Susie Graham named Ivy Tech’s Executive Director for Resource Development

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 30, 2013

Susie Graham named Ivy Tech’s Executive Director for Resource Development

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus has named Susie Graham its new Executive Director for Resource Development.  Graham transitioned this past spring to her new role with the Ivy Tech Foundation, from her previous role as Executive Director for the Center for Lifelong Learning.

“Susie was the founding director when we launched the Center for Lifelong Learning, which under her leadership, has grown exponentially to offer classes for everyone in the community – children, adults, and seniors,” Chancellor Whikehart said. “We look forward now to Susie’s leadership in the Foundation office, growing and ensuring an adequate and sustainable resource base for all of our programs.”

Graham says it was an honor to serve as director of Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s lifelong learning programs, and looks forward to expanding upon the college’s community of supporters to benefit students, faculty, and academic programs.

“The Ivy Tech Foundation plays a key role in supporting the college,” Graham said. “The new realities of reduced state funding and diminishing resources for education make our work even more important.”

Graham joined Ivy Tech in 2006 and directed the Center for Lifelong Learning until spring 2013 when she assumed leadership of the Foundation office. Previously, Graham worked as the executive vice president of the Bloomington Board of Realtors and as client relations manager for the Global Business Information Network at the Kelley School of Business. She is immediate past president of the Indiana Council on Continuing Education and immediate past chair for the Bloomington Lifelong Learning Coalition. Graham currently serves on the board for Area 10 Agency on Aging and has previously served the boards of Lotus Education and Arts Foundation, Bloomington POPS, and United Way Vision Council.

Graham is a graduate of Indiana University, holds a certificate in nonprofit management from Duke University, and is a graduate of Leadership Bloomington Monroe-County.

The Ivy Tech Foundation partners with donors to support students, faculty, and academic programs. Through private, charitable gifts and grants, Ivy Tech keeps its commitment to keeping college affordable, advancing academic excellence, and investing in programs through advanced technologies, equipment, and facilities. Together, these efforts combine to change lives and make Indiana great.

For information about how to join Ivy Tech in changing lives, visit www.ivytech.edu/bloomington/foundation.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech’s civic engagement director one of Chamber’s ‘10 under 40’ in Bloomington

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 30, 2013

Ivy Tech’s civic engagement director one of Chamber’s ‘10 under 40’ in Bloomington

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus Executive Director of Civic Engagement, Chelsea Rood-Emmick, MSW, LSW, has been named one of the Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce’s “10 Under 40” young professionals in Bloomington. During an awards ceremony held on Friday, July 25, Rood-Emmick was recognized for her efforts in volunteerism, leadership of service-learning courses, and community engagement through Ivy Tech’s Center for Civic Engagement, which have resulted in a positive economic impact.

In the 2012/2013 academic year (to date), 3,546 students in76 service learning classes contributed nearly 33,000 volunteer hours in Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s service area of Green, Lawrence, Martin, Morgan, Monroe, and Owen counties. In the past year, through volunteerism and service learning combined, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has contributed a total value of *$1,185,995 in its service area. *Figure based on national value of volunteer time from www.IndependentSector.org.

Also, with Rood-Emmick’s leadership of the Center for Civic Engagement, Ivy Tech-Bloomington has been named a member of the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for six consecutive years.

In her role as Executive Director of the Center for Civic Engagement, Rood-Emmick leads students on international service trips through Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Alternative Spring Break (ASB) program each year. She has led students on trips to Calnali, Mexico and currently takes students on trips to Antigua, Guatemala. ASB students help build houses, donate shoes, volunteer in schools, and often become active volunteers in Bloomington when they return to the States.

She also leads Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s annual “O’Bannon Institute Day of Service,” which brings together students, faculty, and staff for a day of volunteerism in our communities. As part of the 2013 Day of Service, she coordinated the “Little Free Libraries” project. Ivy Tech facilities staff built three weatherproof boxes, which were placed at Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard, Community Kitchen-Crestmont, and Middle Way House, for people to borrow or donate books. The libraries were made of scrap materials and cost nothing except for some paint to decorate them.

In addition to her service work at Ivy Tech, Rood-Emmick fosters shelter animals for the Bloomington Animal Shelter and is a social work field supervisor for the GLBT Student Support Services office at IU. She also teaches intro to sociology and intro to human services at Ivy Tech and intro to social work at Indiana University Bloomington. In fall 2013, she will begin coursework in Indiana State University’s Ph.D. program in Higher Education Leadership.

For more information about Ivy Tech’s Center for Civic Engagement, log on www.ivytech.edu/civicengagement.

About The Center for Civic Engagement

Established in 2004, the Center for Civic Engagement allows Ivy Tech-Bloomington to model a service-oriented learning environment that promotes service learning, volunteerism and community involvement for our students, faculty and staff. This model benefits the South Central Indiana community, in which more than 90 percent of our graduates choose to live, work and raise families.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech’s Cook Center for Entrepreneurship receives Duke Energy grant

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 25, 2013

Ivy Tech’s Cook Center for Entrepreneurship receives Duke Energy grant

The Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington’s campus received a $5,000 grant from Duke Energy that will be used to assist the college in bringing together regional leaders to build a roadmap and action plan for innovation, entrepreneurship, and small business formation.

“The Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship is pleased to have the support of Duke Energy and the Duke Energy Foundation in supporting our Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Road Mapping project,” said Steve Bryant, executive director, Cook Center at Ivy Tech-Bloomington. “This grant provides more resources for our strategic planning efforts to develop recommendations for how to grow entrepreneurship in our region.”

Currently, the region has a wealth of support resources for entrepreneurs such as Small Business Development Centers, SCORE, public libraries, economic development groups, university resources, and government resources, but each of these organizations operates independently and not as a network of support for entrepreneurs.

The Cook Center plans to use the Duke Energy grant to assist with funding this entrepreneurial ecosystem project, a project that that would bring support groups together to create a roadmap of services and resources in the region. Also, this would create ease of navigating between support organizations for entrepreneurs, and facilitate communication between organizations to help each of them better tailor services to the needs of local entrepreneurs.

“Duke Energy is proud to support this important project to foster entrepreneurship in Bloomington, Monroe County and beyond,” said Bruce Calloway, district manager, Duke Energy. “This partnership of many organizations is exactly the kind of collaborative spirit that makes a difference in growing an economy.”

To begin the project, the Cook Center plans to convene with support organizations and entrepreneurs in within the region to gain feedback on the project. The Center will also research other communities and regions that have done similar projects to determine best practices, and finally the Center will present a report with an action plan to develop and distribute the roadmap. The roadmap will be a living document which is publicly available to the entrepreneurial community.

Community partners of the project include the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County (provided initial grant of $35,000), Ivy Tech Community College and Ivy Tech Foundation, Bloomington Economic Development Corporation, the City of Bloomington Department of Economic and Sustainable Development, and Duke Energy.

For more information about Ivy Tech’s Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship log on www.ivytech.edu/entrepreneurship or call 812-330-6261.

About Duke Energy

Duke Energy (www.duke-energy.com) Indiana’s operations provide approximately 6,900 megawatts of owned electric capacity to approximately 790,000 customers, making it the state’s largest electric supplier. Duke Energy is the largest electric power holding company in the United States with more than $110 billion in total assets. Its regulated utility operations serve approximately 7.2 million electric customers located in six states in the Southeast and Midwest. Its commercial power and international business segments own and operate diverse power generation assets in North America and Latin America, including a growing portfolio of renewable energy assets in the United States. Headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., Duke Energy is a Fortune 250 company traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol DUK.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech seeks TIF money for additional building

Ivy Tech seeks TIF money for additional building

By Rachel Bunn
331-4357 | rbunn@heraldt.com

Hours after receiving word that a $24 million expansion was approved by the Indiana Legislature, Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington chancellor was already looking ahead for more expansion opportunities.

Chancellor John Whikehart presented a request to the Monroe County Redevelopment Commission Wednesday evening for $1.6 million to help finance the purchase and renovation of the Pain Real Estate building at the intersection of Daniel’s Way and Ind. 48, just west of Ivy Tech’s main academic building. The total amount needed for the project would be about $3.6 million, Whikehart said.

Ivy Tech’s growth has outpaced its population projections, which called for the Bloomington campus to have about 5,000 students this year. The 2013 population is about 6,800, Whikehart said. To help accommodate that growth, the college is leasing additional buildings for about $500,000 per year.

“I need to try to get out of leased space, if I can,” Whikehart said.

Members of the redevelopment commission did not vote on the item, but requested more information about the project and what the commission’s role would be.

Commission member Don Moore asked Whikehart if there is support for the project from other businesses in the Westside Tax Increment Financing District, where Ivy Tech is located. Since Ivy Tech does not pay property taxes, the money would be coming out of their pockets.

“I’d like to be sure that the tax contributors into this, that you have their support,” Moore said.

Don Duncan, another member of the commission, asked for a list of potential projects slated for the Westside TIF  to determine if there is enough money in the district to support the Ivy Tech proposal. Duncan said he isn’t necessarily for or against the project, but would like more information.

“I do think it’s an opportunity, and sometimes we have to be flexible to meet the opportunity,” he said. “I think we have to do our due diligence.”

This is not the first time Ivy Tech has asked for help from the redevelopment commission.

In 2006, the redevelopment commission issued a $5 million bond from the Westside TIF to help build the Indiana Center for Life Sciences.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

$24M expansion OK’d for Ivy Tech’s main Bloomington building

$24M expansion OK’d for Ivy Tech’s main Bloomington building

85,000 square feet to be added to Ferguson Academic Building

By Mike Leonard
331-4368 | mleonard@heraldt.com

Whikehart_1

Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart greets Ivy Tech Community College students on the first day of classes in 2011. A $24 million expansion of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building has finally won state approval. Monty Howell | Herald-Times

The Indiana Legislature’s State Budget Committee approved a $24 million project to expand Ivy Tech Community College’s primary Bloomington building at the committee’s meeting Wednesday in Indianapolis.

The approval is the final step in a six-year effort to increase the size of the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, which opened in 2002.

“It seems like this project has been delayed for so long, it’s a bit surreal that it’s finally been approved to move forward,” Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart said late Wednesday afternoon. “There’s a lot of excitement here today.”

Ivy Tech moved into its current location on Daniel’s Way on Bloomington’s west side in 2002 and served a student enrollment of 2,600. In the following decade, it became one of the fastest-growing community colleges in the country, increasing in enrollment to 6,800 in the 2012-13 school year. The rapid growth has forced the college to spend $460,000 annually on leased space for classrooms and college programs.

The Phase 2 expansion will add 85,000 gross square feet to the existing 148,000-square-foot building. Additional classrooms, science labs, faculty offices, computer labs, an auditorium and student wellness center will all be added with the expansion.

Some remodeling of the existing building will take place as well, with the bookstore, library, student commons and tutoring center moving into the Phase 2 space.

The addition will not erase all of Ivy Tech’s need for leased facilities, however, because the college’s culinary program is located near the campus in well-equipped kitchen space in the former home of an MCL cafeteria. Still, Whikehart said the expansion should enable the campus to cut its leasing costs in half.

Although Ivy Tech worked with architects and construction engineers to draw up expansion plans in 2007, portions of the plans need revision, Whikehart said. After the Indiana Higher Education Commission approved the general expansion plan last month, Ivy Tech officials have been meeting with architects weekly in anticipation of the possible final approval of bonding authority construction this week.

“If we can keep to our current schedule and everything goes perfect, we could be in the new area in the fall of 2015,” Whikehart said. “Few things in life go perfectly, however, so under less-than-perfect conditions, we still think we can occupy the new space in the spring of 2016.”

State Budget Committee Chairman Luke Kenley, a Republican state senator from Noblesville, said the Bloomington project seemed “worthwhile” and said, “I know they’ve been waiting a while. We’re glad to be able to move this forward.”

Fellow committee member and state Rep. Tim Brown, R-Crawfordsville, said he was impressed that the Bloomington campus serves students from 71 Indiana counties and noted, “We felt confident that they will be able to sustain the enrollment this investment requires.”

The budget committee approved bonding authority for $20 million. “The state has the expectation that 20 percent of the construction costs should be raised privately, so the remaining $4 million is up to us,” Whikehart said. “We got a nice jump on that with a $1 million donation from Connie and Steve Ferguson, and we have been building in some funds through reserves — money we’ve squirreled away here and there. But we will have some money we have to raise.”

State Rep. Matt Pierce, D-Bloomington, commended the State Budget Committee in a statement late Wednesday afternoon but criticized state officials for delaying the project.

“The original funding was approved during the 2009 special session. However, the funding was held by the Daniels administration, which meant the state has been wasting tax money for years on rent for buildings scattered throughout Bloomington,” Pierce said in a prepared statement. “Fortunately, Ivy Tech will now pay less for the bond to construct the new addition than it has been spending on rental costs. I appreciate the new administration and the State Budget Committee for ending the penny-wise, pound-foolish policy of the previous administration by finally getting the project underway before construction costs rise any higher.”

Pierce was especially critical of the decision to delay the project when construction costs dropped by 20-25 percent during the recession.

IU & other approval

Indiana University also won approval for a major project it has been seeking at its Northwest campus in Gary. The budget committee approved a $45 million joint project with Ivy Tech Community College Northwest to replace Tamarack Hall with a new facility. The previous building was severely damaged in a 2008 flood.

The committee also approved a Department of Natural Resources $292,000 project to replace a 40-slip floating dock at Paynetown Marina at Lake Monroe.

Copyright: HeraldTimesOnline.com 2013

Geoff Grodner and Lorelei Meeker establish endowed culinary arts scholarship at Ivy Tech

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 1, 2013

Geoff Grodner and Lorelei Meeker establish endowed culinary arts scholarship at Ivy Tech

The Ivy Tech Foundation announced today the establishment of the Geoff Grodner and Lorelei Meeker Endowed Culinary Scholarship at the Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington campus. The scholarship is intended to encourage students of promise and need who desire to pursue careers in the culinary arts field.

“Lorelei and I hope to enable students who share our passion of cooking and great food to continue their studies and pursuit of a degree in culinary arts,” Grodner said.

The scholarship will be awarded to second-year Culinary Arts students in the Associate of Applied Science in Hospitality Administration degree program. Scholarships will be awarded based on financial need, academic merit, and demonstrated culinary skill and aptitude.

“Geoff and Lorelei’s gift is an important addition to our growing body of scholarships,” Ivy Tech-Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart said. “As an endowed fund, their generosity will enable us to assist culinary students both immediately and permanently.”

More than 160 degree-seeking students are enrolled in the culinary arts program at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus. Accredited by the American Culinary Federation, the program is chaired locally by Chef Jeffrey Taber.

Grodner, managing partner of Bloomington law firm Mallor Grodner, was appointed to Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Regional Board of Trustees in December 2012. Meeker retired from Indiana University as associate vice president for procurement services.

For information about Ivy Tech’s hospitality administration degree program, log on to www.ivytech.edu/academics.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.