Attorney Geoff Grodner appointed to Ivy Tech-Bloomington Board of Trustees

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 27, 2013

Attorney Geoff Grodner appointed to Ivy Tech-Bloomington Board of Trustees

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus welcomes Geoffrey M. Grodner, attorney, to its Regional Board of Trustees. The Ivy Tech State Board of Trustees signed a resolution appointing Grodner to Ivy Tech -Bloomington’s Regional Board, effective December 6, 2012.

“Geoff has been very actively involved in our community, and supportive of our campus mission,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “We look forward to the perspective and advice he will bring.”

Grodner is Managing Partner of Mallor | Grodner LLP in Bloomington and Indianapolis. He graduated from Indiana University Maurer School of Law in 1975 and is active in law practice and business management issues. He oversees the firm’s business and professional practice services, including business formation, transactions, employment law, and litigation. Grodner served as Acting Chief Counsel to the United States Senate Subcommittee on Constitutional Amendments. He was named as Indiana Super Lawyer®, Business Law, by Law & Politics Magazine in 2004, and annually since 2006. Grodner serves as director, board member, and counsel for numerous non-profit organizations, including the arts.

“I am honored to have been selected to serve on the Board of Trustees,” said Grodner. “I look forward to working with Chancellor Whikehart and his excellent faculty and staff in providing critically needed educational and training opportunities to South Central Indiana.

Grodner’s appointment comes on the heels of previous trustee Dan Peterson’s appointment to the Commission for Higher Education, thus resigning his position on the Regional Board.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Bloomingfoods to open shop at Ivy Tech’s main campus

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Bloomingfoods to open shop at Ivy Tech’s main campus

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
February 23, 2013

Students at Ivy Tech Community College will soon have a new option for on-the-go food and grocery items when Bloomingfoods opens a spot inside the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building at the college’s main campus on Bloomington’s west side.

Remodeling is under way inside The Herald-Times Student Commons to create what will be called Bfoods Ivy Tech. The small cafe/concession/food store will include deli sandwiches and other items, similar to Bloomingfoods’ three other locations as well as a sandwich/panini station and a limited selection of grocery items.

“We really want to brand this as a Bloomingfoods location in our building,” said Ivy Tech Chancellor John Whikehart. “There’ll be signage on the interior and exterior of our building and a separate entrance for the folks who work out here on the west side and particularly in Park 48, where Cook, Baxter, Tasus and some other businesses are located. Eventually we think even patrons of the new west side YMCA might find it a convenient place to stop.”

Whikehart said he was pleased to offer the kind of quality that Bloomingfoods is known for. The agreement with the local food cooperative includes a commitment from Bloomingfoods to offer nutritional information to its Ivy Tech customers.

“I see it as just part of our cooperative mission. We might have guest lectures or brown bag seminars, whatever you want to call it,” said George Huntington, general manager of Bloomingfoods. “We’ve basically agreed to support their educational mission and they’ve agreed to support ours.”

Huntington said the small scale location will be kind of a first for Bloomingfoods but a potential model for similar operations.

Huntington said no exact opening date has been set and the timeline will depend on when certain pieces of equipment that have been ordered are received and can be installed. He said he thinks it’s likely that Bloomingfoods can get the Bfoods Ivy Tech location up and running by or during spring break and can fine-tune the operation over the summer.

Bloomingfoods is a community owned cooperative with more than 10,000 member-owners. The co-op has more than 250 staff and operates three retail grocery locations, with a fourth under construction at the site of the former K&S Country Market in the Elm Heights neighborhood. That location also is expected to open this summer.

IvyTechBloomington
Ivy Tech-Bloomington

George Huntington
George Huntington

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Ivy Tech to host alcohol awareness day

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 21, 2013

Ivy Tech to host alcohol awareness day

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus will host its second annual Alcohol Awareness Day on Monday, February 25 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the main campus in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. Alcohol Awareness Day at Ivy Tech is being hosted by psychology students and faculty just weeks before students depart for Spring Break.

Participants in Alcohol Awareness Day will experience sobriety activities where they will wear goggles that simulate intoxication, and then experience different field sobriety activities such as walking a straight line and tossing a ball. Additionally, students will learn about serving sizes and calculate their personal blood alcohol level in relation to various drink sizes.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, about 18 million U.S. adults have an alcohol use disorder.

A screening instrument, AUDIT, will be available for students to assess their personal level of drinking and counselors will be on hand to discuss the results of the screening in an individual and confidential manner.

Ivy Tech Bloomington’s Office of Student Support and Development has partnered with Indiana University’s Center for Human Growth to offer free counseling services to students through the Counseling and Outreach program. The program provides service to Ivy Tech students in the form of individual counseling and personal growth groups to help with a variety of problems including addiction, depression, stress management, and relationship troubles. All counseling is confidential.

Ivy Tech students can make an appointment with the counseling and outreach center at (812) 330-6287 or by emailing counseling-r14@lists.ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Bloomingfoods café to open at Ivy Tech’s main campus this spring

IvyTech      Bfoods

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 19, 2013

Bloomingfoods café to open at Ivy Tech’s main campus this spring

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has partnered with Bloomingfoods Market and Deli cooperative to bring a café/food store to Ivy Tech’s main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. The food store, referred to as Bfoods Ivy Tech, is under construction and is expected to open later this spring.

Some of the offerings at Bfoods Ivy Tech will include a limited selection of grocery items, grab and go items, a sandwich/panini station, and soups.

“Ivy Tech-Bloomington is extremely pleased to partner with this community resource to provide food services for our students, and serve as a cooperative location on the west side of town,” said Chancellor Whikehart. “While the café is designed to serve our campus, access to Bfoods Ivy Tech by all students, staff, surrounding residents, Park 48, and future YMCA patrons is certainly welcomed and encouraged. What better partnership than our community college and our community food co-op.”

As part of the partnership, Bloomingfoods has agreed to cooperate in the educational mission of Ivy Tech-Bloomington to provide staff support to train and educate students in nutrition and other related subjects.

“Bloomingfoods is pleased to be able to partner with Ivy Tech to provide a cooperative natural food retail outlet on the Ivy Tech campus that will allow us to serve not only Ivy Tech students, staff, and faculty, but also others who live work, and visit the west side of Bloomington,” said George Huntington,” Bloomingfoods General Manager. “We look forward to partnering with our local community college to serve up healthy food and cooperative values to the west side of town.”

Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s main campus is located at 200 Daniels Way off SR 48 on the west side.

About Bloomingfoods

Founded in 1976, Bloomingfoods is a community owned cooperative with more than 10,000 member-owners.  The co-op currently has more than 250 staff and operates three retail grocery locations, with a fourth under construction.  Bloomingfoods is dedicated to good food, excellent customer service, local and regional producers, and giving back to our community.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech-Bloomington and Society of Women Engineers hosts hands-on event for girls on Saturday

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 14, 2013

Ivy Tech-Bloomington and Society of Women Engineers hosts hands-on event for girls on Saturday

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) is hosting a national WOW! That’s Engineering!® event for young women in grades 6-8 on February 23, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Ivy Tech’s main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building.

WOW! That’s Engineering! is designed to encourage young women to become more interested in careers in engineering and technology. There will also be a parent workshop from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

“Girls participating in WOW! That’s Engineering! event will engage in hands-on engineering activities that involve teamwork and creativity,” said Kirk Barnes, Ivy Tech-Bloomington Dean of the Schools of Technology and Applied Science, and Engineering Technology. “They will also celebrate the accomplishments of women engineers and meet role models – professional engineers and college students – who will lead the activities and answer questions about engineering.”

“We are thrilled to be a part of such an important movement: American culture has traditionally misled young girls to believe that they cannot excel in high-technology professions, and as a result, they often hold negative perceptions of engineering careers,” said Tina Closser, President of Society of Women Engineers Southwest Central Indiana Section.  “We look forward to helping to change that perception in south central Indiana, as well as across the country.”

There is a $5 fee for the event and lunch is included. Pre-registration is required due to limited space. To sign up, contact SWCIndianaSWE@gmail.com. For more information about K-12 outreach at SWE, visit http://aspire.swe.org/.

The Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building on Ivy Tech’s main campus is located at 200 Daniels Way off SR 48 on the west side.

About SWE

The Society of Women Engineers (SWE), founded in 1950, is a not-for-profit educational and service organization. SWE is the driving force that establishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women. SWE empowers women to succeed and advance in those aspirations and be recognized for their life-changing contributions and achievements as engineers and leaders.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Pence’s plan for vocational education has role to play

The Herald-Times

Pence’s plan for vocational education has role to play

Our Opinion
February 10, 2013

Gov. Mike Pence acknowledged his surroundings before continuing to talk about his passion for career, technical and vocational education in Indiana high schools.

“I know where I am. I’m in Bloomington,” he smiled during a meeting with the H-T editorial board. The point was, he knew he was in the city in Indiana that more than any other is committed to and champions the value of a college education … and, still, he was suggesting young people not go to college.

Well, that wasn’t exactly what he was suggesting. In fact, he said he would tell every child in the state  that they ought to go to college. But he does not believe every child wants to do so, or needs to do so, to build a successful and productive life. So he wants high schools to develop pathways to success other than the ones that lead to campuses in Bloomington, West Lafayette or elsewhere.

He’s not talking about “shop” or “industrial arts,” and he’s not talking about a one-size-fits-all plan for the state’s high schools. His idea is for regional councils involving educators and business leaders to decide what skill sets are needed for high school graduates to be competitive for a job in their area if they don’t want to go to college immediately. He wants high schools to be able to cater to those skill sets.

What he’s talking about sounds strikingly similar to the adaptability Ivy Tech Community College has developed at its Bloomington campus. He’s talking about clearing a path toward very specific jobs and opportunities in a particular region.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington has done this extremely well in a couple of well-known examples: in creating a strong radiation therapy program to prepare students to work at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (now the IU Health Proton Therapy Center) and a strong hospitality program to help train a work force for the French Lick Springs and West Baden Springs hotels as well as other jobs in the Orange County tourism region.

With those experiences and models in mind, developing high school pathways toward important certifications and skills training makes sense.
Still, the efforts have to complement the strong community college system that has been built in the last decade. It also must complement Indiana’s commitment to research universities, and not just as places students go on the way to a career.

Universities are not trade schools; they’re more like laboratories for absorbing life.

No, not everyone wants or needs to go to a university in order to be successful. But those who do choose higher education may well be exposed to lessons, perspectives, insights, awareness and wisdom they very likely would not have otherwise considered.

Let’s expand opportunities that will make high school students more ready for a career. But let’s also make sure they understand that the value of an education is not defined solely by job placement.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013