Ivy Tech summer camps for kids in Orleans – Last chance to register

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 30, 2013

Ivy Tech summer camps for kids in Orleans – Last chance to register

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington is offering summer camps for children in grades K-6 at Burton-Kimble Farms in Orleans, beginning June 11. Friday, June 7, is the last chance to register for “Summer Songs, Games and Musical Instruments.”

Register by June 7 for “Summer Songs, Games and Musical Instruments.” This two-day camp will be held on June 11 and 13 from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. Activities on June 11 will focus on fun and easy old-fashioned games and crafts. Activities on June 13 will focus on songs, chants, and dances. Children will make musical instruments from recycled objects and learn simple tunes and chants. They will also learn circle games, a square dance, and a German folk dance. Children should wear comfortable shoes. Registration ends June 7. Camp cost is $39, and includes healthy snacks each day.

Register now for “Summer Science for Kids.” This three-day camp will be held July 9 through 11 from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m.. The theme of day 1 activities is “All About Owls.” Children will study owl habits, and get an up-close look at how they work. They will learn about the prey/predator relationship by studying bones and skulls of many animals, and dissect an owl pellet. The theme of day 2 activities is “Birds.” Children will learn about birds: how they fly, what they eat, and where they live. They will study how weather affects them and how they survive. They will also make a bird house to take home. The theme of day 3 activities is “Butterflies.” Children will learn how to attract butterflies to a garden. They will study the stages of the butterfly life cycle and learn what they eat as they grow from egg to adult. They will also make a butterfly craft to take home. Camp cost is $49, and includes healthy snacks each day.

To register for summer camps at Burton- Kimble Farms, visit www.ivytech.edu/CLL and click on “Youth Summer Camps 2013”, or call (812) 330-6041. Burton-Kimble Farms is located at located at 2058 E. CR 800N in Orleans, Indiana, two miles east of SR37.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech and City Launch Efficient Facilities Workshop

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 30, 2013

Ivy Tech and City Launch Efficient Facilities Workshop

Workshop for facility managers and property owners to share efficiency and cost-saving practices

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington, in partnership with the City of Bloomington, is hosting an Efficient Facilities workshop on Wednesday, June 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at City Hall. The purpose of the event is to provide facility managers with an opportunity to share energy, water, waste efficiency, and cost-saving practices, and identify knowledge sharing and training options.

“Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Corporate College hopes to gain feedback from workshop attendees about what kind of certifications and training would be useful to Bloomington’s facility management workforce, as well as individual property owners,” said Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart. “Corporate College would then develop customized training solutions.”

“At the City we’ve implemented cost- and energy-saving measures across all of our facilities,” Mayor Mark Kruzan said. “This network is an opportunity for us to share what we’ve learned and receive suggestions and feedback from our community peers.”

Reservations are required.  There is a nominal fee of $10 to cover the cost of the lunch that will be provided.  RSVP by June 3 to Jacqui Bauer by phone (812.349.3418), email (bauerj@bloomington.in.gov) or online (http://www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/corporate-college/).

For more information about Ivy Tech Corporate College, visit http://www.ivytech.edu/corporatecollege/.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Fairview Elementary students’ tile sculpture to be a lasting contribution

The Herald-Times

IN SCHOOL

Fairview Elementary students’ tile sculpture to be a lasting contribution

Ivy Tech art center project pairs up youngsters, artist Marcy Neiditz

By April Toler
331-4353 | atoler@heraldt.com

May 28, 2013

When Dawnye Smith set about creating a ceramic tile for a project her school was creating for the B-Line Trail, the sixth-grader decided to make it personal.

So she set about creating two flowers surrounded by the phrase “I love my family,” a special note to the students and teachers Dawnye has spent the last five years with at Fairview Elementary School.

“I came up with it because I’ve been going to Fairview for five years and Fairview is kind of like my family,” she said.

Dawnye’s tile is one of more than 300 created by Fairview kindergartners and sixth-graders as part of a collaboration between the school and the Center for Lifelong Learning Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

Throughout the year, the center has been working on various projects with Fairview students, including creating an art piece that now sits west of the Showers Building on the B-Line Trail.

The piece was conceptualized by artist Marcy Neiditz, who helped the students create the tiles. On Thursday, the Fairview artists got a chance to see the finished project during a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Following the ceremony, the students scrambled to find their tiles among the display.

“It turned out better than I thought it would,” said sixth-grader Shane Pedro.

For his piece, Shane created a view of his house and the street he lives on. Although excited to see the finished project, Shane was even more excited to show it off to his family.

“My mom and dad and I walk this trail all the time,” he said.

The idea of students being able to walk along the trail and see art work they created was one of the highlights of the project for Jeffery Allen, assistant director for the Center for Lifelong Learning Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

The project also created the relationship between Fairview and Ivy Tech that led to work funded by the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County with Fairview preschool that will take place in the 2013-14 school year.

“We’ve now said to the children in our community that what you do matters,” he said.

After seeing all of the children’s smiling faces Thursday, Neiditz said she would like to be a part of more community-based art projects.

“My dream is to have it go beyond kids,” she said. “I think we should all take pride in art in the community and I would like to see this project grow.”

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Josiah Rice proudly shows his tile to his parents as he and other Fairview Elementary School students dedicate their sculpture last week on the B-Line Trail in front of the Showers Building. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

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Fairview Elementary School students look for the tiles they each made after Thursday’s dedication ceremony for their sculpture on the B-Line Trail in front of the Showers Building. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

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Fairview Elementary School students look for the tiles they each made after Thursday’s dedication ceremony for their sculpture on the B-Line Trail in front of the Showers Building. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

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Jaylee French peers at the tiles Thursday as Fairview students dedicate their sculpture on the B-Line Trail in front of the Showers Building. David Snodgress | Herald-Times

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart to give New Tech graduate address, Valedictorian to attend Ivy Tech in the fall

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 28, 2013

Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart to give New Tech graduate address, Valedictorian to attend Ivy Tech in the fall

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus Chancellor John Whikehart will give the graduate address at New Technology High School’s graduation ceremony on Friday, May 31 at the Buskirk-Chumley at 7 p.m.

“I am honored to be asked to speak at this momentous occasion for New Technology graduates, and happily accepted,” said Chancellor Whikehart. “Ivy Tech Community College and New Technology High School, soon to be the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship, have developed a strong educational partnership over the past five years, and we look forward to new plans for the future.”

New Tech Valedictorian, Carson Martin, has chosen to begin her academic journey at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus in the fall, where she will work toward an associate degree. She plans to transfer her associate degree to Indiana University to study journalism with a telecommunications and marketing focus. Martin comes to Ivy Tech in the fall with 15 college credits, earned in the dual credit program.

Dual credit is an option for high school students to simultaneously take college classes while in high school, and receive college credits while fulfilling high school requirements.

Over the past five years, New Technology High School students have earned a total of 669 dual credits through Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus. In just this past year, students earned 288 credit hours, for a total tuition savings of $96,033.60.

Of the graduating class, 18 will attend Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus for the Fall Semester; that’s 47 percent of the graduating class.

Ivy Tech-Bloomington has developed the Pathways to College Partial Tuition Waver program for Spring Semester 2013 dual credit, high school graduates. If dual credit students enroll at Ivy Tech-Bloomington as a full-time, degree seeking student, they may qualify for the program.

For more information about earning high school dual credits at Ivy Tech-Bloomington or for details about Ivy Tech-Bloomington Pathways to College, contact Denise Travers at (812) 330-6281 or dtravers@ivytech.edu.

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Partnership in Bloomington area encourages start-ups

HeraldTimesOnline.com

It’s your business

Partnership in Bloomington area encourages start-ups

By Steve Bryant
A Bloomington voice
May 24, 2013

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce recently released the Enterprising States report (www.freeenterprise.com/enterprisingstates/#about) that details how well individual states are performing at enterprise creation (a.k.a. entrepreneurship).

Indiana was ranked in 43rd place in the report, mostly due to lack of a high number of new business start-ups.

So, what’s a state to do to improve the climate for entrepreneurship?

Ivy Tech’s Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship, the city of Bloomington, Bloomington Economic Development Corp. and a host of other local agencies, partners and friends have been working on development of an Entrepreneurship and Innovation Road Mapping Project funded through the Impact Grant program of the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County.

Essentially, we are trying to determine how to build a better environment to support people who want to own and operate a business.

Not an easy task, but we have a pretty good environment for entrepreneurship and innovation started here already. There are many local entrepreneurial success stories, organizations that foster innovation (SproutBox, Indiana University, Crane), agencies to assist with advice and counseling (Small Business Development Corp. and SCORE, a group that offers financial and planning advice to start-ups), world-class entrepreneurship centers at Indiana University (Johnson Center), the Cook Center and a community that loves its local startup scene.

So, what’s missing?

We are trying to get to the bottom of that by researching trends, needs and wants of entrepreneurs and the types of tools and programs necessary to enable more people to start their own venture. With the huge amount of brain power coming out of IU, Crane, Ivy Tech and local “tinkerers,” we should be able to grow the startup culture here in Bloomington, Monroe County and the region.

Honestly, we are just getting started in evaluating the needs and coming up with ideas and strategies to launch more small businesses locally.

Perhaps programs such as Lemonade Day and the newly branded Academy for Life Sciences and Entrepreneurship (New Tech High School) are a few small ways to encourage youth to think about their own business as a career choice. Entrepreneurs need to be vocal in letting us know what they think — they are the audience we need to hear from as we roll all this out.

We should be able to shed some light on this issue with some recommendations later this summer, so stay tuned.

Steve Bryant directs the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Ivy Tech graduates understand the importance of education

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Ivy Tech graduates understand the importance of education

Our opinion
May 19, 2013

Friday night, Ivy Tech Community College in Bloomington conferred 824 associate degrees, certificates and technical certificates during commencement exercises. Each individual who graduated could tell a story of what the Ivy Tech experience has meant to them.

They included Jonathon Holland, who was featured in an H-T story earlier this week. The 26-year-old earned an associate degree in general studies with Magna Cum Laude honors, an achievement that must have seemed impossible when he was serving time in jail and recovering from addiction. But he’s remade himself with the help of Ivy Tech, earning the college’s humanitarian award for volunteer work with people recovering from addictions or re-entering society after being incarcerated.

His story illustrates the encouragement Ivy Tech gives its students to become involved in their community.

Others were international students, such as Jenny Abaunza-Jaramillo, 32, who received an associate of applied science in business administration with a Magna Cum Laude designation. She’s an international student from Colombia who wanted to expand her educational experiences in this country after receiving a bachelor’s degree in business from a school in her native country.

Some are military veterans, such as Bobbie Olivo, who received a technical certificate in Computer Information Systems and will receive an associate of applied science computer information systems this summer (Magna Cum Laude).

She joined the U.S. Air Force after high school and served during the first Gulf War. After eight years of distinguished service, she left the Air Force and began working. She then decided she wanted to go to college, and felt Ivy Tech was a good place for her. She enrolled when she was 39, and she, too, has been active in campus and community events.

The stories go on. Ronald E. Neibel Jr., 34, a City of Bloomington firefighter/engineer, is a first-generation college student who received his associate of applied science in public safety; Judith Thompson, 54, lost her job in the midst of the recession in 2009 and returned to school to get an associate of science in accounting; Lisa Calkins, 46, was a stay-at-home mother for 12 years, then re- entered the workforce and eventually began taking classes that led to a technical certificate in accounting and a certificate in payroll.

Congratulations to them all and to the hundreds of others who celebrated completing one leg of their educational journey Friday. They likely understand better than most the importance of learning new skills and gaining new knowledge — and the ongoing nature of education.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Commencement ceremony at Ivy Tech Community College offers many success stories

HeraldTimesOnline.com

Commencement ceremony at Ivy Tech Community College offers many success stories

By Abby Tonsing
331-4245 | atonsing@heraldt.com
May 18, 2013

Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington awarded 824 associate degrees, certificates and technical certificates at commencement Friday evening at the Indiana University Auditorium.

Each graduate had a moment in the spotlight.

Names, degrees and honors were read aloud as the graduates crossed the stage, shook hands and received their degrees.

Tassels were moved from the right side of caps to the left.

Nursing graduates received pins and recited a pledge to all in attendance.

Ivy Tech College President Thomas Snyder charged the graduating class with three additional tasks:

Tell their compelling stories. “You can say, ‘I did this, so can you.’”

Be a coach. “It’s time to pay it forward.”

And wear Ivy Tech. Literally and figuratively.

“Be visible. Be in the community. Tell people what you’ve done. Be Ivy Tech,” Snyder said.

Bobbie Olivo wore her Ivy Tech accomplishments in white lettering atop her black cap — an associate degree, a grade point average of 3.8 and plans to continue her education at Indiana Wesleyan University.

Olivo, who moved to Indiana three years ago, received an associate of applied sciences in computer information systems. She decided to attend Ivy Tech because the college embraced older, nontraditional students, like herself.

Two years ago, she started out as a “scared to death” 39-year-old freshman. Since then, she conquered her fears.

“I’ve successfully completed something I’ve always wanted to do,” Olivo said before the ceremony. She’s also earned magna cum laude honors.

She changed the direction of her life, which commencement speaker Daniel Stec instructed his fellow graduates to do.

“Without direction, an open door is just a hole in the wall,” Stec, who received an associate of science degree in nursing, said to his classmates.

“Go out and proudly tell people you are an alumni, and following the direction of greatness. Stand up. Find your direction. And change the world.”

It is the unique story and circumstance of each Ivy Tech student that makes the college a great institution, he said.

Tiffany Hayes pointed to her two children — 14-year-old Michael and 8-year-old Justin — as her inspirations to attend Ivy Tech, while working there full time. She wanted to better herself and the lives of her children, she said of taking classes and receiving an associate degree in paralegal studies.

By Friday evening, William Fletcher, 29, had received two associate degrees in the past two years. Last year, he did not attend graduation to receive his degree in general studies. But Friday, he donned a cap and gown to receive his degree in computer information technology.

“It’s kind of the light at the end of the tunnel,” he said of graduation evening, adding it was just one of several to-do boxes to check off his list. Next up, attending Indiana Wesleyan University.

Also among those in attendance for Ivy Tech’s graduation were international students from six different countries, military veterans, students graduating with a variety of honors and five of Ivy Tech’s own employees, including Hayes.

Hayes was mentioned by name by Chancellor John Whikehart during the ceremony as he also honored military veterans and first-generation college students, among others.

The ceremony not only marked a special occasion for Ivy Tech graduates, but celebrated the 50th anniversary of the college and 10th anniversary of the school in its current site at the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building.


Award recipients

Each commencement ceremony, Ivy Tech-Bloomington recognizes students for outstanding academic achievements. Academic program chairs in 27 programs of study choose students to receive this award.

Award recipients include: accounting, Judith Thompson; biotechnology, Erin Bond Crain; business administration, Ashley Barker Delp; computer information systems, Sarah Bruce; computer information technology, Greg Platt; criminal justice, Theodore Miles; design technology, Dale Webb; early childhood education, Serenity Guthrie; education, Erin Steury; energy technology, William Harold VanHorn; engineering technology, Tonya DeFord; general studies, Jonathan Holland; health care support, Hollyn Fowler; health information technology, Emily Messmacher; heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology, Timothy Welch; hospitality administration, Laura Crone; industrial technology, Kevin Craig; kinesiology, Vivian Newforth; liberal arts, Emily Musgrave; nursing, Julia DeOliveira and Michelle Usrey; office administration, Jessica Kuehner; paralegal studies, Melanie Griffith; paramedic science, Jason Chinn; practical nursing, Elizabeth Leveque; public safety technology, Ronald Neibel Jr.; radiation therapy, Stacy Hall; and respiratory care, Elizabeth James.

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Sarah Miles waits under a tree outside the IU Aditorium for rain to stop Friday before graduating with an Associate of Science in Nursing from Ivy Tech. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

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Ivy Tech graduate Lauren Ritz, right, hugs Ivy Tech School of Nursing dean Pam Thompson after receiving her nursing pin at commencement ceremonies Friday. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

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Amber Weyrich, who was getting an Associate Degree in Radiation Therapy, shields herself from the rain before entering the IU Auditorium to graduate from Ivy Tech-Bloomington on Friday. Jeremy Hogan | Herald-Times

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Bobbie Olivo

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Tiffany Hayes

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William Fletcher

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013