Thanks to Ivy Tech for all the good reads

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Thanks to Ivy Tech for all the good reads

Our opinion
April 24, 2013

The folks at the Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington campus have jumped on a really good idea, building and placing three Little Free Libraries in the community.

The little libraries look like good-sized doll houses. Books are stored inside them, with the goal being that some people “check them out,” while others donate their own to the collection.

The three completed by Ivy Tech are going to Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard, Community Kitchen-Crestmont and Middle Way House. Head Start has requested one as well.

The concept is simple and has taken hold worldwide; it’s estimated that 6,000 now exist. When the movement began in Wisconsin in 2009, the hope was to build 2,510 Little Libraries to exceed the number of libraries supported by Andrew Carnegie. The nonprofit’s website now says there are between 5,000 and 6,000 in 36 countries.

Book sharing has essentially been in place informally at some coffee shops and other locations in town where books are available for people to borrow. But these easily recognizable structures, meant to be outside, take the concept of community sharing of knowledge, resources and literacy even further.

Chelsea Rood-Emmick, executive director for the Center for Civic Engagement at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, recognized the potential for our community and is most responsible for getting the Little Free Library project started. She’s still collecting books she believes would be appropriate for the locations earmarked for the first three structures. If you have books to donate, contact her at 330-6037.

LittleFreeLibrary

Two of the dollhouse-sized Little Free Library boxes created by Ivy Tech Community College staff members and students are seen awaiting placement in the community. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Ivy Tech launches Little Free Libraries initiative

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Ivy Tech launches Little Free Libraries initiative

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 22, 2013

When Chelsea Rood-Emmick read a magazine story about Little Free Libraries several months ago, her thoughts immediately went to delight and admiration for the concept.

The little libraries are sturdy, weatherproof boxes that hold a dozen or more books and can be placed anywhere — in yards or public places. They’re usually marked with instructions: “Take a book. Leave a book. Or both!”

The little libraries promote literacy, the sharing of resources and community. And it would be an understatement to say the concept has taken off in a big way.

Started as a small, community-minded project in Wisconsin a year ago, organizers estimate there are now as many as 6,000 Little Free Libraries in places worldwide, from across the United States to developed countries such as Germany and resource-constrained places including Afghanistan and Uganda.

“It kind of surprised me that Bloomington hadn’t latched onto this yet, because it seems like such a Bloomington thing to do,” Rood-Emmick said.

As executive director for the Center for Civic Engagement at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, Rood-Emmick was in a good position to make it happen.

First, she talked to facilities staff members at Ivy Tech, who said they could build the dollhouse-sized libraries out of scrap materials. Then, students involved with the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service volunteered to paint and decorate the three little libraries community organizations requested.

Within a week or two, the sturdy, weatherproof little libraries will be in place at Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard, Community Kitchen-Crestmont and Middle Way House. A fourth has been requested by Head Start, and there very likely will be more on the way, because anyone can build their own.

Rood-Emmick is still collecting books appropriate for each of her inaugural boxes: gardening, canning and nutrition-oriented books for Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard; children’s books for Middle Way House; and a variety for Community Kitchen-Crestmont.

“We fully expect some books to walk away,” she said. “But we also expect that people will be eager to replenish the supply as well.”

The initiative gets the hearty approval of Ivy Tech Chancellor John Whikehart. “It’s civic engagement at its finest,” he said last week. “It’s part of our commitment to giving back.”

Rood-Emmick said she would prefer that potential book donors contact her at 330-6037 rather than dropping off books that may not be appropriate. To learn more about the official Little Free Libraries program, visit www.littlefreelibrary.org.

LittleFreeLibrary
Two of the dollhouse-sized Little Free Library boxes created by Ivy Tech Community College staff members and students are seen awaiting placement in the community. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Ivy Tech course registration open for summer and fall at Orange County Learning Center

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 22, 2013

Ivy Tech course registration open for summer and fall at Orange County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College registration for summer and fall classes is open, and summer classes begin June 10 at the Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley. Students can earn credits toward an Ivy Tech Associate degree by taking classes close to home at the Orange County Learning Center.

Summer courses include computers, public speaking, English, reading strategies, college writing, and new student seminar. Fall classes include computers, public speaking, English, reading strategies, college writing, algebra, psychology, hospitality courses, and new student seminar.

A full list of Ivy Tech classes offered at Orange County Learning Center can be found at www.ivytech.edu/orangecounty.

The Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley is located at 479 S. Larry Bird Blvd. French Lick, Ind. For help applying to Ivy Tech or registering for classes, students can drop in without an appointment, although testing times are by appointment only. Proctored tests for students who need to take distance education exams are also available.

Currently, the Orange County Learning Center office is open Monday-Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 pm. The office is closed for lunch from noon to 1 p.m. and closed during evening classes. For questions, call the learning center at (812) 936-4100 or contact Carol Hudelson at chudelson@ivytech.edu.

A full list of degree offerings at Ivy Tech Community College can be found at: www.ivytech.edu/academics.

About Ivy Tech Orange County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington opened the Orange County Learning Center in January 2012 to provide easy access to higher education and workforce training in Orange County. The center allows students to earn credits toward an Ivy Tech Associate degree by taking classes close to home. Since opening, the learning center has expanded offerings in for-credit academic courses, and non-credit workforce training and personal-enrichment courses.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Bloomingfoods to open new outlet Monday at Ivy Tech

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Bloomingfoods to open new outlet Monday at Ivy Tech

Food co-op’s new location merges a convenience store with a cafe — only healthier

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 21, 2013

The perpetual grin on Alan Simmerman’s face gave some indication this week that he’s pleased with the newest Bloomingfoods location on the Ivy Tech-Bloomington campus.

He gestured toward the coffee station, noted that the supplier is Brown County Coffee Co. and said there will be a dispenser in place that provides natural cane-based sweeteners without dyes or additives.

Like a tour guide, he walked over to the “made to order” food station and said breakfast foods from biscuits and gravy to an egg and avocado sandwich will be offered, as will classic lunch sandwiches and hot paninis.

Moving over to the grocery shelves, he pointed to paper towels, dishwashing soap, cereals and flour; and frozen food including ice cream, organic burritos and waffles.

And then there are the snacks: nuts, seeds, Clif Bars and Fair Trade chocolate.

“This is a new deal for us,” the fresh foods manager for Bloomingfoods said. “It’s kind of a grocery store meets convenience store meets cafe concept, only healthier and a little more green than what you’ll find elsewhere.”

Late last week, store employees were still putting the finishing touches on the “Bfoods Ivy Tech” location inside the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. Announced last winter, the cafe and convenience store will open for business on Monday.

“There’s more in here than I thought you could squeeze into a space this size,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “I’m really pleased, and I can tell you that a lot of students, faculty and staff have been asking for some time now, ‘When’s it going to open?’”

Primarily designed to serve Ivy Tech students on Bloomington’s west side, the store also will be open to and welcoming of the general public, including employees at nearby Cook Inc. and Park 48 businesses and patrons of the future YMCA.

“Obviously, it’s not a full-service grocery and, with a lot of things, there’s just one kind of paper towel, one kind of sugar, that sort of thing,” Simmerman said. “But there is enough here that if you’re on your way home from work, you’ll be able to grab something for dinner and breakfast in the morning as well.”

“We’re really trying to tailor it to the needs of the people who will be using it,” said Rodney Schmidt, one of the store managers. “That’s why we’re having kind of a soft opening, so we can start getting a better idea over time about what works and what could be improved.”

Bloomingfoods
Bloomingfoods’ new store at Ivy Tech Community College just west of Bloomington. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Lockdown: Ivy Tech emergency drill runs smoothly

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Lockdown: Ivy Tech emergency drill runs smoothly

System would be used if a security or weather emergency should arise

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 19, 2013

When a man allegedly threatened to “blow up” the main building at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus last December, the community college launched its lockdown procedures and campus officials generally were pleased with the response.

The alert did expose a major shortcoming in campus security, however, Chancellor John Whikehart admitted this week.

“We didn’t have locks on the classroom doors,” he said. “We did everything in our plan right, but that was something no one ever pointed out or thought about.”

The campus has nearly completed the installation of locks on all classroom doors — a project that could cost as much as $20,000. In March, it activated a new Alertus system that sends out texts and emails if a weather or security emergency arises and even broadcasts alerts on every computer and video screen active on campus.

Late Thursday morning, the campus staged a lockdown drill with the assistance of the Indiana State Police and Monroe County Sheriff’s Office.

“We did well. Everything worked like it was supposed to, and everyone did what they were supposed to do,” said Kyle Giles, security coordinator. “The officers who were here to assist said they were pleased at how quickly everyone responded and secured the facility.”

As soon as the lockdown announcement was made over the intercom system of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, classroom doors shut, lights were turned off, blinds were drawn and students, faculty and staff moved away from windows. Video screens and computers displayed the lockdown message and mobile phones carried the warnings.

The roughly 10-minute lockdown affected five buildings where Ivy Tech Community College operates, including rented facilities on Liberty Drive and the John Waldron Arts Center in downtown Bloomington.

“From my perspective, it’s all about being prepared,” Giles said. “You never know when and you never know where you might have an intruder alert, a tornado warning, an unattended package that looks suspicious.”

The bombings at the Boston Marathon this week were certainly on everyone’s minds, although the drill had been planned well in advance.

“The only thing good you can say about that is that it served as a reminder for everyone that you have to take these things seriously,” Giles said.

Student Sabra Davis said her instructor warned her class in advance that Thursday’s drill was coming.

“I’m really glad, because after Boston I think people would have gotten pretty upset,” she said. “But since we knew it was a drill, everyone stayed calm and did what they were supposed to do. We knew why it was important to do it, too.”

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Ivy Tech-Bloomington expands noncredit offerings into Brown County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 16, 2013

Ivy Tech-Bloomington expands noncredit offerings into Brown County

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is expanding its noncredit, personal enrichment offerings into Brown County, through its Center for Lifelong Learning. Classes will be held at the Brown County Career Resource Center (BCCRC) beginning in May.

“Ivy Tech looks forward to expanding our noncredit course options into Brown County, and we are excited to partner with Brown County artists to deliver these classes,” said Jeffery Allen, Executive Director, Ivy Tech Center for Lifelong Learning.

The first four noncredit courses offered through the Center for Lifelong Learning at the BCCRC are Music Theory, Recreational Guitar Level 1, Recreational Banjo Level 1, and You Can Paint!.

The music theory, guitar, and banjo classes will be taught by Jeff Foster, a Brown County resident and lifelong professional musician and teacher. He was a student of Ethnomusicology at Indiana University, and he went on to teach guitar there and at California State University-Bakersfield. He has researched the use of art in special education programs and was named an official delegate of Yugoslavia at the first Very Special Arts International Festival held in Washington, D.C. in 1989.

You Can Paint! will be taught by Amanda Mathis. Mathis, a Brown County primitive painter, has been teaching, and showing and selling her work for more than 30 years.

To register for any of the classes offered in Brown County, contact the Center for Lifelong Learning at (812) 330-6041 or log on www.ivytech.edu/CLL and click Personal Enrichment, then Classes in Brown County.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Brokaw’s public service idea deserves oxygen

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Our opinion
Brokaw’s public service idea deserves oxygen

The Herald-Times
April 16, 2013

Veteran television journalist and author Tom Brokaw crystallized one of the major problems in Washington, D.C., today when he spoke in Bloomington last week.

“We have a lot of small ideas that divide us,” Brokaw said. “People have very narrow interest groups, from the left all the way across to the right, with the power of a keystroke, the extraordinary way technology has reached, the organized kind of jihads we wage against anyone that doesn’t exactly agree with us.”

And thus, he said, what the nation needs is a Big Idea to unite us.

It was a simple enough notion, and his thought about what that Big Idea could be resonated with his audience, those attending a fundraising dinner for the Ivy Tech O’Bannon Institute for Community Service.

He wants to redefine public service through about six public service academies spread through the nation. Private industry could fund fellows, who would serve the nation primarily through international service before returning to good, productive, fulfilling jobs in the private sector.

It’s an idea that should receive bipartisan support — if any idea can.

Other Big Ideas could be out there as well. But right now, our politicians seem intent to look petty while dividing along party lines on fights that often don’t seem that crucial to Main Street. They could regain some credibility by uniting on something important — something with a clear goal such as serving others.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013