Ivy Tech student theatre production tickets now available

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 30, 2012

Ivy Tech student theatre production tickets now available

Tickets are now available for Ivy Tech’s fall and spring student theatre productions at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

This fall, see the Ivy Tech student production The Rimers of Eldritch by Lanford Wilson,directed by Paul Daily, Nov. 9, 10, 14 – 17.

Stay tuned for Ivy Tech student productions in 2013: Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, directed by Patricia McKee, and The Giver, adapted by Eric Coble from the Newbery Award-winning book by Lois Lowry, directed by Jeffery Allen.

“Ivy Tech student productions are strong stories, told simply, that engage the audience’s collective imagination,” said Paul Daily, Ivy Tech Waldron Artistic Director. “Ivy Tech productions embrace the very nature of live theatre – a medium where you can do what is impossible in other mediums. A white sheet can become a ghost, a splashing of water in a tub can become a vast swamp, and suddenly the entire room is somewhere else entirely, once the imagination is caught.”

“Ivy Tech student productions force actors to rely on the only two tools they bring into the space with them – their bodies and their voices,” Daily said. “Our students quickly learn that the most effective technique is the one that works when there’s nothing else on stage.”

Ivy Tech Waldron’s first student production, Waiting for Lefty, was a good example of Ivy Tech’s approach to theatre. “The architecture of the performance space was modified only slightly, and the seating arrangement allowed the audience to find themselves caught up in and a part of the production,” Daily said.

Jeffery Allen, Assistant Director of the Ivy Tech Center for Lifelong Learning, will direct the Ivy Tech student production The Giver. “In The Giver, the playwright leaves a note that a colorless apple ‘flashes red’ for a moment – how do we show this in a way that is not reliant on high-tech tricks associated with film and television,” Allen said. “This is the single most exciting aspect of working with students at Ivy Tech – the chance to create a theatrical laboratory, where we experiment with ideas and methods of storytelling.”

“By relying on simple, intimate theatre, not over-burdened by the technical elements, but simply on the tools every actor possesses: breath, voice, body, soul, we can illuminate the entire universe in a small place,” Allen said.

Tickets are available for purchase at the Buskirk-Chumley box office, or by visiting http://www.bctboxoffice.com/. For The Rimers of Eldritch and The Giver, tickets are $15/general admission and $5/students and seniors. For Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, tickets are $25/general admission, and $15/students and seniors.

This season, the Ivy Tech Waldron will host more than 15 productions. For a full list of productions held at the Ivy Tech Waldron, visit www.ivytech.edu/waldron.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is the Indiana Arts Commission (IAC) Regional Arts Partner for the IAC’s Region 8. Region 8 includes Brown, Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Orange, and Owen counties. For IAC region 8 news, visit www.ivytech.edu/bloomington and click on Indiana Arts Commission Regional Arts Partner.

About Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center

The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center houses a unique blend of artists, performers, and educators. Visitors can take art classes, enjoy a performance, or browse six gallery spaces in Bloomington’s recently-voted “best art gallery” by The-Herald-Times’ Reader’s Choice Awards. For more information, visit www.ivytech.edu/waldron. Art classes are offered through Ivy Tech’s Center for Lifelong Learning at www.ivytech.edu/cll or through Ivy Tech’s Associate of Fine Arts degree program (www.ivytech.edu/academics).

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Beloved teacher advises students: Just keep writing

The Herald-Times

Beloved teacher advises students: Just keep writing

Writing class can be therapeutic for students

By Jessica Williams
331-4352 | jwilliams@heraldt.com

October 28, 2012

BLOOMINGTON — Memories echoed off the walls in a downstairs classroom of the downtown Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center as students shared their assignments in Ferne Stout’s “My Life Stories” writing workshop course earlier this month.

Stout has taught 12 writing classes in five years. The Nebraska native also has two published books about growing up in the 1920s and 30s in the Cornhusker State.

It’s not a genealogy course; it’s teaching how to write life stories, she said. She encourages her students to put family memories on paper for their families.

“What do you want your children to remember about you? Maybe your children are asking about grandma because the grandma or grandpa might be gone but they’ve heard a lot about them and they might want to know more about them,” Stout said. “So that’s what I’m encouraging them (the students) to do.”

And it doesn’t need to be perfect, Stout said; there are no writing rules, she stresses in her courses.

“You can’t follow rules when you’re writing memoirs,” she said.

One general class rule, however, is that students must share what they write.

Susie Graham, executive director for Ivy Tech’s Center of Lifelong Learning at the Waldron, said Stout’s classes are always filled to capacity.

“Ferne is a treasure trove for us,” Graham said in a recent email. “She’s a committed instructor and takes her role mentoring new writers very seriously.”

On an aggregate rating scale of instructor attributes, Stout scores highly among students.

“I have been wanting to learn how to write my life story for a couple of years, but no classes were available in my town,” one student evaluation read. “This class is the answer to my prayers.”

Some of Stout’s students have written of World War II memories and experiences. And sometimes her students are reminded of their own memories when hearing from their classmates.

“That’s what makes it so interesting,” Stout said of the varied personal histories.

It gets “very personal” in her classes, she said. If her students want to see it as therapeutic, it can be, Stout said. They’re encouraged to be natural, leaving in curse words and memories of abuse.

This fall, the class is all women. Overall, her students tend to be age 50-plus, but one student was in her early 90s.

“So you see, you’re never too old,” Stout said.

Her advice to her students is fundamental.

“Don’t quit writing,” she said.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Max Gosman, NYC theatre artist, named Ivy Tech-Bloomington Distinguished Alumni

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 23, 2012

Max Gosman, NYC theatre artist, named Ivy Tech-Bloomington Distinguished Alumni

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington has named Max Gosman, NYC theatre artist, its Distinguished Alumni. Gosman was presented with the honor at a luncheon hosted by the Ivy Tech Community College Foundation at West Baden Springs Hotel in French Lick, Ind. on Friday, October 12.

Gosman attended Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus immediately following high school graduation. He spent two semesters at Ivy Tech-Bloomington before transferring his Liberal Arts degree program credits to Ball State University, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatrical Production with an emphasis in Directing.

During his time at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus, Max served as student ambassador and provided support to the Office of Student Affairs. He was an active participant in the 2008 O’Bannon Institute for Community Service and a community volunteer at Hoosier Hills Food Bank.

“I owe much of my success to Sam DeWeese, Assistant Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, who served as my mentor and role model during my time at Ivy Tech and beyond,” Gosman said.

During his time at Ball State University, Gosman received the award for Outstanding Student Production for his work on the Midwest premier of The Destruction of Curves by Chicago playwright Alice Austen. He served as dramaturgical consultant to Sutton Foster on the Broadway revival of Anything Goes, and was awarded the Excellence in Public Outreach Award at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival.

As a writer, Gosman contributed to The Circus in Winter, a new musical that will premier this fall at the New American Musical Theatre Festival in New York City. He spent one semester as an artistic intern at Chicago Dramatists, and assistant to director John Rando on the Broadway-bound national tour of A Christmas Story the Musical.

In the spring of 2012, Gosman directed Dog See God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead at the historic Muncie Civic Theatre, which benefited the Trevor Project, a service organization for LGBT teenagers.

Six days following graduation from BSU in spring 2012, Gosman moved to NYC to pursue a career as a theatre artist. Since moving to the City, Gosman has assistant directed three world premier musicals at the New York Fringe Festival, Midtown Theatre Festival, and New York Musical Festival. Standby: The Musical was selected to be reprised during Fringe Encores at the end of the summer.

When Gosman is not in the rehearsal room, his hobbies include photography and exploring NYC on his bicycle.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech video is a winner

Ivy Tech video is a winner

H-T Report
October 19, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus won $25,000 for “best entrepreneurship program promotional video” at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship.

The conference was held earlier this month in Chicago.

Bloomington’s entry was one of eight contest submissions from schools across the country. The videos showed college entrepreneurs in action.

The promotional video, produced by Blueline in Bloomington, highlights the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship, according to a news release from Ivy Tech.

Ivy Tech won for “best execution of the entrepreneur engagement strategy” among last year’s “elevator” grant award recipients. At last year’s national conference, 11 colleges were awarded such grants by the Coleman Foundation, which sponsored the video award.

“We are very pleased to receive this generous award from the Coleman Foundation, in recognition of the work being done at the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship to benefit our students and the communities we serve,” said Bloomington campus Chancellor John Whikehart in the release.

“This award will enable Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus to further develop entrepreneurship engagement through our Cook Center.”

The three-day conference, which marked the national group’s 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, drew more than 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world.

To view video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xvpBL3L26LI

Ivy Tech Campus Wins Entrepreneurship Award

Ivy Tech Campus Wins Entrepreneurship Award

InsideINdianaBusiness.com Report

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington has won $25,000 for a promotional video (http://www.insideindianabusiness.com/newsitem.asp?ID=56172) at the Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship. The school’s video promotes the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship.

October 17, 2012

News Release

Bloomington, Ind. — Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has been awarded $25,000 for “best entrepreneurship program promotional video” at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), held in Chicago October 7-10. Ivy Tech-Bloomington was one of eight colleges nationwide that submitted videos showing its entrepreneurs in action.

The promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xvpBL3L26LI), produced by Blueline in Bloomington, Ind., promotes the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship. The award was presented by the Coleman Foundation for “best execution of the entrepreneur engagement strategy” among last year’s elevator grant award recipients. At last year’s national NACCE conference, 11 colleges were awarded elevator grants by the Coleman Foundation for their programs.

“We are very pleased to receive this generous award from the Coleman Foundation, in recognition of the work being done at the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship to benefit our students and the communities we serve,” said Chancellor John Whikehart, Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “This award will enable Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus to further develop entrepreneurship engagement through our Cook Center.”

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart was one of five college leaders from across the nation who was asked by NACCE to speak at the annual national conference He was asked to speak about how to maximize exposure for community college entrepreneurial education programs.

Other Ivy Tech-Bloomington representatives presented session topics covering growth issues for entrepreneurs and experiential learning opportunities for students.

The three day conference, which marked NACCEs 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, drew more than 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world.

About the Coleman Foundation

The Coleman Foundation (http://www.colemanfoundation.org/) is a private, independent grant-making foundation established in 1951. The Foundation supports educational institutions offering entrepreneurship education across the country, organizations providing cancer care, treatment and support, and agencies providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities only in the Chicago Metropolitan area – its primary geographical focus.

About NACCE

The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) (http://www.nacce.com) is an organization of educators, entrepreneurs, and distinguished business development professionals providing quality programs and services in entrepreneurship education and serving as advocates of community-based entrepreneurship. Founded in 2002, NACCE is at the heart of the “entrepreneurship movement.” Through membership, an annual conference and exhibition, a quarterly journal, monthly webinars and podcasts, a dynamic list-serve, and other resources, NACCE serves as the hub for the dissemination and integration of knowledge and successful practices regarding entrepreneurship education and student business incubation. NACCE is a founding member of the White House-led Startup America Partnership.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Source: Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech-Bloomington entrepreneurship video wins $25,000 award at national conference

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 11, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington entrepreneurship video wins $25,000 award at national conference

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has been awarded $25,000 for “best entrepreneurship program promotional video” at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), held in Chicago October 7-10. Ivy Tech-Bloomington was one of eight colleges nationwide that submitted videos showing its entrepreneurs in action.

The promotional video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xvpBL3L26LI), produced by Blueline in Bloomington, Ind., promotes the college’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship. The award was presented by the Coleman Foundation for “best execution of the entrepreneur engagement strategy” among last year’s elevator grant award recipients. At last year’s national NACCE conference, 11 colleges were awarded elevator grants by the Coleman Foundation for their programs.

“We are very pleased to receive this generous award from the Coleman Foundation, in recognition of the work being done at the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship to benefit our students and the communities we serve,” said Chancellor John Whikehart, Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “This award will enable Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus to further develop entrepreneurship engagement through our Cook Center.”

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart was one of five college leaders from across the nation who was asked by NACCE to speak at the annual national conference. He was asked to speak about how to maximize exposure for community college entrepreneurial education programs.

Other Ivy Tech-Bloomington representatives presented session topics covering growth issues for entrepreneurs and experiential learning opportunities for students.

The three day conference, which marked NACCEs 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, drew more than 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world.

About the Coleman Foundation
The Coleman Foundation (http://www.colemanfoundation.org/) is a private, independent grant-making foundation established in 1951. The Foundation supports educational institutions offering entrepreneurship education across the country, organizations providing cancer care, treatment and support, and agencies providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities only in the Chicago Metropolitan area – its primary geographical focus.

About NACCE

The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) (http://www.nacce.com) is an organization of educators, entrepreneurs, and distinguished business development professionals providing quality programs and services in entrepreneurship education and serving as advocates of community-based entrepreneurship. Founded in 2002, NACCE is at the heart of the “entrepreneurship movement.” Through membership, an annual conference and exhibition, a quarterly journal, monthly webinars and podcasts, a dynamic list-serve, and other resources, NACCE serves as the hub for the dissemination and integration of knowledge and successful practices regarding entrepreneurship education and student business incubation. NACCE is a founding member of the White House-led Startup America Partnership.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Video: How to make chicken stock

Kitchen Know-How

Video: How to make chicken stock

H-T Report
October 10, 2012

The Herald-Times, in collaboration with Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, features kitchen skills and more on Wednesdays. Chef Jeff Taber, an associate professor at Ivy Tech and program chairman of the Hospitality Administration program, shares skills and techniques.

HTlivepage: Watch a video of Chef Taber showing how to make chicken stock using parts of the chicken he cut into pieces in his last video.

View the video by downloading the free HTlive page app, available by going to either the AppStore for Apple products or the Google Play Store for Android, and then aiming your smartphone or tablet at Taber’s photograph, not the icon.

Once it begins playing, double-tap the video to move your device away from the page.

You can watch videos with any image in the newspaper that has the live icon symbol next to it.


Chef Jeff Taber

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

Ivy Tech culinary arts program earns accreditation

Ivy Tech culinary arts program earns accreditation

H-T Report
October 10, 2012

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington announced that its associate of applied science degree in hospitality administration: culinary arts concentration has earned full accreditation for three years by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation.

“This accreditation confirms the program is meeting outcomes set by a national standard,” said Jeffery Taber, Ivy Tech-Bloomington hospitality program chairman, in a news release. “With this, students will now have the opportunity to graduate from the culinary concentration with the first-level industry certification, certified culinarian, in addition to the associate of applied science degree in hospitality administration.”

Earlier this year, Ivy Tech-Bloomington also announced the addition of a hospitality administration: baking and pastry concentration.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Hospitality Administration degree program offers certification and degree options in culinary arts, culinology, baking and pastry arts, and hospitality management with areas of emphasis in restaurant management, hotel management and event management.

For information about Ivy Tech degree program offerings, visit www.ivytech.edu.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

Ivy Tech-Bloomington chosen as presenter at annual national community college entrepreneurship conference

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 8, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington chosen as presenter at annual national community college entrepreneurship conference

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has been chosen to present at the 10th Annual Conference of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), being held in Chicago October 7-10. Ivy Tech-Bloomington is hosting three separate presentations at the conference.

The three day conference, which marks NACCEs 10th year as a major force in entrepreneurship education, is expected to draw 500 community college administrators and faculty from across the nation and around the world. Over 50 learning sessions and workshops will be held to share information on the work being done at community colleges in the United States.

Presenters for Ivy Tech-Bloomington include: John Whikehart, Chancellor; Steve Bryant, Executive Director, Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship; Linda Williamson, President, Linda Williams Consulting LLC; and Andrew Lambert, Adjunct Faculty for Business Administration.

“Part of the strategic plan of the college is to support and respond to the economic development needs of the community, and Ivy Tech-Bloomington developed the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship as a way to stimulate the local economy and support aspiring entrepreneurs within the college and communities we serve,” said John Whikehart, Chancellor of Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart is one of five college leaders from across the nation who has been asked by NACCE to speak at the annual national conference, and will talk about how to maximize exposure for community college entrepreneurial education programs.

Other Ivy Tech-Bloomington session presentations will cover growth issues for entrepreneurs, as well as experiential learning opportunities for students.

This marks the second time that Ivy Tech-Bloomington will present at the annual national NACCE Conference.  

About NACCE

The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) (http://www.nacce.com) is an organization of educators, entrepreneurs, and distinguished business development professionals providing quality programs and services in entrepreneurship education and serving as advocates of community-based entrepreneurship. Founded in 2002, NACCE is at the heart of the “entrepreneurship movement.” Through membership, an annual conference and exhibition, a quarterly journal, monthly webinars and podcasts, a dynamic list-serve, and other resources, NACCE serves as the hub for the dissemination and integration of knowledge and successful practices regarding entrepreneurship education and student business incubation. NACCE is a founding member of the White House-led Startup America Partnership.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

 

Arts reborn: Instruction in the arts finds vibrant new life with Ivy Tech takeover of Waldron

The Herald Times

Arts reborn: Instruction in the arts finds vibrant new life with Ivy Tech takeover of Waldron

By Jessica Williams
331-4352 | jwilliams@heraldt.com
October 7, 2012

BLOOMINGTON — From the flick of a pencil to the click of a camera, Ivy Tech’s noncredit courses are drawing in community members.

The first year the community college’s Center for Lifelong Learning moved to the John Waldron Arts Center, total enrollment in the program rose a whopping 55 percent.

“There is no question this growth is directly attributable to our presence in the Waldron and our new ability to offer arts for both youth and adult audiences,” said Susie Graham, director of the Ivy Tech Center for Lifelong Learning.

That move, from the old train depot now home to Macri’s Deli, happened in April 2010. Prior to the move, the Center for Lifelong Learning offered no youth arts and only a small number of noncredit adult art classes. It didn’t have the space for many offerings.

What a difference location makes.

“Moving into this building transformed our ability to do arts-related programming,” Graham said.

And registrations are still on an upswing. For the 2011-2012 academic year, Center for Lifelong Learning registrations were up 31 percent over the previous year.

Classes are held at several other locations as well, including the main campus on Daniels Way, the Liberty Drive and Liberty Crossing locations, the Bloomington Cooking School and Bell Trace Senior Living Community. The Center for Lifelong Learning also holds classes in Orleans, Mitchell and French Lick.

Cost of classes

In these economic times, Ivy Tech wants these life-enhancing classes to be affordable. The current fall catalog of classes offers for $129 a watercolors class that meets for six Tuesdays, three hours each meeting, for example. A 12-week clay class is $399, while writing classes, which require fewer materials, are in the $27-$49 range.

Graham said she has no way of knowing who out there isn’t taking classes due to a lack of funds.

But the information she does have is stunning.

“What we do know is that we continue to increase in our participants every single semester. I’m pinching myself with this; we are up 9.5 percent over this time last year.”

Every external factor points to a decrease, but Ivy Tech folks aren’t seeing it.

Instead, they can see that what they do is important to people and it isn’t a financial burden, Graham said.

Plus, they offer scholarships for those who need it.

“We try to be responsive to those individual instances when they come to us,” Graham said.

Center a draw for kids

The Center for Lifelong Learning also offers the Ivy Arts for Kids program.

Paul Rogers’ son Ben, 12, has been taking Ivy Arts classes for a couple of years.

The Waldron, Paul said, is a gift to the community.

“The cost is affordable, too,” he said.

Ben’s talented, Paul said, and the teachers at the Waldron bring out his son’s creativity.

Ben, a sixth-grader at Childs Elementary, is into pottery and ceramics and his dad said his son will take more classes at the Waldron in the future.

Bloomington could always use more outlets for creativity, and the Waldron accomplishes that, Paul said.

Ben considers art peaceful, relaxing and a stress reliever.

“I think art is a good outlet to express yourself,” he said.

He likes to sculpt, especially abstract buildings, and he loves his teachers, who are encouraging and help with ideas.

The Rogers family isn’t the only one who sees the Waldron’s classes as beneficial.

Art classes after school give children downtime to be creative and process what’s happening in their lives, said Mary Krupinski.

Her daughter, Alexi Cornett, is a student in the drawing and painting class.

Krupinski said the arts program has provided more exposure to the arts, which teaches kids how to look at things in a new way.

“I think we’re finding that if you have the ability to be a more divergent thinker, that that is really where some of the biggest opportunities in the world can come from,” she said.

Teaching valuable lessons

Hilary Cannon Anderson, the drawing and painting class teacher, said the program is for students who choose to be there, even if they are at different levels.

And she agrees with Krupinski about the benefits of arts education.

“Looking at a problem and being able to solve it in different ways, the same problem but in different ways, being able to look at something and think outside the box, these are skills you need no matter what career you go into,” Anderson said.

She’s been teaching art, in public schools or in private lessons, for years, and has been an artist since she was a child.

Anderson has been teaching in the Ivy Arts for Kids program since last fall.

Alexi Cornett, 11, said she likes after-school courses at the Waldron because they are focused on one medium.

She and her friend, Eliana Silberstein, also 11, enjoy the Waldron classes.

“It’s just something fun and interesting to do,” Eliana said. “And I really like art and I’m always looking for ways to get better.”

Graham doesn’t see the programs trying to fill any gap in arts education. The program attempts to enhance what a child may — or may not — already have. And, the classes aren’t aligned with state standards.

In the classrooms

The noncredit daytime students are mostly age 50 and older, either in retirement or with schedules that allow them to come during the workday, Graham said.

Across the board, the more popular classes are drawing and photography, she added.

The more unusual classes are limestone carving, homesteading, teaching people to live off the land with visits to farms, and de-antiquing, or de-cluttering life by processing items of value and the emotional ties people might experience.

All of these classes Graham hopes to continue.

Although the program’s future is flexible, there are some certainties.

“We will always strive, for whatever we do, to be meaningful, to matter to people, to bring value to what they do,“ Graham said.


On the Web

Visit Ivy Tech Community College’s Center for Lifelong Learning online at www.ivytech.edu/cll. Reach the center at 812-330-6041.

The Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center is at 122 S. Walnut St. in downtown Bloomington.


Jenna Smith works on her drawing at a class in the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center in Bloomington. Enrollment in Center for Lifelong Learning classes is booming. Chris Howell | Herald-Times


Instructor Hilary Cannon Anderson helps Jenna Smith, left, with her drawing at a class at the Waldron. At right is Nancy Porter. Chris Howell | Herald-Times


Instructor Marcy Neiditz, left, demonstrates how to prepare clay to her students, Zoe Denommee, left, Ben Rogers, center, Ethan Smith, background, and Emil Wiley Lippke. Chris Howell | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Ivy Tech arts workshops to be held in Orange County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 5, 2012

Ivy Tech arts workshops to be held in Orange County

Registration is open for Ivy Tech arts workshops in Orange County. Sign up today! Single-session art workshops run Thursday evenings, 6-8pm at the Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley, located at 479 S. Larry Bird Blvd. in French Lick, Ind. All supplies are included in the course fee.

Metal Art with Rosemary Chamberlain runs October 25. Practice the art of hammering and shaping metal to create your own earrings. Cost $69.

Needle Felt Art with Xoch Owen runs November 1. Discover the art of needle felting and create your own one-of-a-kind pendant. Cost $59.

Lapidary Art Jewelry with Janis Hinshaw runs Nov. 8. Learn the art of lapidary from the Hinshaw family and create your own personal bracelet and earrings. Cost $65.

A full list of Ivy Tech classes offered at Orange County Learning Center can be found at www.ivytech.edu/orangecounty. Register at (812) 330-6041 or online at www.ivytech.edu/cll.

About the Orange County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, in collaboration with regional funding partners, opened the Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley in January 2012 to provide higher education and short-term training opportunities in Orange County. The center allows students to earn credits toward an Ivy Tech Associate degree by taking classes close to home. Since opening, the learning center has expanded academic course offerings, non-credit short-term training, and personal enrichment options.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech-Bloomington culinary arts program earns full accreditation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 4, 2012

Ivy Tech-Bloomington culinary arts program earns full accreditation

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington announced today that its Associate of Applied Science degree in Hospitality Administration: Culinary Arts Concentration has earned full accreditation for three years by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation (ACFEF).

“This accreditation confirms the program is meeting outcomes set by a national standard,” said Jeffery Taber, Ivy Tech-Bloomington Hospitality Program Chair. “With this, students will now have the opportunity to graduate from the culinary concentration with the first level industry certification, Certified Culinarian©, in addition to the Associate of Applied Science degree in Hospitality Administration.”

Earlier this year, Ivy Tech-Bloomington also announced the addition of a Hospitality Administration: Baking and Pastry Concentration.

“As a baker and former bakery owner, I am excited that we offer this concentration,” Taber said. “The job market for baking and pastry graduates goes beyond the small independent bakery.”

Ivy Tech Community College’s Hospitality Administration degree program offers certification and degree options in Culinary Arts, Culinology, Baking and Pastry Arts, and Hospitality Management with areas of emphasis in Restaurant Management, Hotel Management, and Event Management.

Graduates from the Hospitality Administration degree program can start careers as cooks, chefs, bakers, convention center managers, event planners, food service managers, lodging and restaurant managers, or transfer their degrees to a four-year college or university.

For information about Ivy Tech degree program offerings, visit www.ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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John Cameron wins inaugural Ivy Tech award

The Herald-Times

John Cameron wins inaugural Ivy Tech award

By Mike Leonard331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
October 4, 2012

John Cameron was awarded Ivy Tech’s inaugural “Excellence in Entrepreneurship Award” by the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship in a private recognition event Tuesday.

“The Cook Center established the Excellence in Entrepreneurship Award to draw attention to individuals in our communities who are leaders, job creators and entrepreneurs in their field,” Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart said in a prepared statement. “Dr. Cameron has a long and distinguished career in nuclear physics, medical technology and research and development administration, and is among the pioneers in proton therapy.”

Cameron served as professor of physics and director of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility and has directed major multidisciplinary research and development institutes for the past 20 years.

According to an Ivy Tech news release, the Entrepreneurship Award was awarded specifically in recognition of his leadership in the foundation of ProCure Treatment Centers, his pivotal role in the development of the then Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (now the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center), and of the ProCure Training and Development Center, established in Bloomington in 2008. ProCure TDC was the first facility in the world dedicated to proton therapy training.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington and ProCure Treatment Centers Inc. formed a partnership in 2008 to provide students access to state-of-the-art radiation therapy simulation lab equipment and expert industry training at the ProCure Training and Development Center. The partnership has enabled Ivy Tech-Bloomington to develop and offer a Proton Therapy Specialist certificate program, the first and only of its kind in the nation. To date, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has graduated 41 registered radiation therapists and 63 proton-certified students.

John Cameron, Ph.D.
Founder, President, and Chairman
ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

Vera Bradley co-founder: Never underestimate what you can do

The Herald-Times

Vera Bradley co-founder: Never underestimate what you can do

By Bob Zaltsberg331-4364 | rzaltsberg@heraldt.com
October 4, 2012

On a February day in 1982, Patricia Miller and her friend, Barbara Baekgaard, were walking through the Atlanta airport to catch their connecting flight back to Fort Wayne after a trip to Florida.

“We noticed all these guys with their carry-on luggage,” she said Wednesday. Then they noticed many women, too, had carry-ons that looked exactly like those carried by the men. Miller, the keynote speaker at the third annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship, said at that point the friends’ entrepreneurial instincts kicked in.

“We decided women needed pretty carry-on luggage,” Miller said.

The next Monday they pooled $250 each, bought some colorful fabric and went to work cutting the fabric on a basement ping pong table in order to make some small bags they thought would be popular with women.

That was the beginning of their second business. Their first was a wallpapering company named Up Your Wall. This one was named for Baekgaard’s mother: Vera Bradley.

Now, Vera Bradley, the Fort Wayne-based company, designs an internationally recognized brand of colorful handbags, duffel bags and other accessories for women. The company operates 70 stores in the United States and just opened three in Japan as a trial. It also sells the brand through 3,300 business partners, and operates the Vera Bradley Foundation which has pledged $20 million to fight breast cancer in honor of the company’s first sales rep and Baekgaard’s college roommate, Mary Sloan.

On Wednesday, Miller mainly told the story of her company, while sprinkling in advice for the entrepreneurs and others in attendance.

She said a lot of people will say “entrepreneurs are born,” but she believes you can learn about entrepreneurship and ways to spot an idea, take a risk and attract people to believe in you. She said “it’s the people you meet along the way who will make a big difference.”

One of those people was the second banker she and Baekgaard asked to help them. They had met the first one about five minutes earlier when he agreed to loan them $2,000 to help them with their new business.

“I remember my hand shaking when I signed that note,” Miller said. She also recalls after leaving the bank thinking that the banker had been uninterested and unengaged in making the loan.

“We went back to the same bank and asked for a different banker,” she said. This one was interested, enthusiastic and helpful. Thus started a long business relationship between an individual Fort Wayne banker and a company that now does more than $400 million a year in sales.

She said people should never underestimate how far they might go — in business or otherwise.

“The question I’m asked the most,” she said, “is ‘Did you ever think you would start a public company with over $400 million in annual sales?’”

Her answer is no, with a “but.”

“I say no, but none of us ever put a ceiling on anything,” she said. “It’s like bringing a baby home from the hospital. When he’s 16 years old and 6-foot-5, did you ever think that would happen?”

She encouraged entrepreneurs to take things “one step at a time, and try to learn something new every single day.”

Many “did-you-ever-think?” moments are now part of her personal and and professional story.

She never thought she’d be Indiana’s first Secretary of Commerce, which she was under Gov. Mitch Daniels.

She never thought her company would have a float in the Rose Bowl Parade, which it did in 2009. She never thought her company would go public, which it did in 2010.

The company employs 2,200, and about 1,000 workers are in Indiana, most of them in five buildings in Fort Wayne. But some manufacturing has moved to China.

She still believes Vera Bradley holds to the personal culture that she and her partner launched when they chose Baekgaard’s mother’s name for their company 30 years ago.

“My mother’s name was Wilma Polita. That wasn’t a hard decision,” she said.


About the institute

The third annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship is an outgrowth of the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship, which was established in 2012. The center’s mission is to develop and institute practical tools for students, individuals and the community to foster entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington and in the broader economic development region the college serves.


Patricia Miller

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2012

 

Ivy Tech presents Excellence in Entrepreneurship Award to John Cameron, Ph.D.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 3, 2012

Ivy Tech presents Excellence in Entrepreneurship Award to John Cameron, Ph.D.

John Cameron, Ph.D.
Founder, President, and Chairman
ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus awarded John Cameron, Ph.D. with the inaugural “Excellence in Entrepreneurship Award” on Tuesday evening, October 2. The award was presented by the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at a private recognition event.

“The Cook Center established the Excellence in Entrepreneurship Award to draw attention to individuals in our communities who are leaders, job creators, and entrepreneurs in their field,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart. “Dr. Cameron has a long and distinguished career in nuclear physics, medical technology, and research and development administration, and is among the pioneers in proton therapy.”

Dr. Cameron, a particle therapy physics pioneer, was awarded specifically in recognition of his leadership in the foundation of ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc. in 2005, his pivotal role in the development of the then Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, now the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, and of the ProCure Training and Development Center (TDC), established in Bloomington in 2008. ProCure TDC was the first facility in the world dedicated to proton therapy training.

Dr. Cameron served as professor of physics and director of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility and has directed major multidisciplinary research and development institutes for the past 20 years. He has received nearly $250 million in grants and contracts and served on numerous advisory and review boards for the United States and foreign research agencies.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington and ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc. formed a partnership in 2008 to provide students access to state-of-the-art radiation therapy simulation lab equipment and expert industry training at the ProCure Training and Development Center. Additionally, the partnership has enabled Ivy Tech-Bloomington to develop and offer a Proton Therapy Specialist certificate program, the first and only of its kind in the nation. To date, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has graduated 41 registered radiation therapists and 63 proton-certified students. The college receives proton certification inquiries from around the world.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s radiation therapy degree program is the only accredited two-year
program in the state. It is accredited by The Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 N. Wacker Dr., Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 704-5300.

For more information about Ivy Tech’s Radiation Therapy degree program, contact (812) 330-6013 or www.ivytech.edu/radiation-therapy.

For more information about the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, contact (812) 330- 6261 or www.ivytech.edu/entrepreneurship.

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was established in 2010 to develop and implement practical tools and resources for students, individuals, and the community to foster entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Bloomington and in the broader economic development region it serves.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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