Bloomington City Council Approves New Ivy Tech Building

Indiana Public Media

Bloomington City Council Approves New Ivy Tech Building

By Lacy Nowling
Posted October 31, 2013

The Bloomington City Council approved a $2 million bond for Ivy Tech Community College to acquire a new building.

Bloomington City Council members unanimously voted Wednesday to issue a $2 million bond that will allow Ivy Tech Community College to add another building of classrooms to its campus.

Issuance of the bond, which is through the county’s Westside Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District, will allow Ivy Tech to lease the building in Bloomington from the city for 1 dollar a year for ten years.

Ivy Tech will make any needed improvements or updates to the building before it opens its doors in the fall of 2014. The college plans to use the building for health care classes.

State law gives the City Council a vote in this particular matter because it annexed three parcels within the Westside TIF District in the 1990s. The Council’s approval ensures that the city’s interest in the tax revenue from the areas of land is protected.

Monroe County attorney Jeff Cockerill assured the Council that the bond “will not impact the parcels or change the TIF revenue received by the city of Bloomington.”

The bond issuance also required the approval of the Monroe County Redevelopment Commission, which passed the bond in September.

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Ivy Tech seeking guidance on calculating lecturers’ hours under Affordable Care Act

Heraldtimesonline.com

Ivy Tech seeking guidance on calculating lecturers’ hours under Affordable Care Act

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

By Jon Blau
331-4266 | jblau@heraldt.com

Ivy Tech Community College is still waiting for federal government guidance on how preparation time will be calculated for adjunct lecturers’ hours and what effects that could have on the college’s responsibilities to provide health insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

In the meantime, demand for economics and psychology classes has forced Ivy Tech Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart to seek exemptions for some adjuncts from system-wide rules mandating they teach no more than three classes, or nine credit hours, because prep time could have those teachers averaging 30 or more hours per week.

In the case of economics this fall, there are 22 sections, 17 of which are taught by adjuncts, with two adjuncts handling four sections each. Psychology is even more popular, requiring 48 sections and 37 adjuncts to teach them, four of those adjuncts maintaining four classes apiece.

Both psychology and economics are popular general education credits, both for students working toward associate’s degrees at the college and for transfer-bound students looking to get into Indiana University. The college’s unique relationship with IU is something that often drives class sizes; in calculus, for example, Ivy Tech sections often fill up with students from IU who take the class because its class sizes are smaller, while the coursework itself mirrors what the university offers.

Nonetheless, part-time faculty pick up a large percentage of the class load for Ivy Tech, which puts the institution in a challenging position when it comes to finding lecturers to put at the head of classrooms without a potential expansion of its health care budget.

“We still don’t know what it’s going to mean for us,” Whikehart said of the health care law.

The community college has worked around a potential mandate to cover adjunct lecturers’ health insurance, for the most part, by hiring more of them. Ivy Tech does require adjuncts to have a master’s degree, a qualification that’s easier to find in Bloomington than in Kokomo, Whikehart said, but it is hard enough to find that a few adjuncts have had to teach more than three courses.

Before the Affordable Care Act imposed a 30-hour threshold for requiring employers to provide health insurance to an employee, adjuncts were able to teach as many as six classes, Whikehart said.

He called the three-class limit a “conservative” approach, so that even if the government awards an adjunct two hours of prep time per credit hour — nine hours for class time and 18 hours for prep — that adjunct will remain at 27 hours per week.

THEATER REVIEW: ‘NO EXIT’ Damnation may be just being with others

The Herald Times

THEATER REVIEW: ‘NO EXIT’ Damnation may be just being with others

Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 12:00 am | Updated: 12:06 am, Mon Oct 28, 2013.

By Doris Lynch
H-T Reviewer

You know your place of lodging skirts the usual when a valet (Leonardo Diaz) informs you that no toothbrush is necessary, or even a bed.

That’s the eerie situation Garcin (convincingly played by Thomas Reed) found himself in on Friday night at the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center in a production of “No Exit” directed by Paul Daily.

The week before All Souls Day and Halloween seems the perfect time for an existentialist journey into hell because that’s where Garcin, a pacifist has landed after being sprayed by 12 bullets for refusing to fight.

Soon Diaz, who presents a stern, no-nonsense valet, returns with Guest No. 2.

Rhianna C. Jones portrays Inez as a woman who adamantly scoffs at congress with men. Jones imparts her character with steely-eyed glares, a mocking tone, quick wit and no interest in “being polite” or ordinary. Jones makes this rather cruel character at times appealing but always interesting.

And what’s a party without at least one awkward threesome?

Soon Estelle arrives, desperate for a looking glass but alas both the room and the ladies’ purses have been stripped of such luxuries. In a world where your eyelids no longer blink four thousand times an hour, a little freshening up might come in handy.

Marissa Whitmer’s high society Parisian Estelle is needy and anxious. At first she allows Inez to be her mirror — a bizarre scene — but before long rebuffs her after Inez keeps urging her to move closer. Although Estelle decides they should make hell a nonspeaking zone, she is the first to break the silence. Although some of her lines imply that she dislikes Inez for her class — Inez is a poor postal clerk — rather than her personality, Whitmer’s acting does not show this.

Sexual tension is an important element in the play. Inez’s many anti-men comments and her overly fawning gazes at Estelle up the ante in this small space. Similarly, Estelle makes some advances toward Garcin, demanding that he kiss and hold her. Both he and Estelle delight in the fact that they will force the domineering and clever Inez to watch their lovemaking.

In fact, one of the joys of this play is the constantly shifting alliances between the three characters. Daily’s blocking and placement of characters creates interesting visual vignettes throughout. Daily has a fine eye for detail. The physical altercations that inevitably develop from being caged with hostile strangers are depicted in a believable manner.

The play included some interesting photographs under Elijah Willis’s direction that were projected onto a screen as each unwilling roommate spoke of his or her past lives. However, this technique was not really effective because no close-ups were involved — perhaps a deliberate choice to suggest the characters’ ethereal states — but one that involved the audience less. Plus, the projected words at the end disappeared before everyone could read them.

Lily Walls did a good job with costumes with 1940s-style dresses, a clutch purse and stockings with seams.

At one point, Garcin hammers repeatedly at the door, screaming for the valet to open it.

After a couple of minutes, the door swings wide but no valet appears behind it. Was this a false hope of freedom or the real shebang? Is hell really that easy to exit? Or does it resemble Garcin’s famous quote from the play: “There’s no need for red hot pokers. Hell is other people.”

In either case, this thought-provoking play provides an evening of stimulating entertainment that is worth a visit to the Rose Firebay.

If you go

WHO: Ivy Tech Student Productions.

WHAT: “No Exit,” by Jean-Paul Sartre, adapted from the French by Paul Bowles.

WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

WHERE: Rose Firebay, Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center.

TICKETS: $15 adults/$5 students and seniors, at the BCT Box Office at 114 E. Kirkwood Ave., the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center before each performance, or call 323-3020. To purchase tickets online, visit www.bctboxoffice.com.

Early retirement possible for 28 at Ivy Tech

The Herald-Times

Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2013 12:00 pm | Updated: 11:27 pm, Tue Nov 26, 2013.
By Jon Blau 331-4266 | jblau@heraldt.com

As Ivy Tech looks to shed costs, about 10 percent of full-time staff at the Bloomington campus received email notices late last week telling them they are eligible for an early retirement program being considered by the state’s community college system.

The system  said it has notified about 700 employees statewide that their age plus their service time would make them eligible for a buyout plan — the sum of the two numbers being between 70 to 75 years. According to Ivy Tech spokesman Jeff Fanter, 28 employees on the Bloomington campus, out of about 200 total, received the email. The notice was sent out only to gauge interest in early retirement options and does not mean the employee will have to make a binding commitment to early retirement or that the college is officially offering those plans.

For some time, the community college has been arguing it needs more state funding to accommodate its workload — part of which is remediation for people coming from places in Indiana where college attainment levels are some of the lowest in the nation  — but funding has “lagged” behind, Bloomington Chancellor John Whikehart said. Because of a lack of state funding, Ivy Tech said in its early retirement email that it will be forced to defer nearly $80 million in spending and not hire additional full-time faculty and academic advisers.

Whikehart, who himself is retiring from Ivy Tech Jan. 15, said he notified Ivy Tech President Tom Snyder of his decision to retire before the email notices went out to employees last week.

“There’s an irony. We are expected to grow, we are asked to offer more educational opportunities, but we are looking at cutting the people who facilitate that learning,” Whikehart said. “It’s a paradox.”

Of the 28 employees who received a notification, 17 are faculty and 10 are administration personnel, Fanter said. One hourly employee received the email. If implemented, retirements would take effect at the end of February for staff and administration and at the end of the spring 2014 term for faculty, according to the notice sent out by Ivy Tech.

The email said participation in an early retirement plan would be “completely voluntary,” with the goal of meeting “cost savings objectives” and to avoid “involuntary reductions in force.” Moreover, the college will be unable to expand programs because of equipment shortages, the email said, specifically pointing to nursing as a program that might have to be downsized statewide.

On the other hand, the Bloomington campus is planning to use the newly acquired Pain Real Estate building to house its nursing program, a plan Whikehart said should be unaffected by statewide funding issues.

Emmis CEO: To really succeed, entrepreneur must love to learn

The Herald Times

Emmis CEO: To really succeed, entrepreneur must love to learn

4th annual Cook Institute luncheon speaker talks about need for passion

Posted: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 12:00 am

By Bob Zaltsberg
331-4364  |  rzaltsberg@heraldt.com

Many traits drive successful entrepreneurs, but none more powerfully than the desire to keep learning, Jeff Smulyan, founder and CEO of Indianapolis-based Emmis Communications Corp., said Tuesday.

“The key to your success will be your love of learning,” Smulyan said during his keynote speech at the 4th Annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship luncheon. “You have to be dedicated about learning (about making your business successful) every day.”

Smulyan said it takes a special commitment to launch an enterprise and encouraged potential entrepreneurs to start with one question:

“Is this what I really want to do?”

“Usually the entrepreneur is the person rolling up his sleeves late at night, the one thinking while on vacation — if you take vacations — about how to fix something at work,” he said. The entrepreneur has “a tremendous passion for something” and can’t imagine working for someone else to fulfill that passion, he said.

He said successful entrepreneurs surround themselves with good people and aren’t afraid of failure. He praised Cook Group founders Gayle and Bill Cook, for whom the Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Community College is named, for seeing opportunities others overlooked.

“Conventional wisdom is conventional wisdom. You win with dreamers,” he said. “Nobody could say when they (the Cooks) were starting their company, ‘This is going to be a home run.’”

He told the audience, which included high school students from the Academy for Science and Entrepreneurship, that success includes fighting through hard times.

“Adversity is the greatest teacher in the world,” he said. “You’re going to have adversity, and if you can deal with adversity … that will be the measure of your success.”

He noted Emmis, which owns and operates 18 FM and three AM mostly large-market stations, and magazines such as Texas Monthly and Los Angeles, was challenged severely during the recession. The downturn in the U.S. economy hurt, but so did having a station the company owned in Hungary, Slager, taken by the government and given to a political party (a year later, a court in Hungary reversed the government’s action). He said Emmis lost 65 percent of its cash flow and had to make a lot of changes to how it did business, including reducing its workforce.

“We made it through and the key was persistence,” he said. “The key was never quitting. We called ourselves the cockroaches of global media because we refused to die.”

Smulyan said Emmis is developing technology he hopes will revolutionize radio as a medium. It involves a partnership with Sprint, activation of an FM tuner already in smart phones, and making radio interactive.

“If we’re right, we can change the radio business,” he said, adding: “In an entrepreneurial culture, you have to be willing to take risks.”

Darby McCarty honored

Darby McCarty, CEO of the communications company Smithville, has been awarded the second annual Excellence in Entrepreneurship award. The award was presented Monday by Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship as kickoff to its 4th Annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship.

“The Cook Center established the ‘Excellence in Entrepreneurship’ award to recognize individuals in the community who become leaders, job creators and entrepreneurs in their field and their community,” Ivy Tech Chancellor John Whikehart said in a news release. “When Darby assumed leadership of Smithville 10 years ago, she began directing the company into a new era of technology and change.”

Smithville was established in 1922. In the past decade, the company has converted all residential and business customers to a full fiber optic network and now offers products and services in cellular, Internet, television, voice and security markets.

No MLB for Indianapolis

Jeff Smulyan has looked hard at whether Indianapolis could support a Major League Baseball team and concluded it can not.

The CEO of Indianapolis-based Emmis Communications led a group that owned the Seattle Mariners from 1989 to 1992. He said he was proud of the progress the Mariners made while he was involved but the economics did not work and ownership lost money.

He said the same thing would happen to anyone who tried to put a team in Indianapolis, which is surrounded by Reds, Cubs, White Sox and Cardinals territories. He said even if a longtime block by the Cincinnati Reds to a Major League team in Indy could be overcome — he said he thought it could — there isn’t enough disposable income and not enough television households or major companies to support necessary suite sales at a ballpark to promise any chance of success.

“You’d be in a business that would be sure to fail,” he said. “My goal is keeping the Pacers and Colts there.”

Darby McCarty earns Ivy Tech’s second annual excellence in entrepreneurship award

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 21, 2013

Darby McCarty earns Ivy Tech’s second annual excellence in entrepreneurship award

Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus awarded Darby McCarty, Smithville CEO, with the second annual Excellence in Entrepreneurship award for her legacy of entrepreneurship on Monday evening, October 21. The award was presented by Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s Gayle and Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship as kickoff to its 4th Annual Cook Institute for Entrepreneurship luncheon.

“The Cook Center established the ‘Excellence in Entrepreneurship’ award to recognize individuals in the community who become leaders, job creators, and entrepreneurs in their field and their community,” said Chancellor John Whikehart. “When Darby assumed leadership of Smithville ten years ago, she began directing the company into a new era of technology and change. Additionally, Ivy Tech is recognizing Darby for her entrepreneurial spirit that has been passed through generations, and for embracing change and focusing on the development potential of both Smithville and the community.”

Indiana’s largest independent telecom company, Smithville, was established in 1922 to connect major Monroe County Stone quarries at Clear Creek, Smithville, and Ellettsville. Over the years, the family company has gone from an all manual operation to providing digital services in 18 counties.

McCarty took the reins of leadership of Smithville in 2003. Since then, the company has invested millions to convert all residential and business customers to a full fiber optic network and now offers Internet, television, voice, security, and cellular services, and products.

Under McCarty’s leadership, Smithville has received national “Top 100 Broadband” recognition for three consecutive years, alongside other national companies like Google, Verizon, and AT&T.

She is active on many boards and committees in the community, including Indiana State Chapter of Commerce, IU Health Bloomington Hospital Foundation, Indiana University Varsity Club, Indiana Telecommunications Council, and U.S. Telecommunications Council.

For more information about the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech-Bloomington, contact (812) 330- 6261 or www.ivytech.edu/entrepreneurship.

About the Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship

The Gayle & Bill Cook Center for Entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus was established in 2010 to develop and implement practical tools and resources for students, individuals, and the community to foster entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Bloomington and in the broader economic development region it serves.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities.  In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

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Ivy Tech to host depression screening services

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 7, 2013

Ivy Tech to host depression screening services

In an effort to raise awareness of the mental health services that are available to students, Ivy Tech Community College’s Bloomington campus will participate in a Depression Screening Day on Monday, October 14.  Depression screening will take place on the main campus, in the Connie and Steve Ferguson Academic building, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the first floor rotunda.

Therapists, faculty, and student volunteers will hand out information related to depression, and offer a brief screening for students to determine if they are experiencing any form of depression. Referrals for students to help combat depression will be available.

“This is Ivy Tech-Bloomington’s third year conducting Depression Screening Day, and each year we serve more students than the year before,” said Kenin Krieger, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Psychology and Human Services. “Last year alone, we completed more than 100 screens as well as provided a wealth of information about depression to over 700 people throughout the day.”

Ivy Tech Bloomington’s Office of Student Support and Development has partnered with IUs Center for Human Growth to offer free counseling services to students through the Counseling and Outreach program. The program provides service to Ivy Tech students in the form of individual counseling and personal growth groups to help with a variety of problems including depression, stress management, and relationship troubles. All counseling is confidential.

Ivy Tech students can make appointments with the counseling and outreach center at (812) 330-6287 or email counseling-r14@lists.ivytech.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College
Ivy Tech Community College (www.ivytech.edu) is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system serving nearly 200,000 students annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its communities.  In addition, its courses and programs transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana. It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association.

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