Preschool class is getting an artful advantage

The Herald-Times

Preschool class is getting an artful advantage

Our opinion
January 30, 2013

It’s good to see the latest collaboration between Fairview Elementary School and institutions of higher learning reaching all the way to the youngest students.

As detailed by reporter April Toler in Tuesday’s In School feature, Ivy Tech Community College is partnering with Fairview to introduce artful learning concepts to the school’s preschool instruction, beginning next fall. Arts instructors will work with Fairview students and assist Fairview teachers in expanding their use of artful learning strategies in the classroom.

Fairview has been using the project-based learning model developed by the Leonard Bernstein Center for two years, but this will expand the program to preschool. With research placing more emphasis on early childhood development, this is another way to prepare kids to achieve in school by introducing them to learning methods they need to master as they go forward.

Bloomington is lucky to have two institutions of higher learning willing to involve themselves with the community’s schools. The Indiana University Jacobs Schools of Music, for example, has collaborated with Fairview for several years in the String Project, which provides violin instruction for students. Ivy Tech also has worked with the school on other arts-related projects.

Of course, while we’re handing out plaudits, we should recognize the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, without whose support in the way of grants, this latest collaboration would not happen.

ArtfulLearning3
Preschooler Patrick England, left, helps Abi Oakley during an exercise to learn the sounds and appearance of letters Monday at Fairview Elementary School. Soon artful learning will be applied to some of their lessons, just as it is for older Fairview students. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Local groups partnering to support entrepreneurship

The Herald-Times

Local groups partnering to support entrepreneurship

Effort designed to help new businesses ‘connect the dots’ on services, advice, programs

By Bill Strother
331-4265 | bstrother@heraldt.com
January 30, 2013

The city of Bloomington, the local economic development corporation and Ivy Tech’s Center for Entrepreneurship will be working with other groups over the next several months to design an “ecosystem” to help new businesses and entrepreneurs “connect the dots” on services, advice and programs to help them succeed.

Work on the plan was announced in a news release this week. The group’s first meeting is scheduled for Wednesday morning in the Johnson Creamery building downtown.

The effort is being financed by a portion of a $35,000 grant from the Monroe County Community Foundation to the entrepreneurship center. A number of other agencies, ranging from United Way to the Bloomington Enterprise Association to Indiana University to the chamber of commerce to county government, are participating.

The plan is to identify those resources that are available to small-business people just starting out or who need guidance on such issues as managing growth, marketing, financing and other key elements of business development, then devising a coherent and connected system to point people toward the help they need, said Steve Bryant, director of the Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship.

Another goal is to create a network that also works for provider agencies to better muster resources and quickly identify and match needs to providers.

Wednesday’s initial meeting will rough out the study plan and outline goals, with regularly scheduled meetings and roundtables that will explore what is available, identify best practices and any redundancies and investigate similar efforts in other cities.

Bryant said most of the study budget likely will go to pay for reports and research and to bring in consultants, and perhaps send small expeditions to explore efforts in cities such as Ann Arbor or Cleveland, two cities that Bryant said have systems that are relevant to Bloomington.

“What we want is it to be agreed upon that ‘here’s the structure and system for serving entrepreneurs,’” said development corporation president Ron Walker. “We’ll know where we fit into the picture and how best to move people through.”

Danise Alano-Martin, the city’s economic development director, said the goal is to provide a framework for collaboration that is as seamless as possible and that works not only for client businesses but also is sustainable for the providers who are involved.

“I’m really looking forward to it,” she said. “It’s a great opportunity for all of us who have the same big picture goal to figure out the details on how we get there in a way that makes sense for us and for the ones making the big decision and starting a business.”

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf

Indiana Public Media Arts & Music

Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf

By George Walker

Posted January 24, 2013

“George and Martha do love each other, but they are kind of crippled in their communication.”

Woolf

Photo: Ivy Tech
Bill Simmons as George and Diane Kondrat as Martha in a tense moment.

Event Information

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf
Play by Edward Albee
Rose Firebay of the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center
January 25 – February 9, 2013
323-3020
_____________________

Ivy Tech Community College presents Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. It’s  a farewell celebration for Bloomington actor Diane Kondrat. Performances in the intimate Rose Firebay run January 25-February 9.

Kondrat plays Martha with frequent acting partner Bill Simmons as her husband George. Emily Mange and Mathew Rowlands play Honey and Nick. They’re the young couple who unwittingly fall into George and Martha’s ongoing battle.

Although many will recall Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf as a dark and scary experience, Kondrat is wary of a simple approach.” It’s so tempting for actors to see a piece like this that is so familiar and to let themselves be imitative or derivative from a film or the very dark readings that can occur in a high school honors class,” she says.”Our director Patricia McKee keeps comparing it to Noel Coward’s comedy Hay Fever. She’s insisting on kind of a light touch and wants people to think that at least at the beginning, they’re seeing a romantic comedy.”

Kondrat does admit that, “There are some brutal moments in the play, but we’re daring ourselves to make this Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf more like badminton match than a squash game. “

The community farewell to actor Diane Kondrat sponsored by Ivy Tech Community College is produced by the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center’s Artistic Director, Paul Daily.

In addition to producing the production Daily has arranged for Kondrat to meet with Ivy Tech students in sessions on monologues and scene work.

________________________________________________

Walker
George Walker, born in Winchester, Virginia, came to Bloomington in 1966 for graduate school in Indiana University’s English Department, and began announcing for WFIU in 1967. Currently an On-Air Programming Director, George interviews artists in a wide variety of areas, reviews plays and operas, and supervises on-air performances. In his time away from WFIU, George enjoys reading, exercising, and playing guitar in his local bluegrass band.

Fairview Elementary to expand artful learning to preschoolers

The Herald-Times

Fairview Elementary to expand artful learning to preschoolers

Ivy Tech Community College partners with school to provide arts instructors

By April Toler
331-4353 | atoler@heraldt.com
January 29, 2013

It has been more than two years since Fairview Elementary School began introducing artful learning, a project-based model developed by the Leonard Bernstein Center, into its curriculum.

The school will soon expand artful learning to its preschool class because of a growing relationship with Ivy Tech Community College.

One visual arts instructor and one theater arts instructor from Ivy Tech will work with the students on a weekly basis.

“I am thrilled and honored to have this support from Ivy Tech to develop the arts in our preschool class,” said principal Karen Adams via email. “In addition to enhancing the arts in preschool, this project aligns perfectly with our Artful Learning Model.”

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was recently awarded two grants from the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, one of which provides more than $11,000 to start the “Preschool Arts Infusion Program” at Fairview.

Jeffery Allen, assistant director for the Center for Lifelong Learning Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, said the idea behind the program is to bring “high quality arts” directly to the school’s lesson plan through a collaboration between a certified teacher and the artist.

“An example might be creating an original fairy tale (creative play) to explore word recognition and cooperation skills, or a painting reflecting a scientific concept, like change of the seasons,” Allen said. “The key is working together, bringing two unique and complementary skill sets to the students to increase learning.”

This school year was the first year Lynne Hall, Title 1 preschool teacher at Fairview, worked on an artful learning unit in the classroom.

By collaborating with Ivy Tech, Hall said, she hopes to expand her knowledge of artful learning strategies and provide opportunities that would not be available without Ivy Tech’s support.

“It’s going to expose (my students) to things I might not have been able to expose them to on my own,” she said. “They are going to be learning our curriculum and our standards through a different way to meet all different kinds of learners.”

The Preschool Arts Infusion Program is not the first collaboration between Ivy Tech and Fairview.

Each year, Fairview students create the college’s holiday card, which is sent to thousands of community members. And this year, Fairview kindergarten and sixth-grade students collaborated with the college for a ceramics project that will be installed on the B-Line Trail this spring.

For Allen, the collaboration has been a give-and-take relationship aimed at providing the best experience possible for students.

“Bringing the parties together to create that has been an absolute pleasure,” Allen said. “Again, the hallmark being it’s not Ivy Tech coming in saying, ‘Here’s a product we’re selling,’ but rather, ‘Here are some skills we have, here are the skills you have — let’s marry these skills and come up with something that’s unique and powerful.’ I think we really have.”

ArtfulLearning3
Preschooler Patrick England, left, helps Abi Oakley during an exercise to learn the sounds and appearance of letters Monday at Fairview Elementary School. Soon artful learning will be applied to some of their lessons, just as it is for older Fairview students. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

ArtfulLearning
Preschooler Patrick England, left, yells “bingo” Monday while Abi Oakley watches at Fairview Elementary School during an exercise that helps students learn the names of letters and how they sound. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

ArtfulLearning2
Lynne Hall works with preschoolers on letter identification by sound and sight Monday at Fairview Elementary School. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Bloomington to Create Entrepreneurship Action Plan

InsideIndiana

Updated: 1/29/2013 7:29:13 AM

Bloomington to Create Entrepreneurship Action Plan

InsideINdianaBusiness.com Report

The city of Bloomington has formed a partnership designed to link entrepreneurs and small businesses to service-providing organizations. The Bloomington Economic Development Corp. and the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington are also involved in the effort.

Funding for the initiative has come in part from a recent Community Impact Funding Grant from the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County.

January 28, 2013

News Release

Bloomington, Ind. — The City of Bloomington, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation (BEDC), and the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, have launched a joint effort to develop an entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem action plan for Bloomington and Monroe County.

The effort will convene leaders of several local organizations that provide services to startups and small businesses to review current programs and services, identify possible new programs and services based on best practices in other communities, and develop recommendations for the community.

“Entrepreneurship is not new to Bloomington,” said Mayor Mark Kruzan. “But entrepreneurs have new ideas every day that, in the right environment and with the right help, will be transformed into new businesses and new jobs. As a community, we have to make sure we’re providing the right support at the right time.”

The goal is to provide clear, coordinated pathways for entrepreneurs and small businesses as well as for those organizations that provide services to them.

“We’re calling this team together to develop an ecosystem that is easy to navigate from a startup standpoint and sustainable to support from a service-provider standpoint,” said Ron Walker, President of the BEDC.

As one of the service providers in the community, the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship was established at Ivy Tech Bloomington in 2010 to provide students, individuals and small businesses with a means to gain and develop the practical application of entrepreneurial skills and ideas.

Chancellor John Whikehart said this joint effort with the City and BEDC helps to further that mission and ensure that the Bloomington and Monroe County community provides a continuum of service to entrepreneurs as their businesses develop.

“Entrepreneurs take great personal risks which can return immense community rewards in terms of jobs and economic vitality,” Whikehart noted. “A community that is successful in helping entrepreneurs make sure those risks are calculated risks – by providing education, technical expertise, mentorship, financial capital and so on – will reap long-term economic benefits that are driven by home-grown innovation.”

The group will create an asset map of existing entrepreneurship and innovation programs, benchmark other communities that have programs and services to support the innovation economy, detail gaps that exist locally and regionally and gather best practices ideas from local entrepreneurial thought leaders. The group will release a final report and recommendations in the spring, and will continue to work together toward implementing those recommendations.

Funding for the initiative has come in part from a recent Community Impact Funding Grant from the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County. Multiple local organizations will be included in the project.

About City of Bloomington Department of Economic & Sustainable Development

The mission of the Department is to foster a livable and economically resilient community through partnerships, collaboration and outreach, and through strategic initiatives which expand economic opportunities, preserve the health of our environment, provide for social equity to the citizenry, and advance the principles of sustainable development.

About Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was established in 2010 to develop and implement practical tools and resources for students, individuals and the community to foster entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Bloomington and in the broader economic development region it serves.

About BEDC

The BEDC is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the retention, development and attraction of quality jobs in Monroe County. The BEDC is led by a partnership of private industry leaders, the City of Bloomington, Monroe County, Indiana University and Ivy Tech Community College–Bloomington. For more information click here www.comparebloomington.us

Source: Bloomington Economic Development Corp.

THEATER REVIEW: Fighting games: Ivy Tech presents ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’

The Herald-Times

‘WHO’S’ AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?’

THEATER REVIEW: Fighting games: Ivy Tech presents ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’

By Doris Lynch
H-T Reviewer | dlynch@heraldt.com
January 28, 2013

Credit director Patricia McKee with keeping an excellent quartet of actors sparring, feinting, avoiding and coming back for more in Edward Albee’s scintillating comedic drama about marriage, and the strategies couples use to stay married.

In her swansong Bloomington performance, Diane Kondrat gives a loud, “braying,” in-your-face portrayal of Martha, a faculty wife in Edward Albee’s play about an early a.m. party, where two couples are getting to know each other at a small New England college. As the college president’s daughter, Kondrat keeps her rage simmering to boiling all night as she denigrates — no, eviscerates — her husband for his failures as an academic. Matching her one for one — sometimes in Latin — is Bill Simmons as her bogged-down, history professor husband, George.

It’s 1962. Most women don’t work outside the home, and this couple has issues. In some of the most vituperative and witty language to ever flame onstage, Albee examines the nature of love, professional success and long coupledom — what we give our spouses, and more importantly, what we inflict upon them.

Pacing, punchy, using Jeff Grafton’s ’60s living-room set like a boxing ring, Martha tears George apart, cell by cell, in front of her guests, a young faculty couple new to town, Nick, the biology professor (Matthew Roland) and his wife, Honey (Emily Mange).

Cocky and smart, Roland’s Nick earned his MA by age 19. At first, he’s mildly amused by the mind games his hosts present, but soon realizes the potential for serious fallout to his own career that they might cause.

Mange, an IU senior, brings a lovely ingenue quality to her role of a wife who can’t handle her brandy. Her comic timing is excellent, and she shows you the stirrings of a young woman, under her husband’s thumb, who is just learning to speak for herself.

“Woolf” depicts a series of changing alliances. First it’s Martha against George, then George slyly attacking Nick when the women go to the powder room, then Martha pokes fun at Honey before flirting outrageously with Nick.

As the three acts progress, you can see in the actors’ faces the weariness and psychological wounding that they have inflicted upon each other all evening. At one point, Nick collapses to the floor and covers his ears, as Martha and George begin yet another bruising attack against each other.

That’s not to say that this play is not riotously funny, especially the first act, where the insults elicit not only laughs but also shocked surprise.

The mirroring of couples — the older and jaded Martha and George with the young newbies, Nick and Honey — makes one wonder how the new marriage will progress. Will they also learn to love by scarring each other?

With more personal and biting attacks — some true, some fictional — Martha and George keep raising the stakes but also dart back into fiercely protecting each other against Nick. At one point, George turns away from the drama to read in a chair, and it’s fun to watch Kondrat hustle over and fruitlessly demand his attention.

In the third act — significantly during a moment of solitude — Kondrat reveals a vulnerable Martha. All night, Martha has fought fiercely while remaining emotionally inviolate, but here her voice breaks and she speaks quietly. Also, in the third act, Bill Simmons shows a protective caring that George’s elevated language has hidden earlier. Both performances showed much range and depth.

Ambrose Bierce called love “a temporary insanity curable by marriage.” The marriages dissected here are crass, broken and breaking, yet especially in Martha and George’s, you discover a surprising resiliency that you know will last.

For an intense evening of high-octane theater, don’t miss this show.


If you go

WHO: Ivy Tech Community Student Productions

WHAT: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Feb. 6-9

WHERE: Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center’s Rose Firebay, 122 S. Walnut St., Bloomington

TICKETS: $15-$25. Available at the Buskirk-Chumley box office, 114 E. Kirkwood Ave., 812-323-3020 or www.bctboxoffice.com

WEBSITE: www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/waldron/performance/student.html

WARNING: Contains adult content, strong language.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

The first step is research

The Herald-Times

It’s Your Business

The first step is research

By Steve Bryant
A Bloomington voice
January 25, 2013

People come to the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington daily to start a new business. Most are at the idea stage and have not done the research necessary to truly get things moving forward in the near term. The interest is there, but there needs to be more questions asked and answered in order to prepare for the successful start of a new business.

One of the questions we often get is where can I find market research about the field I am entering? According to Wikipedia, market research is generally best described as any organized effort to find information about markets or customers. It can also help you define your competition in the market.

Peter Drucker, a famous management author, believes that “market research is for discovering what people want, need or believe. It can also help you discover how they act. Once that research is completed, it can help you determine how to market your product.”

We are just beginning a new year, and perhaps you’ve made a decision to plan for a new business in 2013. Performing market research should be one of the first things you do as you begin to strategize before going into business. It is an essential part of any business plan and probably the most important part of understanding what people think about what you will be selling. There are companies all over the Internet that perform market research for a living and write detailed reports on many industries. The challenge is, this is often expensive. If you are a startup with limited cash on hand to purchase, you may not be able to afford this expertise.

We recommend doing some very simple market research functions. First, Google everything you can about a particular market or industry. You may be able to find some interesting statistics, business plans or research reports for free. Second, I like the direct approach, so search out people already in the industry or business you want to develop. Ask anyone you can about the product or service. Would you buy this product, what would you pay, or how would you use it? This is particularly important if this is a new product or service. I know several people in the business of developing mobile apps for your smartphone, and this is what they do constantly. Look for user feedback and ideas to help refine the product.

If you are looking to sell a consumer product, go to the store where competitor products are sold and see what the price is, what type of packaging they come in, where the product placed in the store. All this information will be critical to helping you decide if this is the right product in the right place at the right time. Look for markets that are not oversaturated with competition. Are there only two or three competitors or are there hundreds? If you want demographic information, www.stats.indiana.edu can provide a wealth of information on population, household income, gender, ethnicity and other useful statistics to help guide you in your research through its searchable tools and databases.

So, BEFORE you launch a new business, check out some of these free tools. Hopefully these are a few simple tips to help you get organized and informed. Good luck and get out there and “do it.”

Steve Bryant is executive director of the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Bloomington. Next week, Bloomington’s Danise Alano-Martin will share her views.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Brokaw to be speaker at Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute

The Herald-Times

Brokaw to be speaker at Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
January 20, 2013

Broadcast journalist and author Tom Brokaw will be the featured speaker at Ivy Tech Bloomington’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service program this spring.

Brokaw spent his entire journalism career with NBC news, beginning as a reporter in 1966 and continuing through his work as the network’s White House reporter, co-host of “The Today Show,” anchor of the NBC Nightly News and host of the venerable news talk show, “Meet the Press.”

Brokaw will speak at the institute’s fundraising dinner April 11 at the Bloomington Monroe County Convention Center.

“I think he’s one of the big names in the history of television news,” said Mike Conway, a journalism professor at Indiana University and authority on the history of broadcast news. “He was the face of the network for a long stretch of time and he still is called in when big things happen. He’s kind of become the statesman of television anchors.”

The veteran broadcaster also is well-known for his bestselling 1998 book, “The Greatest Generation,” which extols the virtues of the men and women who weathered the Great Depression, fought and sacrificed for the United States in World War II and returned home to build the country into a political, economic and military superpower.

“We’re actually building on that book to create the theme for our O’Bannon Institute this year,” said John Whikehart, chancellor of Ivy Tech Bloomington. “Our theme is Building the Next Great Generation and we’re going to be discussing where the next generation is coming from and what are the challenges the next generation is going to face.”

This will mark the 10th year of the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, a three-day event that will run April 10-12 and include a civic engagement awards ceremony, volunteer service projects in the community, panel discussions and a final closing conversation.

Previous speakers for the O’Bannon Institute fundraising dinner have included columnist George Will, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, political strategists James Carville and Mary Matalin, former First Lady Laura Bush and former Sen. Alan Simpson.

“People often ask me how I decide who I will invite,” Whikehart said. “I always say the same thing: it’s someone I’d like to meet.”

Tickets for the fundraising dinner featuring Brokaw are available through Tina Phelps at 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu.

Details about this year’s O’Bannon Institute will be posted, when available, at http://obannon.ivytech.edu.

TB
Tom Brokaw

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Ivy Tech seeing spike in international enrollment

The Herald-Times

Ivy Tech seeing spike in international enrollment

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
January 19, 2013

Indiana University has long had a reputation for international engagement and as a destination for international students. But on the west side of Bloomington, Ivy Tech Community College is showing surprising international numbers as well.

Thirty-three new international students enrolled for the spring, 2013 semester, bringing the total for the Bloomington campus to 84 international students from 21 different countries.

There are various reasons for the surge, including increased cooperation and collaboration with IU. There has been some movement of international undergraduate students between the two institutions, said David Zaret, vice president for international affairs at IU. “To date,” he said, “this has been a nice, mutually beneficial arrangement.”

But only 20 percent of the Ivy Tech international students have moved over from IU after learning about Ivy Tech through IU’s intensive English program. “The rest of them are applying directly to us from their country of origin. We work with them with what they need to do but when we talk to them, we find out that generally, they’re coming here through word of mouth recommendations — other students they know or siblings. They’re telling them there is another option in Bloomington and that’s Ivy Tech,” Bloomington chancellor John Whikehart said this week.

“Some of them are degree-seeking students and some of them are telling us their eventual goal is to transfer to IU,” he said. “And then some are interested in our unique degree program in biotechnology or our radiation therapy program. We have one student from Brazil who’s here because we now have an associate’s in fine arts degree.”

And then there is cost. Ivy Tech charges $111.50 per credit hour for resident students and $239.40 for nonresidents. IU charges $273.40 per credit hour for residents and $943.75 for nonresidents.

The Ivy Tech Bloomington campus already stands out in the comprehensive community college system that includes 14 regions and programs in 75 Hoosier communities. Last fall, the Bloomington campus saw students enrolled from 72 of Indiana’s 92 counties — a dramatic number considering that the 14 regions and 75 communities with programs are is designed to give students a higher education option close to home.

“I think because of our relationship with IU, we’ve become a magnet campus within our own system,” Whikehart said. “We have students from communities where there is an Ivy Tech location who choose to come here because their goal is go to IU Bloomington eventually.”

The Ivy Tech Community College system continues to grow, with nearly 120,000 students enrolled for spring semester, reflecting a four percent increase over last year. The Bloomington enrollment numbers, after years of dramatic growth, now is holding steady, with 6,187 students enrolled for the current semester. That’s a couple hundred fewer than fall semester, consistent with the trend IU sees with slightly lower enrollment figures for spring than fall.

Whikehart said one reason Ivy Tech is seeing more international students is the result of a simple change in college policy. “The college realized that we were only accepting one English language proficiency test, the TOEFL (Test Of English as a Foreign Language), when other institutions such as IU may have as many as six tests they accept for English language proficiency. Any student who hadn’t taken the TOEFL in their home country would have to spend as much as $700-$800 to take it here, so by not opening up to some of these other perfectly good tests we were pricing ourselves out of the international student market,” he said.

The value of international students goes far beyond simple enrollment numbers, the Ivy Tech chancellor said. “Our student body is very heavily Indiana students, whether they come from our region or the other regions in the state,” Whikehart said. “We all know that we’re moving into a much more global economy and as our students go out into the world, it benefits them to have interacted with and gotten to know students from other countries.

“And we tell our international students, this is a learning environment. They need to be our teachers. We can learn from them, about their culture and their nations and their backgrounds,” he said.

sept-8-2011-enrollment2
Ivy Tech campus in Bloomington. H-T file photo

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Tom Brokaw to headline Ivy Tech’s 10th annual O’Bannon Institute in April

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 22, 2013

Tom Brokaw to headline Ivy Tech’s 10th annual O’Bannon Institute in April

Broadcast journalist and author, best known as the anchor and managing editor of NBC Nightly News, Tom Brokaw, will headline Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington’s 10th annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service. Brokaw headlines the Institute’s fundraising dinner on Thursday, April 11 at the Bloomington Monroe County Convention Center, with proceeds benefiting the Ivy Tech Center for Civic Engagement.

This year’s Institute theme is Building the Next Great Generation and the three-day event will be held April 10-12.

“Ivy Tech-Bloomington is excited to host our annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, both because Tom Brokaw is with us, and because it’s our 10th annual event,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “It’s a special event this year, bringing focus to Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s 10 years of dedication to our civic engagement goal.”

Brokaw has spent his entire distinguished journalism career with NBC News, beginning in 1966 in the Los Angeles bureau where he covered Ronald Reagan’s first run for public office, the rise of the Sixties counter culture, the assassination of Bobby Kennedy, and the 1968 Presidential campaign. From L.A., he went to Washington to work as White House correspondent during Watergate. Next up was New York where he was appointed anchor and managing editor of NBC Nightly News. Brokaw took over Meet the Press for the 2008 Presidential campaign when close friend and colleague Tim Russert died.

Brokaw has won every major award in his craft, including Peabody, Duponts, Emmys, and lifetime achievement recognition. He has an impressive list of firsts, including first interview with Mikhail Gorbachev, the first network report on human rights abuses in Tibet accompanied by an exclusive interview with the Dali Lama, and the only American network anchor to report from Berlin the night the Berlin Wall came down. In 1998, Brokaw published his first book, The Greatest Generation, one of the most popular non-fiction books of the 20th century. His most recent book, The Time of Our Lives, was published in 2012.

The O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, launched 10 years ago by Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus, is an annual opportunity for the community to come together to discuss topics related to nonprofits, education, and political and civic service. Previous speakers at the Institute include former U.S Senators, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, governors, political advisers and columnists, a presidential candidate, and former First Lady of the United States Laura W. Bush.

The event has grown from a one-day inaugural event, to the now three-day event. It includes a civic engagement awards ceremony, volunteer service projects in the community, a fundraising dinner, panel discussions, and a final closing conversation.

For tickets to the fundraising dinner with Tom Brokaw, contact Tina Phelps, Assistant to the Chancellor, at (812) 330-6001 or tphelps@ivytech.edu.

Further details about the 10th annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service will be posted online as they become available at http://obannon.ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Local King Day-related events include talks by Little Rock Nine member, filmmaker

The Herald Times

Local King Day-related events include talks by Little Rock Nine member, filmmaker

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
January 15, 2013

A member of the Little Rock Nine and a pioneering African-American filmmaker will be keynote speakers in a diverse program of activities scheduled to celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. this month.

The city of Bloomington will present Carlotta LaNier as the featured speaker at its King Day program on the civil rights leader’s birthday at 7 p.m. Monday at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater.

LaNier and eight other black students enrolled at Little Rock Central High School in 1957 and initially were denied admission by Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus. After President Dwight Eisenhower ordered the National Guard to intervene, the students were admitted, but taunted and harassed, as captured in iconic photographs shot by the late Indiana University professor Will Counts.

The desegregation of the school is considered one of the most important events in the civil rights movement. LaNier describes her experience in her recent book, “A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High.” LaNier is the president of the Little Rock Nine Foundation, a scholarship organization dedicated to ensuring equal access to education for blacks.

A 6 p.m. reception will precede the program at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. During the program, remarks will be given by Mayor Mark Kruzan, IU Bloomington Provost Lauren Robel, King Commission Chairman William A. Vance Jr., and others. Musical performers will include the IU African American Choral Ensemble, directed by Raymond Wise, and the University Elementary School Martin Luther King Jr. Choir, directed by Sarah Maggie Olivo.

A complete listing of Martin Luther King Day of Service activities is available at www.bloomington.in.gov/mlk.

IU events

While IU is a partner in Monday’s Buskirk-Chumley program, the university will feature filmmaker, editor and producer Madeline Anderson Friday at a new event, the MLK Day Film Festival.

Anderson was one of the first black documentary makers and the director of “Integration Report (1960), “I Am Somebody” (1969) and “A Tribute to Malcolm X” (1969).

“We have a lot of her work here in our holdings either at the Black Film Archive or at IU in general,” said Roberta Radovich, a King Day program coordinator in the office of the vice president for diversity, equity and multicultural affairs at IU. “She’s never been to IU before, and we’re very excited to honor her this year.”

Anderson will speak following a screening of “I Am Somebody” at 4 p.m. Friday in the IU Cinema. A reception will follow at 5:45 p.m. in the Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center Grand Hall.

Other films to be shown in the MLK Day Film Festival include “Once Upon A Time … When We Were Colored,” at 3 p.m. Saturday, and “Boycott” at 9:30 p.m. Saturday. All the films are free but require tickets that can be picked up at the IU Auditorium box office during regular business hours or in the cinema lobby an hour before any screening.

MLK Day events kick off at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater Thursday at 7 p.m. with a student art showcase, “Expressions of Dr. King’s Dream for Humanity.”

In a new event this year, IU Athletics will incorporate videos, a special handout and other events at the IU women’s basketball game against Michigan State at 1 p.m. Sunday. Former IU athletes to be recognized include Bill Garrett, Milt Campbell, Denise Jackson and George Taliaferro.

A complete listing of IU MLK Day events can be found at www.indiana.edu/~mlkjr/.

Theater experience

Ivy Tech Bloomington students collaborated with IU students to create “Catalyst: An Emergent Theater Experience inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” The performance looks to express what it means to live in a pluralistic society.

The free performance is at 4 p.m. Sunday in Whittenberger Auditorium in the Indiana Memorial Union. Light refreshments and a conversation with the cast will follow the show.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Tickets available for Ivy Tech’s ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 14, 2013

Tickets available for Ivy Tech’s ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’

A community farewell performance by Diane Kondrat

Tickets are now available for Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s production, Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”, which runs January 25 through February 9, 2013 at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center. The performance is a community farewell to actress Diane Kondrat, in celebration of her 25 years on stage in Bloomington before she moves to Portland, Oregon.

Kondrat has a long history of performances at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

“The Waldron (now Ivy Tech Waldron) has been my main performance space in town,” Kondrat said. “I actually was the first person to perform a theatre piece in the Waldron.”

Kondrat will star in the production as Martha and will be joined by actor Bill Simmons, as George. Kondrat and Simmons will appear in the production under the direction of Patricia McKee. Kondrat and Simmons plan to continue their involvement with Ivy Tech by holding theatre workshops for students.

Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” performances are January 25, 26, 30, 31, and February 1, 2, and 6 – 9, at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are available for purchase at the Buskirk-Chumley box office, or by visiting http://www.bctboxoffice.com/. Tickets are $25/general admission, and $15/students and seniors.

For a full list of productions held at the Ivy Tech Waldron, visit www.ivytech.edu/waldron.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech and IU theatre students collaborate, perform for MLK Day

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 9, 2013

Ivy Tech and IU theatre students collaborate, perform for MLK Day

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington and Indiana University Bloomington students collaborated to create “Catalyst: An Emergent Theater Experience inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.”, to express what it means to live in a pluralistic society. The public is invited to the free performance as a part of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Celebration on Sunday, January 20, at the Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium, 900 E. 7th Street at 4 pm.  Light Refreshments and a cast talk-back will follow the performance.

This collaborative theatre project was created by Eric Love, Director of Indiana University’s Office of Diversity Education, and developed by Love and Gustave Weltsek, Ph.D., Ivy Tech Assistant Professor of Humanities and adjunct professor with the Indiana University Theatre Department facilitating the Drama and Theatre Education licensee program.

For three months, Ivy Tech and IU students were engaged in a series of theatre workshops facilitated by several different theatre educator artists. Among them IU Professor Emeritus Dr. James E. Mumford, Dr. Lili Medina and New York City professional artists/educators Dr. Jodi Vanderhorn-Gibson and Denis A. Allen.

“Students explored the ways race, ethnicity, prejudice, class, gender, and religion affect their lives,” Dr. Weltsek said. “We used arts-based engagements such as dance, voice, visual arts, media arts, applied theatre and Theatre of the Oppressed strategies to explore these complex and sometimes tension-filled issues. These explorations became the bases for the creation of our original production. ”

“Integration of arts into the curriculum is one way that Ivy Tech fulfills its mission as a comprehensive community college,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart. “Theatre courses are a new offering at our campus, along with the Associate of Fine Arts degree program. Almost 55% of Ivy Tech-Bloomington students enroll with the intent to transfer to a four-year institution, which is one of the reasons we provide courses in the arts that transfer.”

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech-Bloomington volunteers in community on MLK Jr. Day

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 8, 2013

Ivy Tech-Bloomington volunteers in community on MLK Jr. Day

 In the tradition of coming together to serve our communities on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Ivy Tech-Bloomington will have volunteers at various area locations on Dr. MLK Jr. Day, Monday, January 14, 2013.

Approximately 50 students, faculty, and staff are expected to volunteer their time to four non-profit organizations. Organizations include Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Monroe County Public Library, Pages to Prisoners, and Pets Alive.

At Habitat ReStore, volunteers will perform various tasks ranging from skilled electrical work to sorting book donations. Ivy Tech volunteers at the Monroe County Public Library will assist with hosting a children’s, educational King Day event. At Pages to Prisoners, volunteers will be reading letters and filling requests from inmates around the state who are requesting books. Items will be packaged for shipping. Pets Alive volunteers will assist the organization by hanging door hangers on 2,000 homes to spread the word about their recent reduction in cost to spay/neuter pets of Crestmont residents and residents in neighborhoods of Stinesville.

Dr. MLK Jr. Day volunteer project coordination is hosted by the Ivy Tech Center for Civic Engagement (www.ivytech.edu/civicengagement).

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Indiana Arts Commission grants open for submissions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 7, 2013

Indiana Arts Commission grants open for submissions

The Indiana Arts Commission (IAC) Regional Initiatives Grants (RIG) are now open for submission for fiscal year 2014 (July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014). Applications are available online at http://indiana.cgweb.org/.

Applications are due March 4, 2013 at 4:30 p.m. EST. Region 8 will not be accepting Mini Grant applications. Panel review will take place April 29, 2013. Final grant reports are due July 11, 2014 at 4:30 p.m. EST.

There have been several changes to the RIG grants from last year. For fiscal year 2014, the minimum budget for an organization to qualify for Arts Operating Support I (AOS I) is now $50,000 averaged over the past three years. There is also a minimum score required to be awarded a grant. Applicants exceeding the minimum score for Arts Project Support (APS) are not guaranteed award of a grant. Efforts will be made to fully fund APS requests starting with applicants receiving the highest scores. Visit www.ivytech.edu/bloomington and click on Indiana Arts Commission Regional Arts Partner to review FY2014 Regional Initiative Grant Guidelines.

Grant workshops will be held:

  • Monday, January 14, 2013, 3:00-4:30 p.m. at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center Auditorium, 122 S. Walnut St. Bloomington, IN  47404
  • Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 3:00-4:30 p.m. at Willow Manor Senior Apartments,

71 Willow Street, Nashville, IN  47448

  • Thursday, January 17, 2013, 3:00-4:30 p.m. at the Lawrence County Community Foundation, 1324 K Street, Bedford, IN  47421

RSVP for free grant workshops to renee@cfbmc.org or call 812-333-9016.

Questions regarding RIG grants can be directed to Renee Chambers at the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County, at 812-333-9016 or renee@cfbmc.org.

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is the Indiana Arts Commission (IAC) Regional Arts Partner for the IAC’s Region 8. Ivy Tech-Bloomington works with the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County to fulfill the functions related to the re-granting of IAC funds within Region 8. Region 8 includes Brown, Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Orange, and Owen counties. For IAC region 8 news, visit www.ivytech.edu/bloomington and click on Indiana Arts Commission Regional Arts Partner.

About the Community Foundation
Created by individuals, families, and businesses who share a passion for Monroe County and a vision for its future, the Community Foundation has granted $18 million to more than 330 local nonprofit organizations. With a growing endowment of over $20 million, the Community Foundation is making a difference by connecting caring people, important causes and community resources.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.