Build your future at Ivy Tech’s Career Expo in April

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 29, 2013

Build your future at Ivy Tech’s Career Expo in April

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is hosting its annual Career Expo on Thursday, April 4 from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. This year’s expo, “Build Your Future,” will connect students with nearly 50 employers in South Central Indiana.

“Ivy Tech-Bloomington demonstrates its commitment to responding to community workforce and economic development needs by bringing together employers with job candidates at the college’s annual Career Expo,” said Chancellor John Whikehart.

Career Expo 2013 is open to Ivy Tech alumni, associate degree candidates, students seeking internships, and even those seeking summer employment. It is also open to the diverse job seeker who is looking for a new career or simply looking to network. Participants should expect to network with area business representatives, pass along resumes or business cards, and speak with employers about job openings and internships. Professional attire is preferred.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Career Expo 2013, “Build Your Future,” is sponsored by Cook Pharmica, The Herald-Times, Indiana University Health, Ivy Tech Community College Alumni Association, ModusLink PTS, and South Central Indiana Human Resources Association.

For a full list of participating employers, log on www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/careerexpo/.

For further information about Career Expo 2013, “Build Your Future,” at Ivy Tech, contact the Career Advising Center at (812) 330-6018 or kanderso@ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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List of participating employers (not all-inclusive and subject to change): Author Solutions, Bloomington Developmental Learning Center, Bloomington Police Department, Bloom Marketing Group, Boston Scientific, Chase, City of Bloomington, Cook Pharmica, Duke Energy, Elder Care Connections, French Lick Resort, Garden Villa, Gymboree, Hilton Garden Inn, Indiana State Police, Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Health Bloomington Hospital, Indiana University Human Resources, Indiana University Radio/TV Services, Lifedesigns, Inc., Lowe’s, McCormick’s Creek Rehabilitation & Skilled Nursing, ModusLink PTS, Monroe County Community School Corporation, Monroe County Library, Monroe County YMCA, Nightingale Home Healthcare, Nolan’s Lawn Care, Olive Garden, Paoli, People & Animal Learning Services, Sam’s Club, Storage Express, Stone Belt Arc, Stone Research, TASUS Corporation, Dermatology Center of Southern Indiana, Tradehome Shoes, Western Southern, WTTS/WGCL.

Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute to bring experts on equality, education to campus

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 27, 2013

Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute to bring experts on equality, education to campus

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is hosting its 10th Annual O’Bannon Institute on April 10 through 12. Friday’s full day of panel conversations will focus on this year’s theme of Building the Next Great Generation, and will address generational differences, educational models, and equality.

The day will close with a final conversation at 2:30 p.m. with Judy O’Bannon, former Indiana First Lady and proponent of civic engagement, moderated by Bob Zaltsberg, editor, The Herald-Times. Zaltsberg will talk with O’Bannon about her reflections of the last 10 years of the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service.

O’Bannon has spent much of her life supporting and promoting efforts to strengthen communities in Indiana and around the world. She actively speaks and writes on issues facing society today. She is host of the Emmy-winning, WFYI-TV produced television series Communities Building Community. She travels extensively abroad on humanitarian missions, and has served in a variety of leadership roles.

Friday’s event takes place on Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s main campus at the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building in the Hoosier Times Student Commons. Registration and continental breakfast begins at 8:30 a.m. followed by opening remarks at 9 a.m.

Panel discussion schedule and member list is as follows:

Panel One The Next Greatest Generation: Boomers, Gen X, Y or Z?
9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Moderator: Abdul Hakim-Shabazz, Lawyer, WRTV Commentator, Publisher of IndyPolitics.org
Katharine Byers, Ph.D.: Associate Professor and Director of the BSW Program, Indiana University School of Social Work
Rabbi Jonathan Greenberg: Vice President of External Relations, Illinois Policy Institute
Robert Soto: Associate Professor of Sociology, Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington
Gary C. Steinhardt, Col. USAR (Ret): Past Department Vice Commander of The American Legion Indiana Department

Panel Two The Greatest Innovation: Education – But whose model?
10:45 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Moderator: Bryan Newton, Associate Vice President for Marketing & Enrollment Management, Aiken Technical College
Gerardo Gonzalez: Professor of Higher Education Administration and Dean, Indiana University School of Education
Brent Kent: Indiana State Director, StudentsFirst
David Pillar: Principal, Jackson Creek Middle School
Dr. Suellen Reed: Former Indiana State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Panel Three The Greatest Debate: Equality – How and when do we ever achieve it?
1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
Moderator: Debby Knox, WISH-TV News Anchor
Byron Bangert: Chair of the Bloomington Human Rights Commission, Retired Minister
Jean Capler: President of Fair Talk, Licensed Clinical Social Worker specializing in LGBT issues
Sheila Suess Kennedy: Professor of Law and Public Policy at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
Danny Lopez: Special Assistant to Governor Mike Pence and Executive Director for the Indiana Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs
George Taliaferro: First African American Player Drafted by the NFL

Tom Brokaw, 38-year NBC broadcast journalist and author, will headline the Institute’s Fundraising Dinner on Thursday, April 11 at the Bloomington Monroe County Convention Center. Tickets are no longer available. The event has sold out at more than 400 seats. Proceeds benefit the Ivy Tech Center for Civic Engagement.

Previous keynote speakers of the O’Bannon Institute Fundraising Dinner include Judy O’Bannon in 2004, Senator Birch Bayh in 2005, Senator Alan Simpson in 2006, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend in 2007, Sam Donaldson in 2008, Doris Kearns Goodwin in 2009, Mrs. Laura W. Bush in 2010, James Carville and Mary Matalin in 2011, and George F. Will in 2012.

Each year as part of the Institute, Ivy Tech students, faculty, and staff participate in a Day of Service in our communities. The Day of Service is Thursday, April 11, preceding the Fundraising Dinner, and more than 100 volunteers will give their time to local organizations that day. To kick off the event, Ivy Tech will host its annual Excellence in Civic Engagement awards ceremony on Wednesday, April 10 to recognize faculty, staff and community partners for excellence in volunteerism.

The O’Bannon Institute for Community Service was launched ten years ago by Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus as an annual opportunity for the community to come together to discuss topics related to nonprofits, education and political and civic service. Previous speakers at the Institute have included former U.S. Senators, Pulitzer prize-winning authors, Governors, political advisers and columnists, and Laura W. Bush, former First Lady of the United States.

Admission for Friday panel discussions and closing conversation is with a canned good or free-will monetary donation at the doors for Hoosier Hills Food Bank. Continental breakfast and lunch are provided, but reservations are required. Log on http://obannon.ivytech.edu to reserve your seat, or contact (812) 330-6001 or email tphelps@ivytech.edu.

Further information about the 10th Annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service can be found online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech to offer non-credit stand-up comedy class in association with Limestone Comedy Festival

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 21, 2013

Ivy Tech to offer non-credit stand-up comedy class in association with Limestone Comedy Festival

In association with Bloomington’s inaugural Limestone Comedy Festival, Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Center for Lifelong Learning (www.ivytech.edu/CLL) is offering a class in stand-up comedy starting May 7.

Comedian Mat Alano-Martin will teach Introduction to Stand-Up Comedy, a four-week class that will both explore the evolution of stand-up and teach practical skills in the art of joke-writing and performance. By completion of the class, attendees will write a short stand-up routine and perform it during a special Saturday matinee show at the Limestone Comedy Festival, to be held this summer from June 6 through 8.

“This class is for budding comedians and C-level executives alike,” said Susie Graham, Executive Director of the Center for Lifelong Learning at Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “For leaders, learning stand-up comedy goes beyond the humorous anecdote in the workplace. Attendees will learn the value of light-hearted self-mocking; how to handle hecklers; and to take risks, all of which contribute to effective communication.”

The class runs four Tuesdays starting May 7 through May 28 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and costs $49. It will take place at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

To register, call (812) 330-6041, stop by the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, or log on www.ivytech.edu/CLL.

Mat Alano-Martin is the founder and director of the Limestone Comedy Festival. He is also a professional touring comedian who performs at clubs, colleges, theaters, and festivals across the mid-west. He has worked with Ralphie May, Jim Breuer, Gilbert Gottfried, and Marc Maron to name a few.

About Limestone Comedy Festival
Limestone Comedy Festival (www.limestonefest.com) is a three-day, multi-venue comedy festival held in beautiful Bloomington, Indiana. It was created by Jared Thompson and Mat Alano-Martin, and made possible through the support of their partner venues, sponsors, friends and family.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Emily Bobo, Ph.D. earns Ivy Tech’s President’s Award for Excellence in Instruction

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 18, 2013

Emily Bobo, Ph.D. earns Ivy Tech’s President’s Award for Excellence in Instruction

 Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has selected Emily Bobo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English, as recipient of the 2012 President’s Award for Excellence in Instruction. Bobo is also the regional nominee for the statewide Glenn W. Sample Award for Excellence in Instruction, the College’s highest honor for faculty.

“Emily has earned the regional President’s Award for demonstrating excellence in instruction, for her significant contributions to students and community through service-learning in her courses, and for her numerous professional accomplishments as a poet and prose writer,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “I want to congratulate Emily for winning this prestigious award and for her nomination for the statewide Glenn W. Sample award. She has certainly earned it.”

Bobo is the published author of 20 poems and three prose pieces in national and international, peer-reviewed, print journals such as Seneca Review and Redivider. She is also the published author of a short book of poems, Fugue, in Lost Horse Press’s Emerging Poet Series.

Bobo is founder and adviser of Ivy Tech’s creative writing club and literary magazine. She has raised more than $20,000 in magazine revenue for student writing projects and student scholarships. Outside of Ivy Tech, Bobo has judged poetry writing and recitation competitions for Wichita State University, Poetry Out Loud, and Bloomington’s New Technology High School. She has been a lyricist for Freedom High School’s Choir and has served as volunteer at Midwest Pages to Prisoners.

One of the service-learning projects Bobo developed and currently maintains is Art Into Poetry. Art Into Poetry began in 2009 and is an annual Ivy Tech-Bloomington service-learning project that brings art and poetry together through a form of ancient Greek poetry called Ekphrastic Poetry, or poetry written in response to art. In a series of free, after-school poetry workshops, Bobo’s English classes collaborate with community partners, such as the Crestmont and Ellettsville Boys and Girls Clubs, to teach children to write poems in response to art. Students’ work is presented alongside the art in the April exhibits at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

Bobo was nominee for the 2012 Pushcart Prize for “The Beating Curtain,” short story published in Flint Hills Review. She was also nominee for the 2010 Pushcart Prize for “And the Recovering Musician Wanted to Write a Sonnet,” poem published in Fugue.

The President’s Award for Excellence in Instruction is presented annually to a faculty member from each of Ivy Tech’s 14 regions to recognize faculty who typify excellence in instruction and in representing the mission of the College. Faculty are selected based on their competence in subject matter, innovation, motivation, ability to develop and retain personal relationships, maintenance of low attrition rates, excellence in advising, and representing the college in community-focused activities.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Friday proclaimed Ivy Tech Community College Day in Monroe County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 12, 2013

Friday proclaimed Ivy Tech Community College Day in Monroe County

In celebration of Ivy Tech’s 50 years of changing lives in Indiana, the Monroe County Board of Commissioners has proclaimed the college’s Founders Day of Friday, March 15, 2013 as Ivy Tech Community College Day in Monroe County.

It was March 15, 1963 when the General Assembly created Indiana Vocational Technical College and appropriated $50,000 for its development. Now, Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest post-secondary institution with almost 200,000 students both online and on 30 campuses in 14 regions all over the state of Indiana.

Additionally, Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus (www.ivytech.edu/bloomington) is celebrating its 10th year in its main campus building at 200 Daniels Way on the west side of Bloomington, having opened its doors for Fall semester 2002.

In the past ten years, Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus has grown from serving 2,600 students in 2002 to 6,200 students served in 2012. In the same time, the regional campus has acquired the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center in downtown Bloomington, built the Indiana Center for the Life Sciences on its main campus, and established three Centers – the Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship, the Center for Lifelong Learning, and the Center for Civic Engagement.

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus serves Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Orange, and Owen counties.

For more information about Ivy Tech’s 50years of changing lives, and opportunities to celebrate with us, visit: http://www.ivytech.edu/50th/.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Celebrating spring break by helping others

The Indianapolis Star

Celebrating spring break by helping others

Written by Stephanie Wang

IvyTech_ASB

Naomi Spiering exchanged smiles with a youngster on her Ivy Tech trip last year to Guatemala.
Photo provided by Ivy Tech

Last year, IUPUI student Cole Johnson found himself on spring break in Florida amid the hordes of college partiers celebrating a week of bikinis and booze.

And he spent 168 hours not making a difference in anyone’s life.

“It was almost moving backward,” said Johnson, 22. “I didn’t see a point to it anymore.”

This week, Johnson is leading a group of students from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to work on a farm in Virginia. An “alternative” spring break program, the substance-free trip explores food production and sustainability.

He’s among a growing number of college students who are giving up the traditional go-wild spring break in favor of service learning trips. Indiana colleges say their alternative spring break programs are gaining momentum as students become more aware of social issues on a global scale.

“Sometimes, you have literally no idea what you’re going to get into,” said Johnson, a senior studying supply chain management. “That’s one of the beautiful things about the program. It teaches you to be adaptable and teaches you transferable skills.”

This month, degree-seeking Hoosiers will work with newly arrived immigrant families in Texas, a food bank in Washington, D.C. and Native American communities in Tennessee and New Mexico. They will build houses through Habitat for Humanity in Missouri, repair homes in the Appalachian Mountains and improve the quality of life for people with HIV/AIDS in Indianapolis.

In recent years, alternative break programs have responded to disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and damaging tornadoes in the Midwest and South.

Breakaway, a national alternative break network based in Atlanta, connects programs from 175 schools. Last year, it estimated its members gave more than 600,000 service hours.

So why would college students forsake vacations for service learning trips?

First of all, alternative breaks can be a lot cheaper.

Even with some of the international programs, several Indiana universities subsidize a significant amount. Schools estimate the all-inclusive trips cost about $1,500 to $3,000 per student – but at IUPUI, for example, the students’ portion comes out to just $100.

And civic engagement broadens what students learn in classrooms.

“When I’m in Bloomington, it’s hard for me to realize what social issues really impact our area,” said Indiana University sophomore Kristin Budzik, 20.

When she travels to Ecuador this week to work in the coastal forests, “I’m able to see it in a different light,” she said, “and how (social issues) are affecting our community here.”

The trip is through the Kelley Institute for Social Impact, which combines business with community service and global development.

Alternative breaks expose students to diverse situations. Sometimes, it’s a culture shock.

During a trip last year to Guatemala to build a daycare, Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington students visited families living in one-room shacks with mud floors and no running water. Malnourished children didn’t have shoes and drank from the same river they used as a toilet, remembered Chelsea Rood-Emmick, the campus’s executive director of civic engagement.

When the group left the families, a student broke down into tears.

“You have students who knew that this would be poverty but didn’t realize how real it was going to be,” Rood-Emmick said.

Ivy Tech is returning to Guatemala this year, this time to help local farmers build a middle school.

“You don’t want the students to come back and have romantic views of poverty, or get these views of ‘Anything helps,’ ” Rood-Emmick said. “You have to think critically. How can we help people in a way that’s empowering? In a way that’s constructive, that helps people make differences in their own lives?”

The trips often seem to have a greater influence on changing students’ outlooks, more than changing the lives of the people they help. It can translate in little ways, like a student who becomes more conscious about recycling after an environmental-themed break.

It can translate in larger ways. One of Rood-Emmick’s students joined the Peace Corps. Another switched majors from English to social work.

And some keep at it. Taylor Pennell, 22, an IUPUI senior, has been on four alternative break trips.

“It gets us out of our comfort zone,” she said, “which is, what we’ve come to learn, where we grow the most.”

For her fifth trip, she is leading to Maryland to work in a domestic violence center, the students reflect daily on what they have learned. It starts simple: What did you do? How do you feel?

Then: So what? Why does this matter?

“Now that we’ve had this experience,” Pennell said, “what are you going to do about it?”

Call Star reporter Stephanie Wang at (317) 444-6184.

Ivy Tech to host read-in in student commons Thursday

The Herald-Times

Ivy Tech to host read-in in student commons Thursday

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
March 7, 2013

Ivy Tech Community College will celebrate its third annual Read Across America Day Thursday by providing a forum for people to read up to 10-minute passages from books either banned or challenged with removal from schools and libraries.

The event runs 2-6 p.m. in the student commons of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building at 200 Daniels Way.

Many time slots already have been spoken for by students, faculty and staff, but there likely will be openings throughout the day for the general public, according to English professor Elizabeth Starr. Invariably, she said, some scheduled readers fail to show up or don’t use all of their allotted time.

Readers can take their own books or choose from a selection on-site.

“We’re starting to get a feel of a tradition with this event,” Starr said. “Readers who have read one year get the bug and want to do it again.”

The event is free, and some people attend not intending to read themselves but to hear the readers and the books they’ve chosen. Starr said selections run the gamut from banned and challenged children’s books to Harry Potter novels, the Bible and classic banned books such as Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451.”

Read Across America Day occurs every year on or around the birthday of “Dr. Seuss” — Theodore Geisel. The Dr. Seuss book, “The Lorax,” once was challenged as unfair to the logging industry and will be read Thursday.

In addition, students are running a book drive through March 22 to collect paperback books for Boxcar Books and the Midwest Pages to Prisoners project. Bins will be located throughout Ivy Tech’s main campus.

Those who donate books or volunteer to read at the Read Across America Day event Thursday will receive an “I Read Banned Books” button or free brownies/chocolate truffles supplied by Chef Jeff Tabor’s Ivy Tech hospitality students.

The event is hosted by students in Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s American Literature After 1865 service-learning class and the Creative Writing Club.