YMCA to hold job fair at Ivy Tech, looking to fill part-time positions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 20, 2013

YMCA to hold job fair at Ivy Tech, looking to fill part-time positions

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus is hosting a job fair for the Monroe County YMCA next week. The job fair will be held on Tuesday, September 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Hoosier Times Student Commons, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building on the college’s main campus.

The YMCA is seeking part-time staff for both the new northwest YMCA location, and the southeast YMCA location. The northwest location is expected to open in November. Positions to be filled include: life guards, swimming instructors, member services staff, personal trainers, wellness coach supervisors, administrative assistant, drop off child care staff, land and aquatic fitness instructors, gymnastics instructors, nutritionist, and accounting assistant.

Those interested in working at the YMCA are encouraged to bring a completed job application and resume to the job fair on Tuesday. Applications are online at www.monroecountyymca.org.

Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus is located on the west side at 200 Daniels Way.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities.  In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

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Founder of Emmis Communications, Jeffrey Smulyan, to speak at annual Cook Institute in October

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 16, 2013

Founder of Emmis Communications, Jeffrey Smulyan, to speak at annual Cook Institute in October

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship is hosting its fourth annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus on Tuesday, October 22 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jeffrey Smulyan, Founder of Emmis Communications Corporation, is the keynote speaker. The Cook Institute luncheon will be held in the Hoosier-Times Student Commons, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic Building, on the college’s main campus.

“It is the mission of the Cook Center to engage the community and foster entrepreneurship in the region, and the Cook Institute is an example of how the Center connects the community through its programs,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “The Cook Center looks forward to hosting keynote speaker, and visionary leader of the radio industry, Jeffrey Smulyan.”

Smulyan, the luncheon’s keynote speaker, is Founder and Chairman of the Board of Emmis Communications Corporation, an Indianapolis-based radio and magazine publishing company with operations in eight U.S. markets. Smulyan has been inducted into the Broadcasting & Cable Hall of Fame and Indiana Business Hall of Fame. Emmis was named one of FORTUNE magazine’s “100 Best Companies to Work for.”

Individual tickets for Ivy Tech’s fourth annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship luncheon are $75, a table of eight can be purchased for $600, and full event sponsorships for $1,500.

Proceeds go to support scholarships for Ivy Tech-Bloomington entrepreneurship students and Cook Center programs. A portion of ticket purchases are tax deductible.

To purchase tickets, log on www.ivytech.edu/entrepreneurship or call (812) 330-6261.

About the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship (www.ivytech.edu/entrepreneurship) at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was established in 2010 to develop and implement practical tools and resources for students, individuals, and the community to foster entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington and in the broader economic development region it serves.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities.  In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

Ivy Tech registration now open for non-credit classes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 10, 2013

Ivy Tech registration now open for non-credit classes

Ivy Tech registration is open for non-credit, personal enrichment and workforce training classes at the Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley.

“Aging and Skin Cancer” is a new class offered this year, instructed by Dr. William Weber, board certified in Plastic Surgery and Otolaryngology and a Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery at IU Medical School for over 30 years. Dr. Weber will address changes that occur in the skin with aging, as well as provide information for identifying and preventing skin cancer. Bring a friend and gain information and insights for your own good health and wellbeing. “Aging and Skin Cancer” will be held on Thursday, September 19, from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost is $49.

One-day “ArtReach” workshops, “Needle Felt Pendant Jewelry,” “Hinshaw’s Rock’n Gems Lapidary,” and “Wire Tapped and Hand-Forged Jewelry” will also be offered. The workshops are led by three artist-members of French Lick Artisan, Inc.

Cooking and wellness classes are also offered at Burton-Kimble Farms, Rosie Kimble’s homestead: a gathering place for enrichment, relaxation, learning and fun, located just 2 miles east of downtown Orleans in Orange County.

Workforce training courses offered by Ivy Tech include computers, Microsoft Office programs, ServSafe certification, and professional courses for educators.

A full list of Ivy Tech classes offered in Orange County can be found at www.ivytech.edu/orangecounty.

The Orange County Learning Center at Springs Valley is located at 479 S. Larry Bird Blvd. French Lick, IN.

About Ivy Tech Orange County Learning Center

Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington opened the Orange County Learning Center to provide easy access to higher education and workforce training in Orange County. The center allows students to earn credits toward an Ivy Tech Associate degree by taking classes close to home. Since opening, the learning center has expanded offerings in for-credit academic courses, and non-credit workforce training and personal-enrichment courses.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities.  In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

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Our Opinion: Yes to county’s property buy

The Herald-Times

Our Opinion: Yes to county’s property buy

Posted: Saturday, September 7, 2013 12:00 am

Ivy Tech Community College is a state institution, right? Right.

Ivy Tech doesn’t pay property taxes, correct? Yes, that’s correct.

Then why is Monroe County about to buy a building currently on the tax rolls and essentially give it to Ivy Tech, which as a public entity doesn’t pay property taxes?

And why should the county subsidize the state, anyway? It’s a state college, right?

Those questions are legitimate, but still, the county’s purchase of the now vacant Pain Real Estate building just opposite the Ivy Tech campus, with plans to turn it over to Ivy Tech, is a good idea and good policy.

The money to pay off the $2 million bond to be used in the purchase will come from the county’s westside Tax Increment Finance (TIF) district. The district captures property taxes levied on new development within its bounds since 1994, the year the tax was first collected. That money then must be used for redevelopment and infrastructure improvements within the TIF.

The district includes much of the industrial/commercial development just west of Bloomington and includes the Cook world headquarters building, finished in 2002.

Back to the questions. First, while it is a bit incongruous that local government should be buying buildings for the state, the reality is that there’s no telling when or if that entity might actually cough up the money needed for the purchase.

It was tough enough to wring $24 million out of Indiana to pay for Ivy Tech’s much needed expansion of its main campus building. That was only approved this year after several years of lobbying by campus and college officials. This is certainly less money, but it can’t wait forever. Another buyer might come along any day, foreclosing the possibility of creating still urgently needed new classrooms even with the current expansion plan. And this building is just across the street from Ivy Tech’s main building.

But what about the fact that the purchase will permanently remove the building from the property tax rolls? That’s absolutely true. But from this vantage point, the trade-off is worth it.

There is nothing more important for this region and for the state than a system that supports our graduating high school seniors (and older students) in pursuit of post-high school training.

Yes, we have an excellent major national university just down the road with Indiana University. But that isn’t for everyone. Even though a state university, it’s quite expensive, in fact, and that alone makes it inaccessible for many prospective students.

And not everyone, as we know, is ready for the transition to a giant, teeming and intimidating campus at age 18. For many, then, Ivy Tech is a bridge to help them across.

TIF money is supposed to be used for improvements that encourage employment growth and development.

Redevelopment commissioner Don Moore argues that the purchase and future use of the building would provide one of the “biggest bangs for the buck” the county could find. We agree.

Bond for Ivy Tech building clears first hurdle

The Herald Times

Bond for Ivy Tech building clears first hurdle

Redevelopment commission in favor of issuing $2M bond tied to TIF district funding

Posted: Thursday, September 5, 2013 12:10 am | Updated: 1:52 am, Thu Sep 5, 2013.

By Rachel Bunn
331-4357 | rbunn@heraldt.com

Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington is one step closer to getting more space.

The Monroe County Redevelopment Commission voted in favor Wednesday of issuing a $2 million bond and entering a contract for the purchase of the Pain Real Estate building at the intersection of Daniels Way and Ind. 48, just west of Ivy Tech’s main academic building.

The planned bond still needs to be approved by the Monroe County Council and the Monroe County Board of Commissioners, and the proposal will return to the redevelopment commission for a public hearing.

The bond will cover the Westside TIF District fund’s share of the $1,625,000 purchase price — Ivy Tech provided $25,000 toward the purchase — as well as bond counsel fees and provide a cushion for the redevelopment commission, should it be necessary, said Jeff Cockerill, county attorney.

The interest rate for the bond is expected to be about 2.75 to 3 percent, and will last for the life of the Westside Tax Increment Financing District, which is set to expire in 2024.

Redevelopment commissioner Doug Duncan said he would like to see a lease between the commission and Ivy Tech be in place by the commission’s October meeting.

“This is a wonderful thing for the community,” Duncan said of the project. “But I don’t want to depend on just good intentions.”

TIF districts use property taxes generated by new construction in their areas to pay for infrastructure or debts incurred by infrastructure improvements. The idea is the districts use public funding to subsidize redevelopment and improvements that will serve a particular area.

There are three TIF districts in Monroe County: the Westside TIF, the State Road 46 TIF and the Fullerton Pike TIF.

In total, $14.6 million in projects have been completed in the Westside TIF, and another $9.5 million are planned, not including the Pain Building purchase. Most of these projects include road, bridge and other infrastructure projects, though TIF dollars have provided things such as training for local businesses and a fire truck for the Ellettsville Fire Department.

“At this point, we’re looking at 10 years on the horizon,” commission president Barry Lessow said. “These things are all pieces.”

The Westside TIF is estimated to raise $28 million by 2024. The Westside TIF district raised about $1.1 million in revenues in 2012, according to its final report for the year.

Ivy Tech Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart provided the redevelopment commission with testimony from businesses in the area, which were unanimously in favor of the project, redevelopment commissioner Don Moore said.

Though as a state college Ivy Tech does not pay property taxes, redevelopment commissioners say investing in Ivy Tech is an investment in the community.

Moore said he considered the project one of the biggest “bangs for the buck” that the county could invest in.

“This is the poster child project,” Duncan said, adding that some communities have mishandled TIF projects. “This is a great example of how TIFs work.”

In June, Whikehart asked for $1.6 million for purchase of the Pain Building. The total project will cost $3.6 million. Ivy Tech will pay for the renovation.

Ivy Tech’s growth has outpaced its enrollment projections by about 1,800 students, and the Pain Building will be used to house health sciences classes.

This is not the first time the redevelopment commission approved money for Ivy Tech. A $5 million bond was approved in 2007 to help build the Ivy Tech’s Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, a building that serves as a training facility for local students and local life-sciences employees.

In the case of the Center for Life Sciences, Ivy Tech owns the land the building sits on, and rents it to the redevelopment commission. The redevelopment commission then rents both the land and the building, which it owns, to the college for $1 a year.