Thanks to Ivy Tech for all the good reads

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Thanks to Ivy Tech for all the good reads

Our opinion
April 24, 2013

The folks at the Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington campus have jumped on a really good idea, building and placing three Little Free Libraries in the community.

The little libraries look like good-sized doll houses. Books are stored inside them, with the goal being that some people “check them out,” while others donate their own to the collection.

The three completed by Ivy Tech are going to Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard, Community Kitchen-Crestmont and Middle Way House. Head Start has requested one as well.

The concept is simple and has taken hold worldwide; it’s estimated that 6,000 now exist. When the movement began in Wisconsin in 2009, the hope was to build 2,510 Little Libraries to exceed the number of libraries supported by Andrew Carnegie. The nonprofit’s website now says there are between 5,000 and 6,000 in 36 countries.

Book sharing has essentially been in place informally at some coffee shops and other locations in town where books are available for people to borrow. But these easily recognizable structures, meant to be outside, take the concept of community sharing of knowledge, resources and literacy even further.

Chelsea Rood-Emmick, executive director for the Center for Civic Engagement at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, recognized the potential for our community and is most responsible for getting the Little Free Library project started. She’s still collecting books she believes would be appropriate for the locations earmarked for the first three structures. If you have books to donate, contact her at 330-6037.

LittleFreeLibrary

Two of the dollhouse-sized Little Free Library boxes created by Ivy Tech Community College staff members and students are seen awaiting placement in the community. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Ivy Tech launches Little Free Libraries initiative

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Ivy Tech launches Little Free Libraries initiative

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 22, 2013

When Chelsea Rood-Emmick read a magazine story about Little Free Libraries several months ago, her thoughts immediately went to delight and admiration for the concept.

The little libraries are sturdy, weatherproof boxes that hold a dozen or more books and can be placed anywhere — in yards or public places. They’re usually marked with instructions: “Take a book. Leave a book. Or both!”

The little libraries promote literacy, the sharing of resources and community. And it would be an understatement to say the concept has taken off in a big way.

Started as a small, community-minded project in Wisconsin a year ago, organizers estimate there are now as many as 6,000 Little Free Libraries in places worldwide, from across the United States to developed countries such as Germany and resource-constrained places including Afghanistan and Uganda.

“It kind of surprised me that Bloomington hadn’t latched onto this yet, because it seems like such a Bloomington thing to do,” Rood-Emmick said.

As executive director for the Center for Civic Engagement at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, Rood-Emmick was in a good position to make it happen.

First, she talked to facilities staff members at Ivy Tech, who said they could build the dollhouse-sized libraries out of scrap materials. Then, students involved with the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service volunteered to paint and decorate the three little libraries community organizations requested.

Within a week or two, the sturdy, weatherproof little libraries will be in place at Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard, Community Kitchen-Crestmont and Middle Way House. A fourth has been requested by Head Start, and there very likely will be more on the way, because anyone can build their own.

Rood-Emmick is still collecting books appropriate for each of her inaugural boxes: gardening, canning and nutrition-oriented books for Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard; children’s books for Middle Way House; and a variety for Community Kitchen-Crestmont.

“We fully expect some books to walk away,” she said. “But we also expect that people will be eager to replenish the supply as well.”

The initiative gets the hearty approval of Ivy Tech Chancellor John Whikehart. “It’s civic engagement at its finest,” he said last week. “It’s part of our commitment to giving back.”

Rood-Emmick said she would prefer that potential book donors contact her at 330-6037 rather than dropping off books that may not be appropriate. To learn more about the official Little Free Libraries program, visit www.littlefreelibrary.org.

LittleFreeLibrary
Two of the dollhouse-sized Little Free Library boxes created by Ivy Tech Community College staff members and students are seen awaiting placement in the community. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Ivy Tech course registration open for summer and fall at Orange County Learning Center

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 22, 2013

Ivy Tech course registration open for summer and fall at Orange County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College registration for summer and fall classes is open, and summer classes begin June 10 at the Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley. Students can earn credits toward an Ivy Tech Associate degree by taking classes close to home at the Orange County Learning Center.

Summer courses include computers, public speaking, English, reading strategies, college writing, and new student seminar. Fall classes include computers, public speaking, English, reading strategies, college writing, algebra, psychology, hospitality courses, and new student seminar.

A full list of Ivy Tech classes offered at Orange County Learning Center can be found at www.ivytech.edu/orangecounty.

The Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley is located at 479 S. Larry Bird Blvd. French Lick, Ind. For help applying to Ivy Tech or registering for classes, students can drop in without an appointment, although testing times are by appointment only. Proctored tests for students who need to take distance education exams are also available.

Currently, the Orange County Learning Center office is open Monday-Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 pm. The office is closed for lunch from noon to 1 p.m. and closed during evening classes. For questions, call the learning center at (812) 936-4100 or contact Carol Hudelson at chudelson@ivytech.edu.

A full list of degree offerings at Ivy Tech Community College can be found at: www.ivytech.edu/academics.

About Ivy Tech Orange County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington opened the Orange County Learning Center in January 2012 to provide easy access to higher education and workforce training in Orange County. The center allows students to earn credits toward an Ivy Tech Associate degree by taking classes close to home. Since opening, the learning center has expanded offerings in for-credit academic courses, and non-credit workforce training and personal-enrichment courses.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Bloomingfoods to open new outlet Monday at Ivy Tech

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Bloomingfoods to open new outlet Monday at Ivy Tech

Food co-op’s new location merges a convenience store with a cafe — only healthier

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 21, 2013

The perpetual grin on Alan Simmerman’s face gave some indication this week that he’s pleased with the newest Bloomingfoods location on the Ivy Tech-Bloomington campus.

He gestured toward the coffee station, noted that the supplier is Brown County Coffee Co. and said there will be a dispenser in place that provides natural cane-based sweeteners without dyes or additives.

Like a tour guide, he walked over to the “made to order” food station and said breakfast foods from biscuits and gravy to an egg and avocado sandwich will be offered, as will classic lunch sandwiches and hot paninis.

Moving over to the grocery shelves, he pointed to paper towels, dishwashing soap, cereals and flour; and frozen food including ice cream, organic burritos and waffles.

And then there are the snacks: nuts, seeds, Clif Bars and Fair Trade chocolate.

“This is a new deal for us,” the fresh foods manager for Bloomingfoods said. “It’s kind of a grocery store meets convenience store meets cafe concept, only healthier and a little more green than what you’ll find elsewhere.”

Late last week, store employees were still putting the finishing touches on the “Bfoods Ivy Tech” location inside the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building. Announced last winter, the cafe and convenience store will open for business on Monday.

“There’s more in here than I thought you could squeeze into a space this size,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “I’m really pleased, and I can tell you that a lot of students, faculty and staff have been asking for some time now, ‘When’s it going to open?’”

Primarily designed to serve Ivy Tech students on Bloomington’s west side, the store also will be open to and welcoming of the general public, including employees at nearby Cook Inc. and Park 48 businesses and patrons of the future YMCA.

“Obviously, it’s not a full-service grocery and, with a lot of things, there’s just one kind of paper towel, one kind of sugar, that sort of thing,” Simmerman said. “But there is enough here that if you’re on your way home from work, you’ll be able to grab something for dinner and breakfast in the morning as well.”

“We’re really trying to tailor it to the needs of the people who will be using it,” said Rodney Schmidt, one of the store managers. “That’s why we’re having kind of a soft opening, so we can start getting a better idea over time about what works and what could be improved.”

Bloomingfoods
Bloomingfoods’ new store at Ivy Tech Community College just west of Bloomington. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Lockdown: Ivy Tech emergency drill runs smoothly

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Lockdown: Ivy Tech emergency drill runs smoothly

System would be used if a security or weather emergency should arise

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 19, 2013

When a man allegedly threatened to “blow up” the main building at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus last December, the community college launched its lockdown procedures and campus officials generally were pleased with the response.

The alert did expose a major shortcoming in campus security, however, Chancellor John Whikehart admitted this week.

“We didn’t have locks on the classroom doors,” he said. “We did everything in our plan right, but that was something no one ever pointed out or thought about.”

The campus has nearly completed the installation of locks on all classroom doors — a project that could cost as much as $20,000. In March, it activated a new Alertus system that sends out texts and emails if a weather or security emergency arises and even broadcasts alerts on every computer and video screen active on campus.

Late Thursday morning, the campus staged a lockdown drill with the assistance of the Indiana State Police and Monroe County Sheriff’s Office.

“We did well. Everything worked like it was supposed to, and everyone did what they were supposed to do,” said Kyle Giles, security coordinator. “The officers who were here to assist said they were pleased at how quickly everyone responded and secured the facility.”

As soon as the lockdown announcement was made over the intercom system of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, classroom doors shut, lights were turned off, blinds were drawn and students, faculty and staff moved away from windows. Video screens and computers displayed the lockdown message and mobile phones carried the warnings.

The roughly 10-minute lockdown affected five buildings where Ivy Tech Community College operates, including rented facilities on Liberty Drive and the John Waldron Arts Center in downtown Bloomington.

“From my perspective, it’s all about being prepared,” Giles said. “You never know when and you never know where you might have an intruder alert, a tornado warning, an unattended package that looks suspicious.”

The bombings at the Boston Marathon this week were certainly on everyone’s minds, although the drill had been planned well in advance.

“The only thing good you can say about that is that it served as a reminder for everyone that you have to take these things seriously,” Giles said.

Student Sabra Davis said her instructor warned her class in advance that Thursday’s drill was coming.

“I’m really glad, because after Boston I think people would have gotten pretty upset,” she said. “But since we knew it was a drill, everyone stayed calm and did what they were supposed to do. We knew why it was important to do it, too.”

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Ivy Tech-Bloomington expands noncredit offerings into Brown County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 16, 2013

Ivy Tech-Bloomington expands noncredit offerings into Brown County

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is expanding its noncredit, personal enrichment offerings into Brown County, through its Center for Lifelong Learning. Classes will be held at the Brown County Career Resource Center (BCCRC) beginning in May.

“Ivy Tech looks forward to expanding our noncredit course options into Brown County, and we are excited to partner with Brown County artists to deliver these classes,” said Jeffery Allen, Executive Director, Ivy Tech Center for Lifelong Learning.

The first four noncredit courses offered through the Center for Lifelong Learning at the BCCRC are Music Theory, Recreational Guitar Level 1, Recreational Banjo Level 1, and You Can Paint!.

The music theory, guitar, and banjo classes will be taught by Jeff Foster, a Brown County resident and lifelong professional musician and teacher. He was a student of Ethnomusicology at Indiana University, and he went on to teach guitar there and at California State University-Bakersfield. He has researched the use of art in special education programs and was named an official delegate of Yugoslavia at the first Very Special Arts International Festival held in Washington, D.C. in 1989.

You Can Paint! will be taught by Amanda Mathis. Mathis, a Brown County primitive painter, has been teaching, and showing and selling her work for more than 30 years.

To register for any of the classes offered in Brown County, contact the Center for Lifelong Learning at (812) 330-6041 or log on www.ivytech.edu/CLL and click Personal Enrichment, then Classes in Brown County.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Brokaw’s public service idea deserves oxygen

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Our opinion
Brokaw’s public service idea deserves oxygen

The Herald-Times
April 16, 2013

Veteran television journalist and author Tom Brokaw crystallized one of the major problems in Washington, D.C., today when he spoke in Bloomington last week.

“We have a lot of small ideas that divide us,” Brokaw said. “People have very narrow interest groups, from the left all the way across to the right, with the power of a keystroke, the extraordinary way technology has reached, the organized kind of jihads we wage against anyone that doesn’t exactly agree with us.”

And thus, he said, what the nation needs is a Big Idea to unite us.

It was a simple enough notion, and his thought about what that Big Idea could be resonated with his audience, those attending a fundraising dinner for the Ivy Tech O’Bannon Institute for Community Service.

He wants to redefine public service through about six public service academies spread through the nation. Private industry could fund fellows, who would serve the nation primarily through international service before returning to good, productive, fulfilling jobs in the private sector.

It’s an idea that should receive bipartisan support — if any idea can.

Other Big Ideas could be out there as well. But right now, our politicians seem intent to look petty while dividing along party lines on fights that often don’t seem that crucial to Main Street. They could regain some credibility by uniting on something important — something with a clear goal such as serving others.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Ivy Tech building community by launching ‘Little Free Libraries’

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 15, 2013                                        

Ivy Tech building community by launching ‘Little Free Libraries’

BLOOMINGTON – Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus, as part of a nationwide movement and inspired by last week’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service, has built three “Little Free Libraries” for sharing books among the community. The movement is a worldwide one, as far as Germany and Afghanistan.

“Little Free Libraries” are miniature libraries in weatherproof boxes placed throughout communities for making books more accessible, and encouraging literacy. 

“All of our books will be donated, both children’s and adult books,” said Chelsea-Rood Emmick, Executive Director, Center for Civic Engagement, Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “The libraries are made of scrap materials and cost us literally nothing, except for some paint to decorate them. The idea is to promote the love of reading everywhere.”

Ivy Tech has built three ‘Little Free Libraries’ and currently has homes for all of them. They will be placed at Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard, Community Kitchen-Crestmont, and Middle Way House.

Residents are encouraged to borrow and donate books, or build and decorate their own “Little Free Libraries” among the community.

More information about Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Center for Civic Engagement at www.ivytech.edu/civicengagement.

More information about the “Little Free Libraries” movement at www.littlefreelibrary.org.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech takes on controversial, award-winning novel ‘The Giver’

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Theater

Ivy Tech takes on controversial, award-winning novel ‘The Giver’

Phoenix takes on Tony-winner “Clybourne Park”

By Joel Pierson H-T Columnist
April 14, 2013

Ivy Tech’s theater students take to the stage this week in “The Giver,” a stage adaptation of Lois Lowry’s popular but controversial Newberry Award-winning novel.

The apparent utopian society of the story soon turns out to be anything but, as it is revealed that the culture has eliminated not only pain and struggle, but also any meaningful emotion at all.

As the Newberry Medal suggests, this is a children’s story — appropriate for middle school audiences and above. The story of 12-year-old Jonas is an emotional one. He is chosen to be the keeper of all the society’s memories from the time before the “Sameness” rounded the edges off of everyone’s feelings. He meets the previous keeper of these memories — the Giver of the play’s title — and makes some startling discoveries. He learns just how much the people of his culture are missing by denying themselves the ability to feel. He must then decide whether to choose a life of safety, devoid of feelings, or run away to a life of danger and great emotions.

“The Giver” has a very sophisticated and complex plot, and it is not often staged. If Eric Coble’s adaptation captures the spirit of the novel and the performers can bring it to life, it should be an evening of theater that gives families plenty to talk about.

“Clybourne Park”

At the Phoenix Theater in Indianapolis, they’re in the middle of their run of Bruce Norris’ “Clybourne Park,” which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2011 and a Tony Award for Best Play in 2012. Drawing from the powerful 1959 play, “A Raisin in the Sun,” this play focuses on the house that the family from “Raisin” wanted to purchase — looking at events before and after the action of that play.

Act I of “Clybourne Park” takes place in 1959, as a couple in a white, middle-class Chicago neighborhood is planning to sell their home. A neighbor informs them that a black family wants to buy the house, and the sellers are pressured not to go through with the deal. A heated discussion follows about racial harmony and fairness for all.

Act II jumps ahead 50 years, to the same house. The cast from Act I returns as different characters. Clybourne Park is now an all-black neighborhood, and a white couple wants to buy the house. In a twist of events, it is the white couple who now have to petition for their right to move in, facing opposition from the local neighborhood committee.

Drawing from such a respected piece of literature as “A Raisin in the Sun” — itself drawn from an actual historical court battle — “Clybourne Park” tackles some difficult questions and issues and humanizes the struggles the characters face. It’s important to note that audience members do not need to have read or seen “Raisin” to appreciate this play.

“Every one of us grew up in a neighborhood of some kind. Urban or country or suburban — we all grew up surrounded by the personalities, textures and influences of the community around us,” said director Bryan Fonseca. “For good or for bad, home is where the heart — and history — is.”

Contact Joel by sending an email to features@heraldt.com with “Pierson” in the subject line.


If you go

WHO: Ivy Tech Theater Department

WHAT: “The Giver” by Lois Lowry, adapted by Eric Coble

WHERE: Rose Firebay, Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. April 19-20, 26; 2 p.m. April 27

TICKETS: $5-$15, available at www.bctboxoffice.com.

 

WHO: Phoenix Theater

WHAT: “Clybourne Park” by Bruce Norris

WHERE: 749 N. Park Avenue, Indianapolis

WHEN: 2 p.m. April 14, 21, 28, May 5; 7 p.m. April 18, 25, May 2; 8 p.m. April 19-20, 26-27, May 3-4

TICKETS: $18-$28. Available by phone at 317-635-7529 or online at phoenixtheatre.org.
Courtesy photo From left, Lisa Ermel, Eric J. Olson and Constance Macy rehearse a scene from “Clybourne Park,” the latest production from the Phoenix Theater in Indianapolis.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

O’Bannon Institute panel: Equality still an elusive reality

HeraldTimesOnline.com

O’Bannon Institute panel: Equality still an elusive reality

By Rachel Bunn 331-4357 | rbunn@heraldt.com
April 13, 2013

Equality is an elusive concept, and though progress has been made over the past 60 years to improve access to all people, there are still many ways in which society fails, according to panelists at the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service.

Panelists, representing different sections of the population, discussed the past, present and future of equality Friday at Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington. WISH-TV’s lead anchor Debby Knox was the panel’s moderator.

Panelist George Taliaferro, former Indiana University football player and the first black player drafted by the National Football League, said he jokes with his black friends that white people still have the lead in society, but also noted there is a lot of truth to his statement.

Taliaferro was passing out candy on Halloween in 2005 to three trick-or-treaters who had knocked on his door. As he placed candy in the bag of the third child, the child turned to him and said, “Thanks, n—er,” he recalled.

“Equality — until white people get the notion that they are not better than any other human being on the face of the Earth just because they are white — it’s not going to change,” Taliaferro said. “That’s the thing that bothered me.”

There is a fundamental change in thinking that needs to take place in society, agreed Byron Bangert, chairman of the Bloomington Human Rights Commission. People need to consider that everyone deserves opportunities to have things like health care, education and other public services.

“When you look at our society today, it seems to me that equal opportunity does not exist for most of our citizens,” he said.

Thinking has already begun to change on many equality issues.

Sheila Suess Kennedy, professor of law and public policy in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, recalled one of her first job interviews at a law firm, where the partners interviewing her equated being a woman with having a glass eye.

But now, she said, there’s broader thinking among younger people that often clashes with opinions of the older generation.

“I look at my students and I think, just kill my generation off and things will get a whole lot better,” Kennedy said. “My students are engaged. They are worried about their communities. They understand the inequities in fiscal things that we’re discussing. They are concerned about the common good in a way that I’m afraid that my generation isn’t.”

There are other things that need attention.

Jean Capler, a social worker and president of Fair Talk, a grassroots group working to achieve full marriage equality for same-sex couples in Indiana, said she feels that though attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons have improved, there have been no legal actions to improve their status.

“We’ve come so far in so many ways, and yet, it’s still the case that a social work colleague of mine is married to the person she loves, and they pay their taxes and she has her social work practice in town, and I have my social work practice in town and I’m legally barred here in Indiana from marrying the person I love,” Capler said.

Having conversations with people from diverse backgrounds is one of many ways to bring equality issues to the forefront of public thinking, panelists said.

Though Kennedy may think her generation is holding the younger ones back, Capler said she was not ready to give up on all people coming together to work on equality issues.

“All of us, if we’re really going to achieve anything close to equality, whether it’s economic equality, or equality around certain civil rights issues, I think it comes down to all of us taking responsibility to not sit on the sidelines and be quiet,” Capler said.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Judy O’Bannon at O’Bannon Institute

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Judy O’Bannon at O’Bannon Institute

By Chris Howell H-T Photographer
April 13, 2013

judy obannon

Judy O’Bannon, former Indiana first lady, speaks during a conversation Friday moderated by Bob Zaltsberg, editor of The Herald-Times, at the O’Bannon Institute at Ivy Tech Community College in Bloomington.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Tom Brokaw: America needs ‘big idea’ to unite populace

HeraldTimesOnline.com
Tom Brokaw: America needs ‘big idea’ to unite populace
O’Bannon Institute features former NBC News anchor

By Rachel Bunn 331-4357 | rbunn@heraldt.com
April 12, 2013

All you need is a big idea.

That, according to veteran journalist Tom Brokaw, is what’s missing from America right now: the big idea.

“We have a lot of small ideas that divide us,” Brokaw said. “People have very narrow interest groups, from the left all the way across to the right, with the power of a keystroke, the extraordinary way technology has reached, the organized kind of jihads we wage against anyone that doesn’t exactly agree with us.”

Brokaw, NBC News journalist and author, spoke to about 460 people as part of the O’Bannon Institute for Community Service’s annual fundraising dinner Thursday at the downtown convention center. The theme for this year’s Ivy Tech Community College event, which continues today, is “Building the Next Great Generation.”

The next generation, in Brokaw’s opinion, needs something big to unite it and push it past all the small divisions.

Big ideas of the past, from the GI Bill, which sent millions of veterans to college following World War II, to President Ronald Reagan’s talks with former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, which led to the fall of the Berlin Wall, worked to move America forward and fundamentally change the way the population thinks.

Redefining public service might be the next big idea, Brokaw said, putting a different face on America for the rest of the world, sending young people into other countries to work and learn in public service for several years.

“They would come back with language, they would come back with knowledge of the political system of another county,” he said. “Our country would be lifted by a big idea.”

Tragedies, Brokaw said, have a way of bringing the country together. America, however, has missed these opportunities to unite, particularly after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Now, Brokaw hopes that there’s something else, whether it’s his public service idea or some other idea, that people can get behind.

“I’m just the troublemaker,” he said. “The catalyst trying to make something happen.”

Working together and uniting is an idea that has permeated America’s past, despite individual political leanings.

Brokaw shared the story of three young men who were injured during World War II, who were from all different parts of the county and shared a hospital room. They shared dreams and goals and became lifelong friends.

The next time Daniel Inouye, Bob Dole and Philip Hart shared a room, they were members of the U.S. Senate, Brokaw said.

The most important image of the past six months, he said, is one of Dole, a Republican, saluting the coffin of Inouye, a Democrat.

“It’s that kind of imagery that we need to see more of, and we need to think about again,” Brokaw said.

brokaw 2
Tom Brokaw, author and former NBC News anchor, talks with attendees at the annual dinner for Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

brokaw-3
Tom Brokaw, author and former NBC News anchor, greets Judy O’Bannon and Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart Thursday prior to the annual dinner for Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service. Judy O’Bannon is the widow of former Indiana Gov. Frank O’Bannon, for whom the institute is named. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

brokaw-4
Tom Brokaw, author and former NBC News anchor, stands with Judy O’Bannon Thursday prior to the annual dinner for Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service. Judy O’Bannon is the widow of former Indiana Gov. Frank O’Bannon, for whom the institute is named. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

O’Bannon Institute event ‘walks the walk’ on engagement

HeraldTimesOnline.com
Our opinion
O’Bannon Institute event ‘walks the walk’ on engagement

The Herald-Times
April 11, 2013

The O’Bannon Institute, an annual Ivy Tech Community College event named after former Indiana Gov. Frank O’Bannon, stresses getting involved in the life of your community. That can be done through volunteering for a good cause, serving on a public board or commission, running for public office or just being informed on important local issues.

As the institute celebrates its 10th year, it’s time to call it what it is: a smashing success.

A lot of different parts make it so. Big-name keynote speakers have been attracted for the Thursday night dinner, and that includes former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw, tonight’s guest.

The panels on Friday have focused on important local, state, national and international issues, featuring experts from the national political stage as well as those with knowledge on local, regional and state issues. And the session-ending “conversation” involves insightful guests, from the late Sen. George McGovern to political columnist Eugene Robinson to NPR correspondent Cokie Roberts.

All of those scheduled events complement something of at least equal value to the community — the strong commitment to civic engagement imbued in Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff.

As Ivy Tech Bloomington campus Chancellor John Whikehart noted this week, through volunteerism and service learning, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has contributed the equivalent of $1,185,995 in the communities it serves. That calculation comes from 33,000 volunteer hours through service learning classes and another 21,000 individual volunteer hours reported by Ivy Tech students, faculty and staff.

Today, more than 100 volunteers from Ivy Tech will participate in a Day of Service around the community.

All this adds up to one of the very best things about the O’Bannon Institute: It symbolizes walking the walk. The speakers and panels are inspiring, to be sure. But pairing them with real, measurable engagement activities makes this event even more special.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

 

Awards Wednesday to kick off Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Awards Wednesday to kick off Ivy Tech’s O’Bannon Institute

TV journalist Tom Brokaw to speak at sold-out fundraiser Thursday night

By Mike Leonard 331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com
April 10, 2013

With longtime television anchorman Tom Brokaw speaking Thursday night and a spate of panel discussions Friday, Ivy Tech-Bloomington will offer plenty for the public to consume as it celebrates its 10th annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service with the theme “Building the Next Great Generation.”

Not as prominent but equally important is the awards ceremony the campus will stage Wednesday to honor faculty, staff, students and community partners.

“One of our campus goals at Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington is to model a service-oriented learning environment,” Chancellor John Whikehart said in a prepared statement. “In the past year, through volunteerism and service learning, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has contributed a total value of $1,185,995 in the communities we serve.”

In the 2012-13 academic year, 3,546 students in 76 service learning classes contributed nearly 33,000 volunteer hours in the Bloomington campus service area of Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Morgan, Monroe, Orange and Owen counties. Ivy Tech calculates that the effort amounts to a $729,513 contribution from classes that have service components written into the curriculum.

In volunteer hours alone, Ivy Tech students, staff, and faculty reported nearly 21,000 volunteer hours at 80 agencies or organizations for a total value of $456,482.

The values assigned to service learning and volunteer hours were compiled using measures from Independent Sector, a coalition of about 600 nonprofits, foundations and corporate giving programs.

“This year’s totals are nearly $300,000 more than last year’s Ivy Tech contributions in the community,” said Chelsea Rood-Emmick, the executive director for the Center for Civic Engagement at Ivy Tech. “We’ve seen some tremendous growth in service-learning and volunteer programs, and we’re celebrating that at this year’s O’Bannon Institute for Community Service.”

Awards to be given Wednesday, beginning at 4 p.m. in the student commons, include:

• The Community Partner Award to the Area 10 Agency on Aging.

• The Ivy Tech Waldron Community Partner Award to the Lotus Education and Arts Foundation.

• The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship Community Partner Award to Art Sanctuary in Martinsville.

• The Excellence in Student Volunteerism Award to Jessica Troxel, a volunteer at the Recovery Engagement Center since 2010.

• The Excellence in Faculty/Staff Volunteerism Award to Chanden Strunk in the Human Resources Office.

• The Excellence in Volunteerism Award goes to Amy Brier, art instructor.

• The Jeanine C. Rae Humanitarian Award goes to student Jonathan Holland, who has done extensive work with at-risk populations, including people struggling with addiction recovery and those re-entering society after incarceration.

• An inaugural John R. Whikehart Civic Engagement Award will be introduced and presented to the person who “epitomizes” the award, Chancellor John R. Whikehart.

Other institute events

Brokaw’s Thursday night’s address at the annual O’Bannon Institute fundraising dinner is sold out.

Friday’s panel discussions are open to the public but require reservations and a canned goods or free-will cash donation to benefit the Hoosier Hills Food Bank.

Sessions include:

• “The Next Greatest Generation: Boomers, Gen X, Y or Z?” 9:30-10:30 a.m. Panelists include Katharine Byers, Indiana University; Rabbi Jonathan Greenberg, Illinois Policy Institute; Robert Soto, Ivy Tech; Gary C. Steinhardt, American Legion. Moderator is Abdul Hakim-Shabazz, attorney.

• “The Greatest Innovation: Education — But whose model?” 10:45-11:45 a.m. Panelists include Gerardo Gonzalez, IU; Brent Kent, StudentsFirst; David Pillar, Jackson Creek Middle School; Suellen Reed, former state superintendent for public instruction. Moderator is Bryan Newton, Aiken Technical College.

• “The Greatest Debate: Equality — How and when do we ever achieve it?” 1-2:15 p.m. Panelists include Byron Bangert, Bloomington Human Rights Commission; Jean Capler, Fair Talk; Sheila Suess Kennedy, IUPUI; Danny Lopez, Indiana Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs; George Taliaferro, former Indiana University and NFL football player. Moderator is Debby Knox, WISH-TV news anchor.

• “Conversation with Judy O’Bannon: Reflections on the past 10 years of the O’Bannon Institute,” 2:30-3:30 p.m. Moderator is Bob Zaltsberg, The Herald-Times editor.

More information about the annual O’Bannon Institute for Community Service can be found online at http://obannon.ivytech.edu.

brokaw
Tom Brokaw. Courtesy photo

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Ivy Tech to award honorary degrees in celebration of college’s 50 years

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 10, 2013

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus, in celebration of the College’s statewide 50th Anniversary, will award several honorary associate degrees at its 2013 Commencement Ceremony on May 17.

“Ivy Tech Community College, system-wide, plans to award honorary associate degrees to 50 individuals around the state who have made significant contributions to community service,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “The Bloomington campus has selected four benefactors and friends of Ivy Tech-Bloomington in honor of the College’s 50 years of changing lives.”

Select recipients of Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s honorary associate degrees include Former State Senator Vi Simpson, Former Indiana First Lady Judy O’Bannon, Indiana Legend George Taliaferro, and Judge Viola Taliaferro.

As one of Indiana’s most effective and respected leaders, former State Senator Vi Simpson, has spent a career fighting for causes that matter most to Hoosiers. First elected to the Senate in 1984, she was elected Democrat Leader by the Senate Democratic Caucus in 2008. In her time in the Senate, Simpson has worked to make health care more affordable and accessible for Indiana residents, led the fight to restructure the state’s economy to become globally competitive, and has been a tireless advocate for improving Indiana’s public schools and universities. Widely recognized as an expert on the state’s finances, Simpson served as the caucus representative on the State Budget Committee from 1998-2007. She was the first woman to serve and lead this committee.

Former Indiana First Lady (1997-2003), Judy O’Bannon, has spent much of her life as a proponent of strengthening communities in Indiana and around the world. She is host of the Emmy-winning, WFYI-TV produced, television series Communities Building Community. She travels abroad on humanitarian missions that she incorporates into her television series Judy O’Bannon’s Foreign Exchange, which looks at the commonality of community development efforts worldwide. She has served in a variety of leadership roles: on the Executive Board of Directors of Indiana Landmarks, the chairwoman for the Indiana Main Street Council, as trustee of the Indiana State Museum, a member of the Indiana Arts Commission, a founding member of the Advisory Board of Silvercrest Children’s Development Center, and chair of the Old Centrum Foundation.

George Taliaferro, as the leading rusher and All-American at Indiana University, led the football program to their only undefeated Big Ten Conference Championship. As three-time All-American, Taliaferro was inducted into the College Football Hall Of Fame in 1981. Taliaferro was the first African-American drafted into the National Football League, picked up by the Chicago Bears, but had already committed to play instead with the L.A. Dons of the All-American Football Conference in 1949. He moved to the NFL in 1950. In 1970, he returned to IU to work as a special assistant to President John Ryan, to develop a university-wide affirmative action plan. Taliaferro, a true Indiana legend, is active in numerous community organizations in his home of 35 years, Bloomington.

Judge Viola Taliaferro retired from a career as a circuit-court judge specializing in juvenile justice. She was the first African-American to serve as a judge in Monroe County. Taliaferro has lived in Bloomington the last 35 years. She is active in numerous community organizations. Judge Taliaferro has served on the board of directors of the Bloomington and Monroe County Community Foundation for the past five years and has also served as president of the board for one year. Taliaferro earned a national reputation because of her integrity and constant commitment to excellence, traits she continued to exhibit as juvenile justice consultant to Attorney General Janet Reno and a member of the National Research Council on Juvenile Justice.

For more information about Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s commitment to civic engagement, visit www.ivytech.edu/civicengagement.