productions held at the Ivy Tech Waldron, visit www.ivytech.edu/waldron.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is the Indiana Arts Commission (IAC) Regional Arts Partner for the IAC’s Region 8. Region 8 includes Brown, Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Orange, and Owen counties. For IAC region 8 news, visit www.ivytech.edu/bloomington and click on Indiana Arts Commission Regional Arts Partner.

About Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center

The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center houses a unique blend of artists, performers, and educators. Visitors can take art classes, enjoy a performance, or browse six gallery spaces in Bloomington’s recently-voted “best art gallery” by The-Herald-Times’ Reader’s Choice Awards. For more information, visit www.ivytech.edu/waldron. Art classes are offered through Ivy Tech’s Center for Lifelong Learning at www.ivytech.edu/cll or through Ivy Tech’s Associate of Fine Arts degree program (www.ivytech.edu/academics).

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Beloved teacher advises students: Just keep writing

The Herald-Times

Beloved teacher advises students: Just keep writing

Writing class can be therapeutic for students

By Jessica Williams
331-4352 | jwilliams@heraldt.com

October 28, 2012

BLOOMINGTON — Memories echoed off the walls in a downstairs classroom of the downtown Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center as students shared their assignments in Ferne Stout’s “My Life Stories” writing workshop course earlier this month.

Stout has taught 12 writing classes in five years. The Nebraska native also has two published books about growing up in the 1920s and 30s in the Cornhusker State.

It’s not a genealogy course; it’s teaching how to write life stories, she said. She encourages her students to put family memories on paper for their families.

“What do you want your children to remember about you? Maybe your children are asking about grandma because the grandma or grandpa might be gone but they’ve heard a lot about them and they might want to know more about them,” Stout said. “So that’s what I’m encouraging them (the students) to do.”

And it doesn’t need to be perfect, Stout said; there are no writing rules, she stresses in her courses.

“You can’t follow rules when you’re writing memoirs,” she said.

One general class rule, however, is that students must share what they write.

Susie Graham, executive director for Ivy Tech’s Center of Lifelong Learning at the Waldron, said Stout’s classes are always filled to capacity.

“Ferne is a treasure trove for us,” Graham said in a recent email. “She’s a committed instructor and takes her role mentoring new writers very seriously.”

On an aggregate rating scale of instructor attributes, Stout scores highly among students.

“I have been wanting to learn how to write my life story for a couple of years, but no classes were available in my town,” one student evaluation read. “This class is the answer to my prayers.”

Some of Stout’s students have written of World War II memories and experiences. And sometimes her students are reminded of their own memories when hearing from their classmates.

“That’s what makes it so interesting,” Stout said of the varied personal histories.

It gets “very personal” in her classes, she said. If her students want to see it as therapeutic, it can be, Stout said. They’re encouraged to be natural, leaving in curse words and memories of abuse.

This fall, the class is all women. Overall, her students tend to be age 50-plus, but one student was in her early 90s.

“So you see, you’re never too old,” Stout said.

Her advice to her students is fundamental.

“Don’t quit writing,” she said.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Max Gosman, NYC theatre artist, named Ivy Tech-Bloomington Distinguished Alumni

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 23, 2012

Max Gosman, NYC theatre artist, named Ivy Tech-Bloomington Distinguished Alumni

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington has named Max Gosman, NYC theatre artist, its Distinguished Alumni. Gosman was presented with the honor at a luncheon hosted by the Ivy Tech Community College Foundation at West Baden Springs Hotel in French Lick, Ind. on Friday, October 12.

Gosman attended Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus immediately following high school graduation. He spent two semesters at Ivy Tech-Bloomington before transferring his Liberal Arts degree program credits to Ball State University, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatrical Production with an emphasis in Directing.

During his time at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus, Max served as student ambassador and provided support to the Office of Student Affairs. He was an active participant in the 2008 O’Bannon Institute for Community Service and a community volunteer at Hoosier Hills Food Bank.

“I owe much of my success to Sam DeWeese, Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, who served as my mentor and role model during my time at Ivy Tech and beyond,” Gosman said.

During his time at Ball State University, Gosman received the award for Outstanding Student Production for his work on the Midwest premier of The Destruction of Curves by Chicago playwright Alice Austen. He served as dramaturgical consultant to Sutton Foster on the Broadway revival of Anything Goes, and was awarded the Excellence in Public Outreach Award at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival.

As a writer, Gosman contributed to The Circus in Winter, a new musical that will premier this fall at the New American Musical Theatre Festival in New York City. He spent one semester as an artistic intern at Chicago Dramatists, and assistant to director John Rando on the Broadway-bound national tour of A Christmas Story the Musical.

In the spring of 2012, Gosman directed Dog See God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead at the historic Muncie Civic Theatre, which benefited the Trevor Project, a service organization for LGBT teenagers.

Six days following graduation from BSU in spring 2012, Gosman moved to NYC to pursue a career as a theatre artist. Since moving to the City, Gosman has assistant directed three world premier musicals at the New York Fringe Festival, Midtown Theatre Festival, and New York Musical Festival. Standby: The Musical was selected to be reprised during Fringe Encores at the end of the summer.

When Gosman is not in the rehearsal room, his hobbies include photography and exploring NYC on his bicycle.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech video is a winner

Ivy Tech video is a winner

H-T Report
October 19, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus won $25,000 for “best entrepreneurship program promotional video” at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship.

The conference was held earlier this month in Chicago.

Bloomington’s entry was one of eight contest submissions from schools across the country. The videos showed college entrepreneurs in action.

The promotional video, produced by Blueline in Bloomington, highlights the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship, according to a news release from Ivy Tech.

Ivy Tech won for “best execution of the entrepreneur engagement strategy” among last year’s “elevator” grant award recipients. At last year’s national conference, 11 colleges were awarded such grants by the Coleman Foundation, which sponsored the video award.

“We are very pleased to receive this generous award from the Coleman Foundation, in recognition of the work being done at the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship to benefit our students and the communities we serve,” said Bloomington campus Chancellor John Whikehart in the release.

“This award will enable Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus to further develop entrepreneurship engagement through our Cook Center.”

The three-day conference, which marked the national group’s 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, drew more than 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world.

To view video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xvpBL3L26LI

Ivy Tech Campus Wins Entrepreneurship Award

Ivy Tech Campus Wins Entrepreneurship Award

InsideINdianaBusiness.com Report

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington has won $25,000 for a promotional video (http://www.insideindianabusiness.com/newsitem.asp?ID=56172) at the Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship. The school’s video promotes the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship.

October 17, 2012

News Release

Bloomington, Ind. — Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has been awarded $25,000 for “best entrepreneurship program promotional video” at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), held in Chicago October 7-10. Ivy Tech-Bloomington was one of eight colleges nationwide that submitted videos showing its entrepreneurs in action.

The promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xvpBL3L26LI), produced by Blueline in Bloomington, Ind., promotes the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship. The award was presented by the Coleman Foundation for “best execution of the entrepreneur engagement strategy” among last year’s elevator grant award recipients. At last year’s national NACCE conference, 11 colleges were awarded elevator grants by the Coleman Foundation for their programs.

“We are very pleased to receive this generous award from the Coleman Foundation, in recognition of the work being done at the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship to benefit our students and the communities we serve,” said Chancellor John Whikehart, Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “This award will enable Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus to further develop entrepreneurship engagement through our Cook Center.”

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart was one of five college leaders from across the nation who was asked by NACCE to speak at the annual national conference He was asked to speak about how to maximize exposure for community college entrepreneurial education programs.

Other Ivy Tech-Bloomington representatives presented session topics covering growth issues for entrepreneurs and experiential learning opportunities for students.

The three day conference, which marked NACCEs 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, drew more than 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world.

About the Coleman Foundation

The Coleman Foundation (http://www.colemanfoundation.org/) is a private, independent grant-making foundation established in 1951. The Foundation supports educational institutions offering entrepreneurship education across the country, organizations providing cancer care, treatment and support, and agencies providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities only in the Chicago Metropolitan area – its primary geographical focus.

About NACCE

The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) (http://www.nacce.com) is an organization of educators, entrepreneurs, and distinguished business development professionals providing quality programs and services in entrepreneurship education and serving as advocates of community-based entrepreneurship. Founded in 2002, NACCE is at the heart of the “entrepreneurship movement.” Through membership, an annual conference and exhibition, a quarterly journal, monthly webinars and podcasts, a dynamic list-serve, and other resources, NACCE serves as the hub for the dissemination and integration of knowledge and successful practices regarding entrepreneurship education and student business incubation. NACCE is a founding member of the White House-led Startup America Partnership.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Source: Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech-Bloomington entrepreneurship video wins $25,000 award at national conference

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 11, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington entrepreneurship video wins $25,000 award at national conference

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has been awarded $25,000 for “best entrepreneurship program promotional video” at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), held in Chicago October 7-10. Ivy Tech-Bloomington was one of eight colleges nationwide that submitted videos showing its entrepreneurs in action.

The promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xvpBL3L26LI), produced by Blueline in Bloomington, Ind., promotes the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship. The award was presented by the Coleman Foundation for “best execution of the entrepreneur engagement strategy” among last year’s elevator grant award recipients. At last year’s national NACCE conference, 11 colleges were awarded elevator grants by the Coleman Foundation for their programs.

“We are very pleased to receive this generous award from the Coleman Foundation, in recognition of the work being done at the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship to benefit our students and the communities we serve,” said Chancellor John Whikehart, Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “This award will enable Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus to further develop entrepreneurship engagement through our Cook Center.”

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart was one of five college leaders from across the nation who was asked by NACCE to speak at the annual national conference. He was asked to speak about how to maximize exposure for community college entrepreneurial education programs.

Other Ivy Tech-Bloomington representatives presented session topics covering growth issues for entrepreneurs and experiential learning opportunities for students.

The three day conference, which marked NACCEs 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, drew more than 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world.

About the Coleman Foundation
The Coleman Foundation (http://www.colemanfoundation.org/) is a private, independent grant-making foundation established in 1951. The Foundation supports educational institutions offering entrepreneurship education across the country, organizations providing cancer care, treatment and support, and agencies providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities only in the Chicago Metropolitan area – its primary geographical focus.

About NACCE

The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) (http://www.nacce.com) is an organization of educators, entrepreneurs, and distinguished business development professionals providing quality programs and services in entrepreneurship education and serving as advocates of community-based entrepreneurship. Founded in 2002, NACCE is at the heart of the “entrepreneurship movement.” Through membership, an annual conference and exhibition, a quarterly journal, monthly webinars and podcasts, a dynamic list-serve, and other resources, NACCE serves as the hub for the dissemination and integration of knowledge and successful practices regarding entrepreneurship education and student business incubation. NACCE is a founding member of the White House-led Startup America Partnership.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Video: How to make chicken stock

Kitchen Know-How

Video: How to make chicken stock

H-T Report
October 10, 2012

The Herald-Times, in collaboration with Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, features kitchen skills and more on Wednesdays. Chef Jeff Taber, an associate professor at Ivy Tech and program chairman of the Hospitality Administration program, shares skills and techniques.

HTlivepage: Watch a video of Chef Taber showing how to make chicken stock using parts of the chicken he cut into pieces in his last video.

View the video by downloading the free HTlive page app, available by going to either the AppStore for Apple products or the Google Play Store for Android, and then aiming your smartphone or tablet at Taber’s photograph, not the icon.

Once it begins playing, double-tap the video to move your device away from the page.

You can watch videos with any image in the newspaper that has the live icon symbol next to it.


Chef Jeff Taber

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012